News

April 24, 2018

The Great Horned Owl family is doing well in Flight Pen 4; on Saturday, the oldest Great Horned Owlet [#18-0299] was let out of its crate. On Monday, April 23, the other two owlets came out of their crate. All three are exploring, making short flights, and are eating well. The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together; the bands will be removed this fall and replaced with permanent metal U.S. Fish & Wildlife bands prior to their release.

April 23, 2018

On April 19, Great Horned Owlet #18-0408 was admitted to the Wildlife Center from a group of permitted wildlife rehabilitators in the Richmond area. The young bird had been found on the ground in Chesterfield County on April 14; the owlet’s nest could not be found and it was not possible to reunite the young owlet was its parents.

April 23, 2018

Bald Eagle #18-0132 was transferred to a large outdoor flight pen on April 19. The eagle has been behaving normally and appears to be regaining physical strength, but will be housed alone until the additional samples taken during the past week are fully analyzed and no signs of Avian Pox are found. On April 20, the eagle began a daily physical conditioning regimen and will continue to be exercised during the coming weeks.

April 23, 2018

The five Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center; they continue to eat three times a day and are increasingly energetic and playful with one another. Brie reports that cub #18-0383, the newest cub admitted, has been a little more lethargic than the other cubs; he may just be settling in and adjusting to his new siblings, but the cub will have blood drawn later this week for another analysis.

April 23, 2018

During the past two weeks, Bald Eagle #18-0223 has received two more series of radiographs to check on the progress of her healing shoulder fracture. The radiographs taken on April 12 indicated that the eagle needed additional time in her body wrap in a small restricted space. On April 19, the veterinary team was pleased to find that the eagle had a stable callus on her fractured coracoid. The veterinarians also noted that the eagle’s leg laceration, which was present on admission, had opened once the scab over the wound fell off.

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