News

December 26, 2018

It’s now a tradition at the Wildlife Center for the staff and volunteers to recount their most memorable moments of the year in a blog post. A variety of stories and memories of 2018 from the staff and volunteers of the Wildlife Center will be posted on the Center's blog between Christmas and New Year's Day; here is a complete list for 2018, just so you don't miss any posts!

 

December 13, 2018

Bald Eagle #18-3087 has been recovering well after surgery. On December 6, radiographs were taken to check on the healing progress of the eagle’s injured wing; the veterinary team found that the fracture was fairly well-aligned, with only mild displacement at the end of the fractured bone. The eagle started a course of physical therapy, as well as daily laser therapy. The bird has a limited range of motion in his injured wing, though by the end of each session, the veterinarians note an improvement in movement.

December 13, 2018

Bufflehead #18-3068 has been doing well in the Center’s aviary for the past two weeks; the duck continues to eat well and has gained 40 grams since admission. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie noted that the duck’s waterproofing has improved greatly, though the duck still needs additional waterproofing on top of her head.

If the bufflehead continues to do well and is fully waterproof in the next week, she should be able to be released just a few days before Christmas.

December 4, 2018

On December 3, Bald Eagle #18-2865 had a follow-up eye examination to check on the retinal tear that the veterinary team noted on admission. The eye appears stable, and, at this point, should not compromise the eagle’s eventual release. One additional eye examination is scheduled for later this month; the Center veterinarians typically like to observe raptor eye injuries for three months to ensure they aren’t deteriorating. 

December 4, 2018

On November 15, a severe ice storm hit Waynesboro, causing power outages and multiple downed trees and limbs.  A large tree limb fell on the roof of the bear pens, damaging the roof. The following day, the staff moved Black Bear cub #18-3024 [Orange/Yellow Tag] to a zinger crate in the Center’s isolation room; the staff did not want to introduce the bear to any other bears until the cub had another skin scraping to check for mange mites.

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