Current Patients

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: November 30, 2021

In August, Dr. Karra made the official decision that Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 was non-releasable due to permanent neurologic deficits. Since the outreach department has been open to accepting a new education screech-owl ambassador, Vice President for Outreach & Education Amanda decided to start an assessment to see if this owl could be a good fit.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: July 22, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been doing well in his enclosure, along with several other young screech-owls. The bird no longer has any discernable head tilt, can successfully feed himself, and has been able to move to different perches within the enclosure. Within the past two weeks, the staff began a regular exercise program for all young owlets, in preparation for releasing them sometime during August. Unfortunately, the staff quickly discovered that, in a larger flight space, the Eastern Screech-Owl is having difficulty flying and navigating a larger space.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: June 22, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been doing well in one of the Center's B-pens, along with three other owlets. The owlet's severe head tilt has improved in the past two weeks, though a slight head tilt remains. The owlet has not yet started a daily exercise program since its flight feathers are still growing, but the rehabilitation staff have observed the young bird making short flights around the small flight enclosure.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: June 2, 2021

During the past two weeks, the veterinary team has carefully monitored Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 for signs of improvement. The young bird still has a significant head tilt, though the team feels that there was a slight improvement after multiple weeks of wearing a small neck brace. Another lead text on May 26 revealed a "low" level, indicating that perhaps the lead has finally been removed from the young bird's system. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: May 19, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been continuing to recover from lead toxicity and associated neurologic issues. The young owl has had a number of lead tests to re-check blood lead levels; while some tests have returned at "low" levels, subsequent tests revealed an elevated level of lead again. Since lead accumulates in the bones of affected birds, treating lead in some individuals can be a prolonged process. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: May 6, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has remained in the Center's indoor Hold area during the past 11 days, where veterinary staff have been keeping a close watch on the bird's overall condition. On May 5, an secondary set of radiographs were taken, identifying a skull fracture that the veterinarians suspected may have been present on admission. While the precise circumstance of this injury is not known, it's possible that lead toxicity left this fledgling owl more susceptible to physical trauma. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: April 26, 2021

During the past week, Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has made some slow improvements. The little owl no longer requires oxygen therapy and is able to be housed in a crate, where the bird is generally quiet, alert, and reactive. The owl still has a significant head tilt, which has made feeding an enormous challenge. The owl can ingest very small pieces of food and is able to partially hold onto larger pieces of food and tear off small soft bites.

Virginia Opossum #21-3141

On September 2, a private citizen in Hanover County witnessed an adult opossum fall off a staircase on the side of a building. On closer inspection, the opossum was found laying on the ground and did not move away when approached. Concerned that it may have been injured from the fall, he safely contained the opossum and brought it to Wellesley Animal Hospital. The following day, it was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 24, 2021

During the month of October, opossum #21-3141 received two more courses of chelation therapy to remove the lead in his system. A repeat lead test performed on October 31 came back positive for lead, though the result of 0.034 ppm indicated a much lower subclinical level. Normally, the veterinary team would continue chelation therapy until all of the lead in a patient’s system is removed. However, because this opossum had undergone five courses of chelation therapy, which can be hard on the kidneys, they decided not to administer another round of treatment to remove the remaining lead. 

On September 2, a private citizen in Hanover County witnessed an adult opossum fall off a staircase on the side of a building. On closer inspection, the opossum was found laying on the ground and did not move away when approached. Concerned that it may have been injured from the fall, he safely contained the opossum and brought it to Wellesley Animal Hospital. The following day, it was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: October 20, 2021

Opossum #21-3141’s first course of chelation therapy successfully removed some of the lead in his system. However, subsequent lead tests performed on September 24 and October 4 showed that his lead levels are increasing. The veterinary team suspects that this is because the opossum had long-term exposure to lead before he was admitted to the Center. When lead is first absorbed into the body, it circulates in the blood, but if that lead is not removed then over time it becomes stored in the bones.

Bald Eagle #21-3026

On August 22, a private citizen in Temperanceville, Virginia found an adult Bald Eagle stuck in a wastewater treatment pond. The eagle was covered in grease and unable to fly. The citizen contacted permitted wildlife rehabilitator Jodie Sokel, who drove to the treatment pond and captured the eagle. The eagle was transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning. 

Latest Update: November 23, 2021

During the past three weeks, Center staff have been closely observing Bald Eagle #21-3026. While the imping procedure completed on October 26 was successful, both the veterinary and rehabilitation staff have confirmed that all three donor feathers have since fallen out or have been chewed off. Fortunately, the staff have observed new feather growth in the damaged areas during the past few weeks.

On August 22, a private citizen in Temperanceville, Virginia found an adult Bald Eagle stuck in a wastewater treatment pond. The eagle was covered in grease and unable to fly. The citizen contacted permitted wildlife rehabilitator Jodie Sokel, who drove to the treatment pond and captured the eagle. The eagle was transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning. 

