News

June 3, 2020

Last week, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon separated the remaining 14 bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, with the goal of keeping the smallest cubs away from the larger cubs. Based on weights and behavior, the current split includes: 

The littles: (housed in the left side of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure) 

June 3, 2020

On May 30, Bald Eagle #20-0994 finished its course of oral chelation therapy for the subclinical level of lead toxicity in the bird's system. The following day, the staff re-checked the lead levels and found a reduced level of 0.003 ppm -- just a little above the "low" reading. The eagle has been eating well, and has indicated its preference for fish. 

June 2, 2020

On May 29, Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] was moved to flight pen A1. In this larger space, she'll be able to start a daily exercise program, to get her back in shape and ready for release. 

 

June 2, 2020

All four Bald Eaglets are doing well in the large A3 flight pen. The newest eagles, #20-1128 [lime green bumpers] and #20-1129 [no color of bumpers] fledged from the tower over the weekend, and are exploring their larger area. The other eaglets, #20-0744 [purple bumpers] and #20-0833 [pink bumpers] are making short flights and hanging out on higher perches with adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. The eaglets will start a daily exercise program once they are older and all of their flight feathers have grown in; typically, young eagles are released toward the end of summer. 

June 2, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0172 is doing well in A3, currently serving as the role model for four young Bald Eaglets! The adult eagle is still exercised daily in preparation for release; currently the bird is flying an average of 8-14 passes each day. Overall, her flight is good, though the rehabilitation staff note that she needs more improvement on her stamina prior to release. 

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