Current Patients

Black Bear cubs of 2019

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 18, 2019

On the afternoon of June 17, Dr. Karra anesthetized Black Bear cub #19-1176 [Orange Tag] for radiographs and an ultrasound to see if any abdominal masses or obstruction could be seen. The small bear cub was extremely feisty before anesthesia – even though the cub has not been eating the past few days, he is not acting sick.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

Rehabilitators Shannon and Kylee assessed Black Bear cub Orange Tag this morning and found that, once again, he did not eat last night’s food. He did gain a small amount of weight but generally was not interested in today’s food either, which is highly unusual.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

The trio of Black Bear cubs have been entertaining a variety of Critter Cam viewers. They appear to enjoy sleeping in their hammock but often wake up for wild play sessions throughout the day. Orange Tag has been playing and sleeping with his new sisters, though the two larger females are typically first to arrive at the mush bowls once they are delivered. The staff have been carefully monitoring the cubs’ food intake.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 10, 2019

Black Bear cub Orange Tag has been recovering from his forehead laceration; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon noted that the wound looked a little open over the weekend, though it appears as though it was a small area and no additional sutures were needed. Dr. Karra carefully applied a topical ointment to prevent flystrike.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 7, 2019

The two Black Bear Cub sisters [No Tag and White Tag] are currently being fed just once a day; each cub gets a mush bowl, plus a shared “juvenile” bear meal that weighs six pounds! The juvenile meal contains fruits, veggies, seeds, greens, and dog food. The rehabilitation team reports that the two sisters are doing well and remain quite wild and feisty. The cubs are still being treated with a topical antifungal spray, though this treatment is increasingly difficult.

Black Bear cub #19-1176 [Orange Tag]

On May 27, a young Black Bear cub was found in the middle of a road in Franklin County, Virginia. There was no sow in the area, and the bear was picked up and taken to the Southside Virginia Wildlife Center, where he stayed for the night before he was transported the next day to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Latest Update: June 18, 2019

On the afternoon of June 17, Dr. Karra anesthetized Black Bear cub #19-1176 [Orange Tag] for radiographs and an ultrasound to see if any abdominal masses or obstruction could be seen. The small bear cub was extremely feisty before anesthesia – even though the cub has not been eating the past few days, he is not acting sick.

On May 27, a young Black Bear cub was found in the middle of a road in Franklin County, Virginia. There was no sow in the area, and the bear was picked up and taken to the Southside Virginia Wildlife Center, where he stayed for the night before he was transported the next day to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

Rehabilitators Shannon and Kylee assessed Black Bear cub Orange Tag this morning and found that, once again, he did not eat last night’s food. He did gain a small amount of weight but generally was not interested in today’s food either, which is highly unusual.

On May 27, a young Black Bear cub was found in the middle of a road in Franklin County, Virginia. There was no sow in the area, and the bear was picked up and taken to the Southside Virginia Wildlife Center, where he stayed for the night before he was transported the next day to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Latest Update: June 3, 2019

Black Bear cub Orange Tag has been doing well in his Zinger crate on one side of the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. As of May 30, the rehab team felt like they were finally getting on top of the cub’s severe tick infestation; at that point, most ticks were dead or dying. The staff have continued to monitor the cub closely for ticks, but haven’t needed to reapply a topical treatment in the past three days.

Bog Turtle #19-0945

On May 13, an adult male Bog Turtle was found by a road in southwest Virginia. The turtle was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke to be stabilized and was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: June 7, 2019

Bog Turtle #19-0945 is healing well; the veterinary team has been happy to report that the turtle’s bars are intact and stable, and there has been no sign of infection at the site of the shell fractures. Last week, the rehabilitation staff introduced the turtle to a “boggier” enclosure; since the wounds are healing well, the turtle could be moved from a newspaper-based substrate to a more natural damp bark and water substrate.

Bald Eagle #19-0031

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: June 6, 2019

During the month of May, Bald Eagle #19-0031 remained static during daily exercise. The bird continued to have a significant left wing droop during and after flight. In addition, the eagle had become somewhat stubborn and less willing to fly during the sessions. Radiographs performed on May 6 showed no changes to the healed fracture, giving no further indications about what could be causing the chronic wing droop. The staff continues to assess the eagle’s flight for improvement.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 30, 2019

During the past several weeks, Bald Eagle #19-0031 has made marked improvement during exercise. The eagle has more stamina and has improved quality of flight; this is likely because the eagle has been on medication to reduce pain and inflammation. Unfortunately, the eagle has a pronounced wing droop immediately following exercise, which could indicate that there is still discomfort or pain in that wing.

