News

September 24, 2021

During the past month, Eastern Screech-Owl #21-1102 has been receiving regular exercising sessions with the rehabilitation staff in an outdoor flight pen. Initial exercise routines showed promising signs of the owl regaining physical stamina and proper form during flight, but during the past few weeks wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey reports that the bird may have reached a plateau. The owl resists flying during daily checks, and is unable to complete the prescribed number of passes within the enclosure.

September 22, 2021

Sadly, Bald Eagle #21-0677 was humanely euthanized on September 17. Despite the intensive care the veterinary and rehabilitation staff provided during the past five months, involving numerous techniques and medications, the eagle's carpal wounds repeatedly opened and showed signs of infection. Radiographs taken on September 17 indicated that the skeletal structures on the bird's left wing were becoming very affected, likely suffering from the associated wound infection.

September 17, 2021

On September 12, a private citizen found a young Turkey Vulture stuck in a large mud pit near a construction site in Charlottesville. The citizen contacted some friends and family, who quickly gathered resources to rescue the vulture and met her at the site. Working together, they placed boards down to form a safe path over the mud. After an hour of difficult progress, they were finally able to reach the vulture and free it from the mud. They bathed it to remove the mud and brought it to the Wildlife Center later that day.

September 15, 2021

On September 2, a private citizen in Hanover County witnessed an adult opossum fall off a staircase on the side of a building. On closer inspection, the opossum was found laying on the ground and did not move away when approached. Concerned that it may have been injured from the fall, he safely contained the opossum and brought it to Wellesley Animal Hospital. The following day, it was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

September 14, 2021

During the past month, Papa G'Ho has continued to rear Great Horned Owl fledglings #21-0308, #21-0292, and #21-0245 in outdoor flight pen A2. Critter Cam viewers have seen these young owls grow and develop while they practice flying, preening, perching, and socializing with one another. On September 1, the rehabilitation team began exercising the fledglings once per day. After several weeks of exercise and observation from the staff, wildlife rehabilitation intern Ben noted that all of the fledglings are progressing very well in building their physical stamina and flight techniques. 

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