News

June 12, 2019

On May 19, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted an immature Bald Eagle from Accomack County. The bird was seen standing on a woodpile for an extended amount of time; rescuers noted that the bird was often hanging his head and appeared to be unable to fly. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator before a registered volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Center.

June 10, 2019

Black Bear cub Orange Tag has been recovering from his forehead laceration; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon noted that the wound looked a little open over the weekend, though it appears as though it was a small area and no additional sutures were needed. Dr. Karra carefully applied a topical ointment to prevent flystrike.

June 10, 2019

On Friday, June 7, the Wildlife Center admitted a young adult male Black Bear from Rappahannock County. The bear had signs of severe mange and was able to be trapped and transported by a biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

June 7, 2019

Bog Turtle #19-0945 is healing well; the veterinary team has been happy to report that the turtle’s bars are intact and stable, and there has been no sign of infection at the site of the shell fractures. Last week, the rehabilitation staff introduced the turtle to a “boggier” enclosure; since the wounds are healing well, the turtle could be moved from a newspaper-based substrate to a more natural damp bark and water substrate.

June 7, 2019

The two Black Bear Cub sisters [No Tag and White Tag] are currently being fed just once a day; each cub gets a mush bowl, plus a shared “juvenile” bear meal that weighs six pounds! The juvenile meal contains fruits, veggies, seeds, greens, and dog food. The rehabilitation team reports that the two sisters are doing well and remain quite wild and feisty. The cubs are still being treated with a topical antifungal spray, though this treatment is increasingly difficult.

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