Current Patients

Black Bear yearling #21-0153

On February 16, Wildlife Center President Ed Clark responded to a call about a wildlife situation in his own neighborhood -- a small, thin Black Bear yearling was reportedly sleeping on someone's porch, not moving. Ed was able to acquire a variety of safety equipment and gloves and trapped the bear yearling in a crate. 

 

Latest Update: May 10, 2021

After spending just over two months at the Wildlife Center, Black Bear Yearling #21-0153 was released in Rockbridge County on May 4. During the pre-release examination, Dr. Karra noted that the bear's coat was much fuller and healthier than when he was admitted, and skin scrapes done on the same day confirmed that he was free of sarcoptic mange mites. 

 

On February 16, Wildlife Center President Ed Clark responded to a call about a wildlife situation in his own neighborhood -- a small, thin Black Bear yearling was reportedly sleeping on someone's porch, not moving. Ed was able to acquire a variety of safety equipment and gloves and trapped the bear yearling in a crate. 

 

Latest Update: April 30, 2021

Black Bear yearling #21-0153 has made major strides toward a full recovery from the mange which was afflicting him at admission. Dr. Sarah noted that the bear's fur has markedly improved, which is a very positive sign for his overall condition. She also noted that he is bright, alert, responsive, and feisty, even more positive indicators that this bear is almost ready to return to the wild. The rehabilitators have begun to consider #21-0153 for release, which may happen as early as next week. 

On February 16, Wildlife Center President Ed Clark responded to a call about a wildlife situation in his own neighborhood -- a small, thin Black Bear yearling was reportedly sleeping on someone's porch, not moving. Ed was able to acquire a variety of safety equipment and gloves and trapped the bear yearling in a crate. 

 

Latest Update: April 12, 2021

Black Bear Yearling #21-0153 continues to spend time in an isolated bear pen, regaining strength and vitality and recovering from the mange which brought him in originally. One positive change that the veterinarians noted was that this bear was brighter and more active than before, taking a defensive posture and vocalizing during a safely-distanced check-up. This is a good sign, as it shows that the bear is regaining his energy while keeping his natural and necessary fear of humans.

On February 16, Wildlife Center President Ed Clark responded to a call about a wildlife situation in his own neighborhood -- a small, thin Black Bear yearling was reportedly sleeping on someone's porch, not moving. Ed was able to acquire a variety of safety equipment and gloves and trapped the bear yearling in a crate. 

 

Latest Update: March 22, 2021

Black Bear Yearling #21-0153 has now been at the Center for just over a month. On March 16, he was sedated again for another examination by the Center’s veterinarians. Before sedation, the staff noted that the bear was quiet but alert and responsive. Once the bear was sedated, the veterinarians noticed that he was missing a claw on his right forelimb, which was quickly cleaned. Additionally, the bear’s ears contained a small amount of debris.

On February 16, Wildlife Center President Ed Clark responded to a call about a wildlife situation in his own neighborhood -- a small, thin Black Bear yearling was reportedly sleeping on someone's porch, not moving. Ed was able to acquire a variety of safety equipment and gloves and trapped the bear yearling in a crate. 

 

Latest Update: March 3, 2021

Yesterday was Black Bear yearling #21-0153's two-week post-admission checkup. After sedating him, the veterinarians performed a physical exam and noted that the bear's skin condition has improved slightly, though the yearling's skin is still quite crusty. Additionally, the veterinarians collected skin samples to check for mites, and none were found. This is good news, as it signifies that the oral anti-mite medication given to the bear on February 18 has been working. Stool samples were also collected which were parasite-free as well.

