Current Patients

Black Bear cubs #24-0136, #24-0137, and #24-0138

On February 14, the Wildlife Center admitted the first Black Bear cubs of 2024. The three cubs came from Orange County after their den was accidentally disturbed during brush clearing at a construction site; their mother ran off. The construction crew immediately stopped the equipment to contact DWR; a biologist was dispatched to assess the scene and decided that, even though the crew was willing to leave the den in place for the mother to return, because one of the cubs was injured and there was ongoing construction in the area, it was safer to transport the cubs to the Center.

Latest Update: February 22, 2024

During the past week, the rehabilitation staff have been coming into the Center ‘round-the-clock to feed the three young Black Bear cubs. The two healthy cubs have been growing at a rapid pace, with the male cub currently weighing 1035 grams and the female cub weighing 875 grams – each gaining more than 100g in a week!

Red Fox #23-3911

On December 1, a family from Richmond brought in a juvenile Red Fox. They had spotted the fox on their property a month prior to admission, and said that he was in such rough shape that they "could hardly tell he was a fox ... we realized he needed help, and after speaking with Center staff, we bought a humane trap and set it up with sardines as bait. The fox seemed scared the first time he approached the trap, but we covered it with leaves on our second attempt and had immediate success." Once captured, the family quickly transported the fox to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 7, 2024

Red Fox #23-3911 has made a full recovery since his last update! The veterinary team administered the final doses of antiparasitic medications on January 27, noting that the condition of the fur had been continually improving during treatments. On February 2, the alopecia and other mange-related symptoms had been completely resolved – his fur was thick, clean, and in good condition, and his skin was healthy and wound-free.

Black Bear cubs of 2023

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: January 23, 2024

During the past three months, the Black Bears have become much less active, and are settling into their dens for more extended periods of sleep during the cold weather periods. In the fall, the bears were consuming up to 90 pounds of food a day; at this point, the bears are eating about 44 pounds of food a day, with one weekly fast day (typically on Sundays).

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: October 25, 2023

The five Black Bear cubs have been doing well in the Center’s two-acre Bear Complex. In early September, the rehabilitation team began offering increased meal amounts to the cubs – twice per day, each cub receives approximately 12.5 lbs of fruit, vegetables and greens, and protein. In total, Center staff are preparing and delivering 125 lbs of food to the Black Bear Complex daily – 875 lbs per week!

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: August 9, 2023

Following the successful repair of the Black Bear Complex fence, the veterinary team started moving the Black Bear cubs of 2023 to the Black Bear Complex early in the morning on August 8!

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: August 1, 2023

On August 2, the veterinary and rehabilitation teams will move the Black Bear cubs of 2023 to the Black Bear Complex. Repairs and final checks of the half-acre outdoor enclosure were completed during the week of July 24, and all five cubs are ready to transition to the new space.

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: July 26, 2023

The five Black Bears have been doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure. The cubs continue to eat a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, insects, nuts, fish, seeds, and greens, and they also are regularly receiving some nice cool enrichment treats to help beat the heat and keep them entertained!

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: July 21, 2023

During July, the cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation [LMI] enclosure have continued to eat, grow, and play – and the rehabilitation staff have been adding frequent enrichment activities for the curious cubs. Recently, the cubs were treated to some “bobbing for fruit” activities as well as fishcicles!

 

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: July 6, 2023

The Black Bear cubs of 2023 are growing quickly, are nearly weaned off of bottle feeding, and have begun to explore both sides of the Center’s LMI enclosure. On July 4, wildlife rehabilitator Mac shared an update on the four cubs:

“Black Bear cub #23-0529 (one-ear) is up to 12 kg – we are planning to wean her from the bottle soon, but luckily she already seems to prefer solid foods. We’re still offering half of a bottle, or just a bottle of electrolytes without formula if she’s interested.

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: June 20, 2023

The Black Bear cubs of 2023 continue to do well within the Center's LMI enclosure during the past week. A detailed update from wildlife rehabilitator Mac describes that all of the cubs are eating well and gaining weight, and have recently been fully introduced to Black Bear cub #23-1605 (Double Orange):

"Cub #23-0529 (one-ear) is up to 8.58 kg this week from 7.03 kg last week. We are going to start weaning her off of the bottle this week.