Latest Update: November 4, 2021

Throughout October, Bald Eagle #21-3026 has been housed in flight pen A3 where Center staff have closely monitored the bird during exercise sessions and have not seen her flying. On October 26, the veterinary team anesthetized the eagle to take radiographs and “imp” her wing feathers. 

Bald Eagle #21-1030

Bald Eagle #21-1030 was admitted to the Wildlife Center on May 7 after she was found at a landfill in King and Queen County, Virginia. Upon admission, the veterinarians noted that this eagle was quiet, but alert and responsive. During the physical exam, former veterinary intern Dr. Sarah found scarring and discoloration in the eagle’s left eye, but the patient appeared to still have functioning eyesight. This eagle also had a large wound on the left elbow with crusted dirt and discharge which, after being removed, revealed necrotic muscle tissue.

Latest Update: November 22, 2021

During the past month, Bald Eagle #21-1030’s carpal wounds have shown significant improvement. On October 27, the veterinary team moved the eagle to the Center’s A2 flight pen, a larger flight pen compared to A3 that will ideally prevent the bird from damaging its carpal injuries further during daily exercise routines. 

Bald Eagle #21-1030 was admitted to the Wildlife Center on May 7 after she was found at a landfill in King and Queen County, Virginia. Upon admission, the veterinarians noted that this eagle was quiet, but alert and responsive. During the physical exam, former veterinary intern Dr. Sarah found scarring and discoloration in the eagle’s left eye, but the patient appeared to still have functioning eyesight. This eagle also had a large wound on the left elbow with crusted dirt and discharge which, after being removed, revealed necrotic muscle tissue.

Latest Update: October 23, 2021

During the past two months, the veterinary team continued to treat Bald Eagle #21-1030’s carpal wounds. On September 10, they moved the eagle to the Center’s A3 flight pen to give her more space, which will help reduce her stress in captivity and lessen her chances of bumping her wings and aggravating the wounds. After months of bandage changes and daily treatment with topical ointments and antiseptics, the eagle’s carpal wounds appear much improved, though the prognosis is still guarded.

Bald Eagle #21-1030 was admitted to the Wildlife Center on May 7 after she was found at a landfill in King and Queen County, Virginia. Upon admission, the veterinarians noted that this eagle was quiet, but alert and responsive. During the physical exam, former veterinary intern Dr. Sarah found scarring and discoloration in the eagle’s left eye, but the patient appeared to still have functioning eyesight. This eagle also had a large wound on the left elbow with crusted dirt and discharge which, after being removed, revealed necrotic muscle tissue.

Latest Update: August 25, 2021

The veterinary team continues to manage Bald Eagle #21-1030's carpal injuries. The treatment of this eagle has been challenging; while the bird's right carpus is showing solid signs of improvement and healing, the left carpus has needed several surgical procedures to manage the large wound in this high-tension area of the bird's wing. The team will assess the prognosis for this bird in the coming weeks. 

Bald Eagle #21-1030 was admitted to the Wildlife Center on May 7 after she was found at a landfill in King and Queen County, Virginia. Upon admission, the veterinarians noted that this eagle was quiet, but alert and responsive. During the physical exam, former veterinary intern Dr. Sarah found scarring and discoloration in the eagle’s left eye, but the patient appeared to still have functioning eyesight. This eagle also had a large wound on the left elbow with crusted dirt and discharge which, after being removed, revealed necrotic muscle tissue.

Latest Update: July 22, 2021

The veterinary team has continued to manage Bald Eagle #21-1030's significant carpal injuries this month; these wounds have proven to be very challenging, given the high-tension area and movement of the bird's "wrists". On July 21, the veterinary staff anesthetized the eagle to carefully debride the wounds and resuture them closed. Treatment will continue, though the bird's prognosis is guarded. 

Bald Eagle #21-1030 was admitted to the Wildlife Center on May 7 after she was found at a landfill in King and Queen County, Virginia. Upon admission, the veterinarians noted that this eagle was quiet, but alert and responsive. During the physical exam, former veterinary intern Dr. Sarah found scarring and discoloration in the eagle’s left eye, but the patient appeared to still have functioning eyesight. This eagle also had a large wound on the left elbow with crusted dirt and discharge which, after being removed, revealed necrotic muscle tissue.

Latest Update: July 5, 2021

During the past week, Bald Bald Eagle #21-1030 has been closely monitored during daily treatments. The veterinary staff clean and flush the eagle's wounds with iodine, apply new bandages, and administer pain and anti-inflammatory medications. On June 29, it was noted that necrotic tissue was present near a wound on the bird's right wrist -- an injury that was present upon admission to the Center on May 7 -- and Dr. Karra performed a surgical debridement of the area on June 30. After surgery, a wing wrap was applied to temporarily immobilize the area during recovery. 