Black Bear cubs of 2020

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 6, 2021

On Friday, May 7, the Wildlife Center released the last of the 2020 Black Bears! Orange/Yellow Tags, Yellow/Pink Tags, and Red Tag were darted, anesthetized, examined, weighed, ear-tagged, and loaded for release. Final weights were: 

Orange/Yellow: 44.50 kg 
Yellow/Pink: 31 kg 
Red: 34.90 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 4, 2021

During this past weekend, the rehabilitation team was able to successfully trap and move two Black Bears from the Complex into the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, to prepare the bears for release. Orange/Yellow Tags and Red Tag were successfully moved; Yellow/Pink Tags remained elusive and appeared not to show an overwhelming interest in the baited live trap. The team said the bear was seen several times just lounging in the bear yard, sunning herself on a pile of rocks. Finally, on Tuesday, May 4, she was trapped and moved. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 30, 2021

The veterinarians and rehabilitators have been working hard during the past couple of days to prepare more bears for release. An ideal release scenario involves luring bears into one of the transition areas, spaces where the bears can be safely darted.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 28, 2021

On April 27, four more Black Bears were successfully darted, sedated, and loaded for release! Double Orange, Green/Pink, White/Green, and Double Green Tags were picked up by a DWR biologist for release. 

 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 21, 2021

The rehabilitation staff are working with biologists from the Department of Wildlife Resources to plan the rest of the bear releases for the remaining 2020 bears housed in the Bear Complex. There will be three separate release days next week -- April 27, 28, and 29. Each day, four bears will be sedated, worked up, tagged, and released. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 14, 2021

On April 14, five more Black Bears were successfully darted, sedated, and loaded for release! No Tag, Red/Green Tags, and White/Pink Tags were released together by one DWR biologist; Double Yellow Tags and Double White Tags were released by another biologist.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 13, 2021

On Sunday, April 11, the rehabilitation staff were able to contain the four Black Bear yearlings that are slated for Tuesday's release in the transition yards of the Black Bear Complex. Yellow Tag and Orange Tag were enclosed in one transition yard and slated for release together; Double Pink Tags and White Tag enclosed in the other transition yard. These were the first four bears admitted in 2020! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 8, 2021

Bear releases start next week!

On April 13, several biologists with the Department of Wildlife Resources will come to the Center to pick up six Black Bear yearlings. The bears will be released in groups of twos or threes in several different locations. The following day, on April 14, a DWR biologist will return for two more bears. 

On release days, the bears will all be darted, sedated, examined, ear-tagged (all with green ear tags, one in each ear), weighed, and loaded into a transport trap. The rehabilitation staff plan to attend a couple of the releases next week. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 22, 2021

Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey has been in touch with biologists with the Department of Wildlife Resources to start planning ahead for next month's Black Bear releases!

Later this month, DWR will drop off large culvert traps at the Center so that these can be in place in preparation for next month's release plan. At this point, the first round of bear releases will take place on April 13 and 14, with additional releases taking place during the week of April 19. The 21 bears in the Bear Complex will be split into multiple smaller groups, for releases in various areas of Virginia. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: January 18, 2021

On January 18, the bear cubs of 2020 celebrated a very special event -- their collective birthdays! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: December 29, 2020

Double Orange Tags has been recovering in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure after his surgery on Christmas Eve. Each day, the staff check the bear to ensure his sutures are intact, and to monitor for any redness or swelling. The bear is receiving a course of stool thinners to help ease the passage of his meals as he continues to heal. A fecal examination over the weekend did not reveal any parasites. 

Since the bear was in-hand during darting and during his medical procedure, the veterinary team was able to weigh the bear cub; he weighed in at a hefty 30 kg! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: December 24, 2020

After many hours staking out Double Orange Tags from the Black Bear Complex tower, Dr. Karra was able to dart and sedate the injured cub. The team confirmed that the bear did have a rectal prolapse, which was able to be cleaned and treated. The cub will live in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure during treatment for the next few weeks. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: December 24, 2020

On the morning of December 23, Critter Cam viewers noticed that one of the Black Bears, Double Orange Tags, had an issue with his hind end; the veterinary team closely scrutinized the bear on camera and decided to try to trap and dart the bear for an examination. It appeared as though the bear has a rectal prolapse; this issue is not common though the Center staff did see this issue in 2016 with two bear cubs. Typically, prolapses can occur from prolonged straining [constipation or diarrhea], parasites, or a congenital issue.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: September 9, 2020

On September 8, Black Bear cubs #20-0965 (White/Green Tags) and #20-0967 (Yellow/Pink Tags) were moved to the Black Bear Complex. According to wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey, "Initially, they were put in transition yard #2, but when they were fully awake, the gates were opened and they were immediately integrated with their anxiously-awaiting 17 'siblings'. Darting was successful with no hiccups and the two bears are healthy. White/Green Tags weighed 25.1kg and Yellow/Pink Tags weighed 21.2kg … they are significantly larger than they were a month and a half ago."