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: June 14, 2023

The Black Bear cubs of 2023 have been doing well during the past week – the three female cubs have been very active in the Large Mammal enclosure and can regularly be seen on camera, wrestling, running, and climbing. They still interact frequently with their large duck plushie!

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2023

The Black Bear cubs of 2023 have been doing well during the past couple of weeks – playing, eating, and growing!

Wildlife rehabilitator Mac’s cub notes this week include:

#23-0829 [broken leg bear]: “She’s up to 8.3 kg and is quite a handful when trying to capture for weighing – she had Alex and me running around the enclosure and wrestling to get her into a crate!”

#23-0681: "This cub is up to 4.16 kg this week and is still receiving bottles of formula twice a day [in addition to mush bowls and meals], though she hasn’t been as interested in the bottle lately."

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: May 17, 2023

The three Black Bear cubs of 2023 are doing well and have been growing quickly. Cub #23-0529 [one ear] weighed in at 4.3 kg on May 15, and is still receiving bottles, mush bowls, and juvenile bear meals twice per day. Rehabilitation Team Lead Mac notes that the cub is highly energetic and is adjusting well to living side-by-side with Black Bear cubs #23-0681 and #23-0829 within the LMI 1 enclosure.  

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: May 10, 2023

The Black Bear cubs of 2023 have been doing well during the past week. Black Bear #23-0529 [one ear] continues to be one of the more active cubs, and is very vocal throughout the day. She is eating well and gaining weight -- on May 8, she weighed in at 3.65 kg. Rehabilitation staff have transitioned to bottle feeding her twice per day while still offering mush bowls and juvenile bear meals twice per day. On May 3, she was transitioned into the full LMI 1 enclosure.

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: May 3, 2023

Black Bear cub #23-0529 [one ear] is doing well, and has been quite active in LMI during the past week. Rehabilitation Team Lead Mac reports that the cub is extremely interested in interacting with Black Bear cub #23-0681 [two ears], and has continued to show pacing behaviors in her enclosure outside of supervised playtime. She’s eating well and gaining weight – she regularly consumes 100% of the bottles that are offered three times per day, and usually eats solid foods overnight.

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: April 27, 2023

The first cub of 2023, #23-0529,  has continued to do well during the past week. In addition to daily bottle feeding, the one-eared cub is now eating from mush bowls that the rehab team leaves for her, and she has increased in weight to 2.86kg. The rehab team notes that the cub has been intermittently pacing in her enclosure, likely because she does not have another cub to interact with. To provide socialization until cub #23-0681 can join her in LMI, the rehab team takes time to orchestrate "supervised" playtime each day. Take a look!

In April 2023, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2024, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: April 17, 2023

The first Black Bear cub of 2023 has been doing very well during the past week. Rehabilitation staff report that she responds excellently to bottle feeding, and almost always finishes the entire bottle during each feeding session three times per day. While the cub hasn’t shown much interest in bowl-feeding at this point, staff will continue to offer “mush bowls” twice per day. Black Bear cub #23-0529’s body condition has improved during the past week, as well – her most recent weight was 2.66 kg.

Northern Bobwhite #23-3913

Last week, the Wildlife Center admitted an animal that rarely comes through our doors -- a Northern Bobwhite! The bobwhite had been found in the middle of an intersection in Essex County after she was likely hit by a car.

Latest Update: January 23, 2024

Throughout December, Northern Bobwhite #23-3913 continued to improve. By January 1, the bird's fracture had completely healed and the rehab team noted that the bobwhite was able to walk and fly well. The bobwhite was moved to one of the Center's large outdoor aviaries so she could continue to rebuild her strength. 

On January 8, the vet team examined the bobwhite and officially cleared her for release. The bobwhite was released on January 11 at a large field in Essex County, close to where she was originally rescued. 

Eastern American Toad #23-3756

On October 28, a local resident discovered an Eastern American Toad on her porch with bleeding lacerations on its back. The resident contained the toad, rinsed its wounds with distilled water, and made sure to keep it moist overnight. The next day, they brought the toad to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Bald Eagle #23-0749

On April 23, two Bald Eagles were seen fighting in King William County, Virginia. One bird flew off and was unable to be caught, but the second large eagle was found down on the ground with several wounds on her face and feet. The bird was taken to Tidewater Wildlife Rescue for stabilization, and transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia for treatment the following day.