Bald Eagle #21-1030 was admitted to the Wildlife Center on May 7 after she was found at a landfill in King and Queen County, Virginia. Upon admission, the veterinarians noted that this eagle was quiet, but alert and responsive. During the physical exam, former veterinary intern Dr. Sarah found scarring and discoloration in the eagle’s left eye, but the patient appeared to still have functioning eyesight. This eagle also had a large wound on the left elbow with crusted dirt and discharge which, after being removed, revealed necrotic muscle tissue.

Latest Update: June 24, 2021

At the beginning of June, Bald Eagle #21-1030 started making some short, low flights in the A3 flight enclosure, stretching her wings and starting to regain a little stamina. Unfortunately, a routine foot and feather check on June 7 revealed that the eagle once again had an abscess on her injured left elbow. The veterinary team brought the bird into the Center's treatment room to carefully drain the abscess and flush and treat the injured area. The bird was placed back in a crate in the Center's holding room. 

Eastern Ratsnake #21-3630

On the morning of November 11, a private citizen found an Eastern Ratsnake stuck in an air vent in their home in Ruckersville, Virginia.  The snake had entered the ductwork from an unknown access point and managed to squeeze the first few inches of its body through the grille of the air vent before becoming stuck.  The concerned citizen carefully detached the entire vent from the floor, contacted the Wildlife Center for assistance, and transported the snake to the Center where veterinary staff could safely remove it from the vent.

Black Bear cubs of 2021

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: October 12, 2021

The five Black Bear cubs in the Center's Bear Complex have been eating and growing during these past couple of months. Now that fall has arrived, the cubs have entered hyperphagia, a period of excessive eating and drinking to fatten up before winter arrives. In the wild, bears spent up to 20 hours a day eating a variety of calorie-dense foods that will help supply them with 20,000 calories a day or more.  

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: August 5, 2021

The five Black Bear cubs are settling in well to their yard in the Black Bear Complex. Despite the thick growth of trees and shrubs in the yard, Critter Cam viewers are typically able to spot the cubs multiple times a day, particularly when the cubs are eating together. 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: August 5, 2021

The five Black Bear cubs are settling in well to their yard in the Black Bear Complex. Despite the thick growth of trees and shrubs in the yard, Critter Cam viewers are typically able to spot the cubs multiple times a day, particularly when the cubs are eating together. 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: July 29, 2021

The five Black Bear cubs were successfully moved to yard #1 in the Black Bear Complex on Wednesday, July 28. A couple of the bears were anesthetized for a physical examination and ear tagging; other bears were simply loaded into a Zinger crate and then loaded onto the Center's electric vehicle for transport. 

The bears were all placed in the transition yard, a smaller portion of the bear yard where they could safely wake up and recover. After all were awake and ready to explore, the rehabilitation staff opened the adjoining gate into the main portion of the bear yard. 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: July 23, 2021

All work has been completed at the Black Bear Complex, and one of the rehabilitation externs, Ben, is putting the finishing touches on a newly constructed tire bridge for the cubs! Ben spent this week creating a sturdy chain of tires that will be hung between two trees. 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: July 8, 2021

On July 4, wildlife rehabilitator Katie noted that the nails on the front paws of Black Bear #21-1097 [Red Tag] appeared to be abnormally angled. Dr. Jenn was able to more carefully examined the cub under anesthesia and noted many of the cub's nails had broken or split and started to regrow, giving them a more crooked appearance. It's likely that the bear's climbing and roughhousing contributed to the condition of the nails. 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: June 8, 2021

Throughout the weekend, wildlife rehabilitation intern Ben carefully monitored Black Bear cub #21-0545 and worked through a method of delivering all of the bear's new medication in small servings of tasty formula "mush". On Saturday, Ben noted that the bear seemed calmer and was pacing less, though her paw wounds appeared to be bothering her. On Sunday, the bear also seemed to decrease her pacing behavior and was spotted cuddled with two other cubs on top of one of the climbing stumps in the Large Mammal enclosure. 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: June 4, 2021

The staff have continued to carefully assess Black Bear cub #21-0545 and her increased amount of pacing. Sadly, the medication that the veterinary team started on June 3 seems to have had no effect. The staff will try one more different type of medication to see if that provides any relief. Since the Bear Pen seemed to make no difference for the young cub, the rehabilitation staff moved the bear back to the Large Mammal enclosure for observation. 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: June 3, 2021

Now that the total number of Black Bear cubs is up to five, and the smallest cubs of the group weighed in at about 5 kg this past week, the rehabilitation staff decided to open both sides of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure and allow the cubs to have more space to explore and climb. The cubs are currently ranging in size from 5.35 kg (#21-1097) to 8.10 kg (#21-0705). 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: May 19, 2021

The four Black Bear cubs of 2021 are doing well in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The littlest cub, #21-01097, has been living in a Zinger crate in between feedings to ensure that he isn't able to slip out of the enclosure; on May 19, wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey decided that the cub was now large enough to roam with the other cubs. 