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: September 2, 2020

The two Black Bear cubs that have been in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure during the past few weeks are doing well and are ready to move to the Black Bear Complex! The veterinary team plans on moving the two cubs during the week of September 7. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: July 30, 2020

Early on the morning of July 30, the veterinary team moved Black Bear #20-1808 to the Black Bear Complex. The bear was sedated first and tagged with yellow and orange ear tags for identification purposes. The cub recovered well in a transition area and then was allowed full access to the two yards. 

Black Bear cubs Yellow/Pink and Green/White Tags will remain in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure a little longer, just so they can put on additional weight before moving to the yard again. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: July 22, 2020

On the afternoon of July 21, the Center staff discovered that four Black Bear cubs had escaped out of the yards. Two cubs, Yellow Tag and White Tag, were within the perimeter fence. Two other cubs, Yellow/Pink Tags and Green White Tags, had escaped the entire Black Bear Complex and were near the building. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: July 15, 2020

On July 14, the veterinarians and rehabilitators moved six cubs from the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure to the Black Bear Complex. The cubs, along with the cubs already in the Complex, have access to both yards #2 and #3. 

Kelsey reports that there were, "no issues, everyone is perfect and fat and plump and cute and perfect."

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 30, 2020

On the morning of June 30, Drs. Karra and Sarah and rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon were able to move three Black Bear cubs from the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure to the transition area of yard #2 in the Black Bear Complex. Kelsey reports: 

"We moved three bears to transition yard #2 today, and will open up the gate so they can have free access to bear yard #2 later today. As soon as everyone is settled, probably tomorrow, we will open the gate between BY2 and BY3 so all of the bears can mingle.

"Bears moved:

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 17, 2020

The Black Bear cubs of 2020 are all doing well -- the nine cubs currently in the Black Bear Complex are exploring, climbing trees, and generally seem to be enjoying their new space. At this point, all nine cubs are in Bear Yard #3; the Center needs to make a few repairs to a gate in yard #2 before the cubs can have access to that area, since they've proven to the rehabilitation staff that they can slip through an opening in the gate. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 11, 2020

On June 10, rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon weighed many of the Black Bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation  (LMI) enclosure. Several were more than 10 kg -- meaning that they could move to the Black Bear Complex! Cub #20-0106 [Double Pink Tag] -- a cub admitted at the end of February -- weighed in at 10.4 kg. The team re-ear-tagged the bear, since she had lost her tags at one point, and went ahead and moved her to the Bear Complex in yard #3. 

Five other bears were also ready to move -- and will be moved on Thursday, June 11 to yard #3. The cubs include: 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 3, 2020

Last week, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon separated the remaining 14 bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, with the goal of keeping the smallest cubs away from the larger cubs. Based on weights and behavior, the current split includes: 

The littles: (housed in the left side of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure) 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

The Wildlife Center staff are deeply saddened to report that Black Bear cub #20-0833 [Double Orange Tags] died on May 26. The bear appeared to be sleeping on the ground, though when other cubs moved the cub, it became clear that something was not quite right. Rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon quickly went to check on the situation and found Double Orange, deceased. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 25, 2020

Three of the 18 Black Bear cubs have been successfully moved to the Black Bear Complex! On Monday, May 25, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon moved Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag to the transition area of yard #2. Kelsey said that when the bears were introduced to this new space, they briefly sniffed the air, then noticed their grapes (always a favorite treat) in their food pile, and promptly started eating.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

With 17 Black Bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, the rehabilitation staff have their hands full trying to manage and feed this "sloth" of bear cubs! In general, the cubs are doing well and the staff are careful to monitor feeding times to ensure that the smaller cubs are getting their portion of formula. During the past weekend, the staff decided to separate the larger three cubs -- Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag -- into the left side of the Large Mammal enclosure.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 8, 2020

