Current Patients

Bald Eagle #22-0261

On March 20, the Center admitted an adult Bald Eagle that was hit by a car in Henrico County. The eagle was scavenging a deer carcass on the side of the road, and, when it attempted to fly away, it was struck by the vehicle. A Henrico County police officer was dispatched to the scene and found that the eagle was unable to fly and appeared to have trauma to its left wing. The officer captured the eagle, and a volunteer transported the bird to the Center later that day. 

Latest Update: May 23, 2022

After a flight assessment from the rehabilitation staff and examination from the veterinary team, Bald Eagle #22-0261 has been cleared for release!

On March 20, the Center admitted an adult Bald Eagle that was hit by a car in Henrico County. The eagle was scavenging a deer carcass on the side of the road, and, when it attempted to fly away, it was struck by the vehicle. A Henrico County police officer was dispatched to the scene and found that the eagle was unable to fly and appeared to have trauma to its left wing. The officer captured the eagle, and a volunteer transported the bird to the Center later that day. 

Latest Update: May 10, 2022

During the past month, the veterinary team has continued to treat Bald Eagle #22-0261 with a combination of bandage changes, anti-inflammatory medication, and chelation therapy. On April 4, the veterinary team anesthetized the eagle to take repeat radiographs of its left wing. The radiographs revealed bony callus formation around its fracture, a sign that the fracture is healing. While the eagle was anesthetized, the veterinary team also took a blood sample and ran an in-house lead test.

Black Bear cubs of 2022

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: May 17, 2022

The first two Black Bear cubs of 2022 are doing well -- both are eating and gaining weight! With consistently warmer temperatures, both bears were moved to the Center's Large Mammal enclosure on May 11. They were transported in the Center's brand-new Polaris!

Black Bear cub #22-1087

On the afternoon of Sunday, May 15, a small Black Bear cub was rescued from a tree in Salem, Virginia. The bear had been seen in the same tree for 36 hours with no sign of a sow. The cub was first taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for overnight care, then transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning. 

Great Horned Owlet #22-0490

On April 14, the Center admitted two juvenile Great Horned Owls that were transferred from permitted wildlife rehabilitator Susan Shepperson. Both owlets are suspected orphans and were transferred to the Center to be paired with Papa G’Ho, the Center’s ambassador Great Horned Owl who acts as a surrogate parent to orphaned Great Horned Owls.

Latest Update: May 11, 2022

On May 7, the veterinary team took repeat radiographs of Great Horned Owlet #22-0489's right wing and discovered that the bird's ulna had fragmented at the site where the surgical pin was inserted. The radiographs also showed significant bony changes in the owlet's rights carpus, resulting in a very limited range of motion. Sadly, there was no form of treatment that could repair these injuries. The veterinary team made the decision to humanely euthanize the owlet.

On April 14, the Center admitted two juvenile Great Horned Owls that were transferred from permitted wildlife rehabilitator Susan Shepperson. Both owlets are suspected orphans and were transferred to the Center to be paired with Papa G’Ho, the Center’s ambassador Great Horned Owl who acts as a surrogate parent to orphaned Great Horned Owls.

Latest Update: May 5, 2022

Great Horned Owlet #22-0294

Great Horned Owlet #22-0508

On April 15, a private citizen found a Great Horned Owl nestling on the ground in Orange, Virginia. The citizen found two nests in the surrounding area, but they were located very far from where the owlet was found and close monitoring did not reveal any nest activity or indication that adults were present. The owlet was brought to the Center for rehabilitative care. 

Black Bear cub #22-0685

On April 26, property owners in Greene County found a young Black Bear cub in their barn, under a tractor, just hours after a severe storm rolled through central Virginia. There were no signs of the mother bear that evening or the next morning, and after a discussion with the Department of Wildlife Resources, the rescuers brought the cub to the Wildlife Center on April 27. 

Latest Update: May 6, 2022

During the past week, Black Bear cub #22-0685’s condition has improved. Rehabilitation staff report that the cub was happy to eat his meal on the morning of May 1 after being transitioned back to a Zinger crate near Black Bear cub #22-0462. The cub is still underweight and in thin body condition, but his appetite has continued to grow throughout the week, resulting in a slight increase in weight. On May 5, the cub weighed in at 1.70 kg -- 30 g heavier than his intake weight of 1.40 kg.

Great Horned Owlet #22-0294

On March 11, a private citizen in Moyock, North Carolina found a fledgling Great Horned Owl on the ground. When the citizen attempted to re-nest the bird, they found three dead siblings in the nest, a strong indicator that the owlet was orphaned. The rescuer brought the owlet to permitted wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher in Chesapeake, Virginia for an initial evaluation.

Latest Update: May 5, 2022

Great Horned Owlet #22-0294

Black Bear cub #22-0462

On April 11, a private citizen in Augusta County saw a young Black Bear cub in a tree near a residential area. Following a period of observation, no adult bears were seen in the area. The concerned citizen captured the cub on their own, fed the cub an unknown amount of cow’s milk, and began driving with the bear toward the Wildlife Center for assistance. While en route, the rescuer contacted the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for further guidance.