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Latest Update: May 12, 2021

The three Black Bear cubs have been doing well during the past few weeks; each cub is gaining weight and eating well. Current weights and feeding schedules are: 

Cub #0705: 4.26 kg, bowl-fed twice a day

Cub #0592: 2.80 kg, bottle-fed three times a day

Cub #0545: 4.10 kg, bowl-fed twice a day

Black Bear cub #21-0545

On April 16, a young Black Bear cub was found in Floyd County, Virginia, attempting to eat a homeowner's sweet feed (goat food). The homeowner waited several hours to see if the sow would return to claim her cub; but after a few hours with no sign of the bear's mother, the bear cub was first taken to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. A biologist with the Department of Wildlife Resources checked the area for den sites but was unable to find any sign of a sow. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that same evening. 

Latest Update: June 22, 2021

The Center's veterinary and rehabilitation staff have continued to monitor Black Bear cub #21-0545 during the past week. On June 17, Wildlife Rehabilitation Supervisor Kelsey reported a noticeable decline in the cub's pacing behavior, and the decision was made to decrease the amount of medication she's receiving to a single prescription administered during regular meal deliveries. During the past week, all of the cubs in LMI began the process of slowly being weaned off of formula.

On April 16, a young Black Bear cub was found in Floyd County, Virginia, attempting to eat a homeowner's sweet feed (goat food). The homeowner waited several hours to see if the sow would return to claim her cub; but after a few hours with no sign of the bear's mother, the bear cub was first taken to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. A biologist with the Department of Wildlife Resources checked the area for den sites but was unable to find any sign of a sow. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that same evening. 

Latest Update: June 14, 2021

During the past week, the veterinary and rehabilitation staff have continued to monitor Black Bear Cub #21-0545's behavior and paw wounds. Rehabilitation intern Ben again noted that the pacing appears to be happening less, likely a result of the continued medication and a high amount of activity and stimulation within in the enclosure that keeps the cub occupied. 

On April 16, a young Black Bear cub was found in Floyd County, Virginia, attempting to eat a homeowner's sweet feed (goat food). The homeowner waited several hours to see if the sow would return to claim her cub; but after a few hours with no sign of the bear's mother, the bear cub was first taken to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. A biologist with the Department of Wildlife Resources checked the area for den sites but was unable to find any sign of a sow. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that same evening. 

Latest Update: June 8, 2021

Throughout the weekend, wildlife rehabilitation intern Ben carefully monitored Black Bear cub #21-0545 and worked through a method of delivering all of the bear's new medication in small servings of tasty formula "mush". On Saturday, Ben noted that the bear seemed calmer and was pacing less, though her paw wounds appeared to be bothering her. On Sunday, the bear also seemed to decrease her pacing behavior and was spotted cuddled with two other cubs on top of one of the climbing stumps in the Large Mammal enclosure. 

On April 16, a young Black Bear cub was found in Floyd County, Virginia, attempting to eat a homeowner's sweet feed (goat food). The homeowner waited several hours to see if the sow would return to claim her cub; but after a few hours with no sign of the bear's mother, the bear cub was first taken to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. A biologist with the Department of Wildlife Resources checked the area for den sites but was unable to find any sign of a sow. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that same evening. 

Latest Update: June 4, 2021

The staff have continued to carefully assess Black Bear cub #21-0545 and her increased amount of pacing. Sadly, the medication that the veterinary team started on June 3 seems to have had no effect. The staff will try one more different type of medication to see if that provides any relief. Since the Bear Pen seemed to make no difference for the young cub, the rehabilitation staff moved the bear back to the Large Mammal enclosure for observation. 

Black Bear cub #21-1427

On May 25, a female Black Bear cub was admitted from Powhatan County after her mother was hit and killed by a car. The cub was able to be captured and transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening. 

Black Bear cub #21-1097

On May 10, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub -- the fourth cub to join the "cubs of 2021"! This small bear was found alone in Botetourt County; rescuers saw the cub on its own for three days, with no sign of the sow. A retired Conservation Police Officer came to retrieve the cub and took it to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke; the cub was given fluids before he was sent to the Wildlife Center the following day. 

Black Bear cub #21-0705

On April 26, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub, bringing the current 2021 cub tally to three. The newest female cub was found in a tree in Grayson County, Virginia. The bear was in the tree for several days; no sow was seen in the area. 

Black Bear Cub #21-0592

On April 18, a young Black Bear cub was found near the side of the road in Wythe County, Virginia. The cub's rescuer left it alone for several hours and checked back later, but the cub was still in the same area with no signs of a sow.

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