Latest Update: October 31, 2023

During the past month, Bald Eagle #23-0749 has continued to make slow but steady progress. On September 21, the eagle was moved to the Center's A3 flight pen. Rehab staff report that the bird still has a number of damaged feathers on both her left and right wing, however, her new tail feathers are growing in well and her right-wing droop is no longer present.

On April 23, two Bald Eagles were seen fighting in King William County, Virginia. One bird flew off and was unable to be caught, but the second large eagle was found down on the ground with several wounds on her face and feet. The bird was taken to Tidewater Wildlife Rescue for stabilization, and transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia for treatment the following day.

Latest Update: September 14, 2023

During the past two months, Bald Eagle #23-0749 has continued her rehabilitation in the A1 enclosure. After several weeks of laser and physical therapy, the rehab team reported that the range of motion in the eagle's right wing had improved. The bird's flight was also showing signs of improvement during daily exercise sessions. 

On April 23, two Bald Eagles were seen fighting in King William County, Virginia. One bird flew off and was unable to be caught, but the second large eagle was found down on the ground with several wounds on her face and feet. The bird was taken to Tidewater Wildlife Rescue for stabilization, and transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia for treatment the following day.

Latest Update: July 14, 2023

During the past three weeks, Bald Eagle #23-0749 has continued to recuperate in the Center’s A1 flight pen. During daily exercise, rehabilitation staff report that the bird is able to complete between 6-10 passes of the enclosure. Her physical stamina has improved during recent weeks, but a noticeable right wing droop has been observed following exercise sessions. Repeat radiographs performed on June 26 showed thickening of the soft tissue surrounding the bird’s right patagium – a condition previously noted upon the eagle’s admission, and likely the result of an older injury in the wild.

On April 23, two Bald Eagles were seen fighting in King William County, Virginia. One bird flew off and was unable to be caught, but the second large eagle was found down on the ground with several wounds on her face and feet. The bird was taken to Tidewater Wildlife Rescue for stabilization, and transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia for treatment the following day.

Latest Update: June 22, 2023

Bald Eagle #23-0749 has been slowly improving during the past month. On June 5, the eagle was transferred to the Center’s A1 flight pen. Within this large enclosure, she receives daily exercise with the rehabilitation staff and is currently able to complete 5-10 passes before showing signs of exhaustion.  

Bald Eagle #23-3558

On September 27, King George County Animal Control responded to a call from an anonymous number regarding a Bald Eagle that had been hit by a car. An animal control officer contained the injured bird and brought it to permitted wildlife rehabilitator Deb Woodward; Deb provided supportive care for the eagle and arranged transport to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following day.

Black Bear 23-2442

On July 11, a young bear cub was found, along a road in Fauquier County, beside her deceased mother. Rescuers contacted the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, and the bear was admitted the following morning to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Black Bear cub #23-1605 [Double Orange]

On June 2, a Black Bear cub was seen alone in a tree in Bedford County. After no sign of a sow was observed in the area for three days, Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources biologists determined the cub had been orphaned, and transported it to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on the evening of June 5.

Black Bear cub #23-0829

In the early afternoon on April 27, a railway conductor in Tazewell County saw a young bear cub near the bodies of a deceased sow and cub that had likely been hit by a train. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources staff were alerted, and the cub was safely captured in a nearby creek after running away during the rescue attempt. The cub was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that same day.

Latest Update: May 10, 2023

The Black Bear cubs of 2023 have been doing well during the past week. Black Bear #23-0529 [one ear] continues to be one of the more active cubs, and is very vocal throughout the day. She is eating well and gaining weight -- on May 8, she weighed in at 3.65 kg. Rehabilitation staff have transitioned to bottle feeding her twice per day while still offering mush bowls and juvenile bear meals twice per day. On May 3, she was transitioned into the full LMI 1 enclosure.

