News

May 15, 2020

On May 5, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Alleghany County. The history of the bear cub is limited, though the bear did spend some time with humans prior to his arrival at the Center. 

Dr. Karra examined the cub when he arrived, and found that he was bright, alert, and very feisty. The cub weighed 1.9 kg and was in good body condition. No injuries or problems were found on radiographs and blood work; Dr. Karra elected to not ear tag this bear due to his small size. Throughout the procedure, the bear acted appropriately fearful of humans. 

May 13, 2020

In the day following her admission, Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] was quiet but alert in her crate; Dr. Karra noted a small amount of blood around the bird's glottis [part of the bird's airway], indicating that the bird was still bleeding internally. The veterinary team continued offering the bird anti-inflammatories, medicated eyedrops, and fluids, while keeping the bird in a quiet location. On May 12, the eagle was a little brighter, and her respiratory rate was within normal limits. 

May 13, 2020

After completing a course of oral chelation therapy for lead intoxication, Bald Eaglet #20-0798 was moved to the tower of the A3 flight pen on May 9. On May 11, Dr. Karra checked on the bird and found that the young eaglet had lost weight and generally seemed more depressed than he had been before he moved outside. Dr. Karra moved the eaglet back into the Center's holding room and offered fluids and additional food. 

May 11, 2020

On May 8, Black Bear yearling #20-0188 was successfully released back to the wild! The veterinary team was able to successfully dart and sedate the yearling for his final physical examination; Dr. Ernesto noted that the bear was in excellent physical condition and weighed in at 18.6 kg. The bear's teeth were in excellent condition, and blood samples were taken for further diagnostics. The bear was tagged in both ears for release. 

May 11, 2020

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

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