Latest Update: May 3, 2022

During the past eight days, Black Bear cub #22-0462 has continued to receive care at the Wildlife Center of Virginia and is doing well. In between scheduled feedings, the cub has been spending time in a large zinger crate in a small quiet space. 

On April 11, a private citizen in Augusta County saw a young Black Bear cub in a tree near a residential area. Following a period of observation, no adult bears were seen in the area. The concerned citizen captured the cub on their own, fed the cub an unknown amount of cow’s milk, and began driving with the bear toward the Wildlife Center for assistance. While en route, the rescuer contacted the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for further guidance.

Latest Update: April 25, 2022

It’s been two weeks since Black Bear cub #22-0462’s admission; during that time, Wildlife Center staff have been in close contact with biologists at the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources to discuss options for finding another bear friend for this young cub. Raising young mammals together at a vulnerable stage in their development is an important part of rehabilitation; whether natural siblings or introduced ones, infant and young juvenile mammals received comfort and learn preliminary social skills when raised together.

On April 11, a private citizen in Augusta County saw a young Black Bear cub in a tree near a residential area. Following a period of observation, no adult bears were seen in the area. The concerned citizen captured the cub on their own, fed the cub an unknown amount of cow’s milk, and began driving with the bear toward the Wildlife Center for assistance. While en route, the rescuer contacted the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for further guidance.

Latest Update: April 22, 2022

Black Bear cub #22-0462 has been settling in well during the past week. Wildlife rehabilitation supervisor Kelsey reports that the cub wants nothing to do with his bottle of formula, but is readily eating his thickened formula from a mush bowl three times a day. As of April 21, the cub weighs 3.08 kg.

Gray Treefrog #22-0610

On April 24, the Center admitted an adult Gray Treefrog from Henrico County. The frog was found on a table in a private citizen's backyard and appeared to have an injured leg. On admission, the front-desk staff immediately placed the frog in a specialized holding container to keep the frog’s skin moist until the veterinary team could examine it.

Eastern Ratsnake #21-3630

On the morning of November 11, a private citizen found an Eastern Ratsnake stuck in an air vent in their home in Ruckersville, Virginia.  The snake had entered the ductwork from an unknown access point and managed to squeeze the first few inches of its body through the grille of the air vent before becoming stuck.  The concerned citizen carefully detached the entire vent from the floor, contacted the Wildlife Center for assistance, and transported the snake to the Center where veterinary staff could safely remove it from the vent.

Latest Update: January 26, 2022

Eastern Ratsnake #21-3630 continues its rehabilitation process at the Wildlife Center of Virginia after it was admitted more than two months ago.  The laceration that the patient had sustained from being trapped in the air vent has healed appropriately, and the snake recently shed without complications.  Often, injuries to the body and scales of a snake can make a successful shed more difficult.

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: November 30, 2021

In August, Dr. Karra made the official decision that Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 was non-releasable due to permanent neurologic deficits. Since the outreach department has been open to accepting a new education screech-owl ambassador, Vice President for Outreach & Education Amanda decided to start an assessment to see if this owl could be a good fit.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: July 22, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been doing well in his enclosure, along with several other young screech-owls. The bird no longer has any discernable head tilt, can successfully feed himself, and has been able to move to different perches within the enclosure. Within the past two weeks, the staff began a regular exercise program for all young owlets, in preparation for releasing them sometime during August. Unfortunately, the staff quickly discovered that, in a larger flight space, the Eastern Screech-Owl is having difficulty flying and navigating a larger space.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: June 22, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been doing well in one of the Center's B-pens, along with three other owlets. The owlet's severe head tilt has improved in the past two weeks, though a slight head tilt remains. The owlet has not yet started a daily exercise program since its flight feathers are still growing, but the rehabilitation staff have observed the young bird making short flights around the small flight enclosure.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: June 2, 2021

During the past two weeks, the veterinary team has carefully monitored Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 for signs of improvement. The young bird still has a significant head tilt, though the team feels that there was a slight improvement after multiple weeks of wearing a small neck brace. Another lead text on May 26 revealed a "low" level, indicating that perhaps the lead has finally been removed from the young bird's system. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: May 19, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been continuing to recover from lead toxicity and associated neurologic issues. The young owl has had a number of lead tests to re-check blood lead levels; while some tests have returned at "low" levels, subsequent tests revealed an elevated level of lead again. Since lead accumulates in the bones of affected birds, treating lead in some individuals can be a prolonged process. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: May 6, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has remained in the Center's indoor Hold area during the past 11 days, where veterinary staff have been keeping a close watch on the bird's overall condition. On May 5, an secondary set of radiographs were taken, identifying a skull fracture that the veterinarians suspected may have been present on admission. While the precise circumstance of this injury is not known, it's possible that lead toxicity left this fledgling owl more susceptible to physical trauma. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: April 26, 2021

During the past week, Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has made some slow improvements. The little owl no longer requires oxygen therapy and is able to be housed in a crate, where the bird is generally quiet, alert, and reactive. The owl still has a significant head tilt, which has made feeding an enormous challenge. The owl can ingest very small pieces of food and is able to partially hold onto larger pieces of food and tear off small soft bites.

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