Black Bear cub #23-0681

On April 17, a private citizen observed a young Black Bear cub by itself near a roadway in Franklin County, Virginia. After several hours, no sign of a sow was seen in the area and the private citizen contained the cub on their own, coming into direct physical contact with the bear in the process. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources biologists were later called to the scene, received the cub, and transported it to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: May 10, 2023

The Black Bear cubs of 2023 have been doing well during the past week. Black Bear #23-0529 [one ear] continues to be one of the more active cubs, and is very vocal throughout the day. She is eating well and gaining weight -- on May 8, she weighed in at 3.65 kg. Rehabilitation staff have transitioned to bottle feeding her twice per day while still offering mush bowls and juvenile bear meals twice per day. On May 3, she was transitioned into the full LMI 1 enclosure.

On April 17, a private citizen observed a young Black Bear cub by itself near a roadway in Franklin County, Virginia. After several hours, no sign of a sow was seen in the area and the private citizen contained the cub on their own, coming into direct physical contact with the bear in the process. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources biologists were later called to the scene, received the cub, and transported it to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: May 3, 2023

Black Bear cub #23-0529 [one ear] is doing well, and has been quite active in LMI during the past week. Rehabilitation Team Lead Mac reports that the cub is extremely interested in interacting with Black Bear cub #23-0681 [two ears], and has continued to show pacing behaviors in her enclosure outside of supervised playtime. She’s eating well and gaining weight – she regularly consumes 100% of the bottles that are offered three times per day, and usually eats solid foods overnight.

On April 17, a private citizen observed a young Black Bear cub by itself near a roadway in Franklin County, Virginia. After several hours, no sign of a sow was seen in the area and the private citizen contained the cub on their own, coming into direct physical contact with the bear in the process. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources biologists were later called to the scene, received the cub, and transported it to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: April 27, 2023

The first cub of 2023, #23-0529,  has continued to do well during the past week. In addition to daily bottle feeding, the one-eared cub is now eating from mush bowls that the rehab team leaves for her, and she has increased in weight to 2.86kg. The rehab team notes that the cub has been intermittently pacing in her enclosure, likely because she does not have another cub to interact with. To provide socialization until cub #23-0681 can join her in LMI, the rehab team takes time to orchestrate "supervised" playtime each day. Take a look!

Black Bear cub #23-0529

On the evening of April 8, the first Black Bear cub of 2023 was admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia. After the lone cub had been observed for several days near a river in Bristol, Virginia with no sign of a sow in the area, Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources biologist rescued the cub and transported it to the Center.

Latest Update: May 10, 2023

The Black Bear cubs of 2023 have been doing well during the past week. Black Bear #23-0529 [one ear] continues to be one of the more active cubs, and is very vocal throughout the day. She is eating well and gaining weight -- on May 8, she weighed in at 3.65 kg. Rehabilitation staff have transitioned to bottle feeding her twice per day while still offering mush bowls and juvenile bear meals twice per day. On May 3, she was transitioned into the full LMI 1 enclosure.

On the evening of April 8, the first Black Bear cub of 2023 was admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia. After the lone cub had been observed for several days near a river in Bristol, Virginia with no sign of a sow in the area, Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources biologist rescued the cub and transported it to the Center.

Latest Update: May 3, 2023

Black Bear cub #23-0529 [one ear] is doing well, and has been quite active in LMI during the past week. Rehabilitation Team Lead Mac reports that the cub is extremely interested in interacting with Black Bear cub #23-0681 [two ears], and has continued to show pacing behaviors in her enclosure outside of supervised playtime. She’s eating well and gaining weight – she regularly consumes 100% of the bottles that are offered three times per day, and usually eats solid foods overnight.

On the evening of April 8, the first Black Bear cub of 2023 was admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia. After the lone cub had been observed for several days near a river in Bristol, Virginia with no sign of a sow in the area, Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources biologist rescued the cub and transported it to the Center.

Latest Update: April 27, 2023

The first cub of 2023, #23-0529,  has continued to do well during the past week. In addition to daily bottle feeding, the one-eared cub is now eating from mush bowls that the rehab team leaves for her, and she has increased in weight to 2.86kg. The rehab team notes that the cub has been intermittently pacing in her enclosure, likely because she does not have another cub to interact with. To provide socialization until cub #23-0681 can join her in LMI, the rehab team takes time to orchestrate "supervised" playtime each day. Take a look!

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