The Black Bear cubs in the Large Mammal enclosure have been doing well in the past week. On Thursday, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon got their intense workout of the week when they weighed all 13 cubs! All of the cubs except two gained weight; Double Green lost a small amount of weight, and Double White was static in weight. These two cubs will be weighed again on Monday. The largest of the bunch, Yellow Tag, weighed in at 11.6 kg! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 28, 2020

All of the cubs at the Center are doing well - all 12 of them are out and about in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. It takes quite a bit of formula to keep 12 bear cubs happy -- but fortunately due to a recent flash fundraiser on the Critter Cam moderated discussion, the rehabilitation staff have been able to buy plenty of specialized bear formula for this growing group. 

The cubs currently eat this much -- twice a day! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 23, 2020

On the night of April 22, Dr. Karra emailed an update on Double Pink Tag -- who had been intermittently quiet and lethargic this week: 

"I know there have been lots of people wanting an update on our Black Bear cub #20-0106, since she was reported to be lethargic and have some GI signs on Sunday night … so here it is! Rehab reported her lethargy to wax and wane the last few days, so we decided to bring her down to the clinic for a full assessment under anesthesia today.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 21, 2020

The eight Black Bear cubs are getting big! The older/larger three (Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag) in particular are getting to be a handful for the rehabilitation staff. Fortunately, a kind supporter sent four pairs of overalls to keep the staff protected from tiny bear paws with very long claws!  

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center's Large Mammal enclosure -- all are eating well and gaining weight quickly! 

#20-0106 (female) No Tag: 3.5 kg
#20-0107 (male) Yellow Tag: 6.9 kg
#20-0108 (female) White Tag: 4.2 kg
#20-0109 (male) Orange Tag: 4.8 kg

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 30, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are settling in well to their new playground in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure! The cubs are being bottle-fed multiple times a day and are also receiving "mush bowls" - bowls of soft veggies, fruits, and dog food covered in a thickened bear formula. The three larger cubs are bottle-fed twice a day, and the youngest cub [No Tag] is bottle-fed three times a day. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 25, 2020

The Black Bear cubs are doing well and gaining weight: 

#20-0106 (female) No Tag: 2.46 kg 
#20-0107 (male) Yellow Tag: 5.05 kg
#20-0108 (female) White Tag: 3.85 kg 
#20-0109 (male) Orange Tag: 4.30 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: May 6, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has remained in the Center's indoor Hold area during the past 11 days, where veterinary staff have been keeping a close watch on the bird's overall condition. On May 5, an secondary set of radiographs were taken, identifying a skull fracture that the veterinarians suspected may have been present on admission. While the precise circumstance of this injury is not known, it's possible that lead toxicity left this fledgling owl more susceptible to physical trauma. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: April 26, 2021

During the past week, Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has made some slow improvements. The little owl no longer requires oxygen therapy and is able to be housed in a crate, where the bird is generally quiet, alert, and reactive. The owl still has a significant head tilt, which has made feeding an enormous challenge. The owl can ingest very small pieces of food and is able to partially hold onto larger pieces of food and tear off small soft bites.

The Great Horned Owlets of 2021

Three Great Horned Owl Hatchlings

This March, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted three Great Horned Owl hatchlings. These owlets, who were admitted as healthy orphans, will spend the spring, summer, and early fall at the Center, growing larger until they are ready to be released into the wild as mature owls. In order to learn the correct Great Horned Owl behaviors needed to survive in the wild, these three owlets are spending time with the Center’s non-releasable surrogate Great Horned Owl parent Papa G’Ho. As a surrogate, Papa is invaluable in helping these owls to prepare for life post-release.

Latest Update: May 4, 2021

The three owlets, accompanied by Papa G’Ho, have now been moved to A2, one of the Center’s largest bird pens. This will allow them to continue to spread their wings, as well as have more space to spread out in general. As time passes, these owls will spend less time in close proximity to one another, a natural sign of behavioral maturation. In the wild, adult Great Horned Owls are solitary, and eventually, these young owls will be moved to their own pens before their release in the fall. 

Three Great Horned Owl Hatchlings

This March, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted three Great Horned Owl hatchlings. These owlets, who were admitted as healthy orphans, will spend the spring, summer, and early fall at the Center, growing larger until they are ready to be released into the wild as mature owls. In order to learn the correct Great Horned Owl behaviors needed to survive in the wild, these three owlets are spending time with the Center’s non-releasable surrogate Great Horned Owl parent Papa G’Ho. As a surrogate, Papa is invaluable in helping these owls to prepare for life post-release.

Latest Update: April 16, 2021

The three little Great Horned Owlets have taken a big step toward their eventual release into the wild! These three little owls, along with their dedicated surrogate Papa G’Ho, have been moved from their small crates indoors into the much larger Flight Pen 2. This not only gives these rapidly growing owlets space to spread out and practice their movement but also puts them even farther from consistent human activity. This will help ensure that they will not become too accustomed to human presence; a behavioral adaptation which could delay or prevent their release.

Black Bear cubs of 2021

In April 2021, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2021 cubs will be released in the spring of 2022. 

Black Bear cub #21-0705

On April 26, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub, bringing the current 2021 cub tally to three. The newest female cub was found in a tree in Grayson County, Virginia. The bear was in the tree for several days; no sow was seen in the area. 

Black Bear Cub #21-0592

On April 18, a young Black Bear cub was found near the side of the road in Wythe County, Virginia. The cub's rescuer left it alone for several hours and checked back later, but the cub was still in the same area with no signs of a sow.

Bald Eagle #21-0214

On the night of March 6, an Augusta County animal control officer found a young Bald Eagle injured on a road in Middle River, VA. He was able to capture the eagle and called the Wildlife Center’s after-hours phone line for assistance. Dr. Sarah, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, met the animal control officer at the Wildlife Center later that night to admit the eagle.

Latest Update: April 19, 2021

On March 26, veterinary staff anesthetized Bald Eagle #21-0214 to surgically remove dead tissue from the wound on its left wing. They were able to remove most of the dead tissue, but part of the wound was still too dry for debridement. Afterwards, they thoroughly flushed the wound with an antiseptic and sutured it closed, then placed the eagle back in the Center's indoor holding area to recover.

On the night of March 6, an Augusta County animal control officer found a young Bald Eagle injured on a road in Middle River, VA. He was able to capture the eagle and called the Wildlife Center’s after-hours phone line for assistance. Dr. Sarah, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, met the animal control officer at the Wildlife Center later that night to admit the eagle.

Latest Update: March 29, 2021

During the past three weeks, veterinary staff have kept Bald Eagle #21-0214 in the Center’s indoor holding area for daily treatment and close observation. An in-house lead test revealed that chelation therapy has successfully removed the lead from the eagle’s system, and radiographs have shown slight improvement of the fracture in the eagle’s right wing.

Black Bear cub #21-0545

On April 16, a young Black Bear cub was found in Floyd County, Virginia, attempting to eat a homeowner's sweet feed (goat food). The homeowner waited several hours to see if the sow would return to claim her cub; but after a few hours with no sign of the bear's mother, the bear cub was first taken to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. A biologist with the Department of Wildlife Resources checked the area for den sites but was unable to find any sign of a sow. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia later that same evening. 

Bald Eagle #21-0345

On March 29, a juvenile Bald Eagle was found on the ground and unable to fly near a landfill in King and Queen County, Virginia. The eagle, a female approximately one to two years in age, was transferred to the Center on March 30 by permitted wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher of Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation. 

Deer Mouse #21-0343

On March 30, the Wildlife Center admitted an adult Deer Mouse that was stuck to a glue trap. On presentation, veterinary staff reported that the mouse was bright and alert, though covered in glue residue that would need to be removed before proceeding with an examination. The staff used gentle soap and water to carefully remove the sticky residue, revealing a wound on the mouse’s front left foot. Vet staff cleaned the wound, provided supportive fluids, and prepared an aquarium enclosure for the mouse to recover in.

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