Dr. Peach examined the eagle on April 22 and identified crepitus [a crackling sound] in the eagle’s left elbow joint, however radiographs showed no changes to the joint.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 1, 2019

In the weeks after moving to a larger flight pen, Bald Eagle #19-0031 did not show improvement during daily exercise. During some sessions, the bird would refuse to fly and would instead run along the ground. The rehabilitation team also identified a left-wing droop periodically when the bird was at rest.

The veterinary team performed radiographs on March 25; the healed fracture of the left ulna showed significant callusing and signs of remodeling. These bony changes could be cause for discomfort for the eagle and could contribute to the birds inability and unwillingness to fly.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: March 15, 2019

On March 8, Bald Eagle #19-0031 was moved to a larger flight pen [A1] to begin flight conditioning. During the first few days of daily exercise, the eagle was not flying very high and it had a slight left wing droop while resting between passes; by the end of the week, the bird’s flight quality had improved slightly. If the eagle continues to improve, the rehabilitation staff will increase the number of passes the bird needs to make during exercise. Flight conditioning will take several weeks, and the eagle will need to reach optimal levels before the staff can consider release.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 24, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031 responded well to daily physical therapy sessions during the past two weeks and has been showing an increased range of motion in her left wing after nearly every session.

By February 21, radiographs and a physical examination showed that the eagle’s fractured wing was stable enough for the veterinary team to remove the hardware supporting the fracture.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 7, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031 has made improvements during the three weeks following surgery. Although the bird was initially not eating well, her appetite has improved tremendously; the veterinary staff say she is now “ravenous” and readily eats the whole rat and fish that are offered to her each day. The bird’s fungal and yeast infections (likely caused by post-surgical antibiotics) have now cleared.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 29, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031’s surgical site has been healing well during the past ten days. Following surgery, the veterinary team gavage-fed the eagle to limit the stress put on the patient’s digestive tract; gavage-feeding involves inserting a tube down the bird’s throat and feeding a liquid diet.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 21, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031 has been doing well in the days following her surgery. The bird has been bright and alert, and Dr. Karra notes that the eagle is exceptionally strong.

The veterinary team has been checking the surgical site on the eagle’s wing each day; the left ulna is swollen and bruised but is only showing a minor amount of discharge around the pin sites. The eagle is receiving laser therapy each day before her wing is re-bandaged and wrapped.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 18, 2019

On the afternoon of January 17, Drs. Ernesto and Peach took Bald Eagle #19-0031 to surgery to repair the eagle’s broken left wing and to remove the fish hook. Dr. Ernesto decided to try one more time to endoscopically remove the hook using a grasper attachment. He was able to grasp the hook, but felt a lot of resistance; it was difficult for the team to get a full understanding of what exactly the entire lure looked like. The team decided to open up the eagle’s abdomen and stomach and retrieve the hook that way.

Barn Owlets 2019

On April 22, five Barn Owl hatchlings [#19-0522, #19-0523, #19-0524, #19-0525, and #19-0526] were admitted to the Wildlife Center. The hatchlings were accidently loaded into a semi-truck full of hay in Casa Grande, Arizona and were found while unloading the truck in Crozet, Virginia. Barn Owls are a native species in Virginia, but because these Barn Owls were from out-of-state, the Wildlife Center needed to obtain permission from DGIF to rehabilitate the birds; the Center was given permission to rehabilitate the five young birds, a process which will take several months.

Latest Update: June 6, 2019

The family of five Barn Owlets are growing and eating on their own. The owlets have gained weight  and become more active in their enclosure; on May 23, the rehabilitation team moved the family to a larger flight pen.

Unfortunately, Barn Owlet #19-0524 fractured its left leg in mid-May while still in the smaller outdoor pen. It’s possible the bird injured itself just as it was becoming more mobile and experimenting with flying in the outdoor pen. 

Great Horned Owlet #19-0341

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: June 6, 2019

The three Great Horned Owlets have been doing very well in the outdoor flight pen with Papa G’Ho.

Following a foot and feather check on June 3, wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey determined that the owl family could move to a larger space – one of the Center’s longest and tallest flight pens. In this space, the owlets will be able to practice flying as they get older, and the large birds will have more space to spread out and explore.

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: May 29, 2019

The owl family has been doing well during the past few weeks; the young owlets are increasingly active and have been exploring their flight pen.

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 is doing well and gaining weight -- the owl weighed 1.1 kilograms as of April 29.  On April 26, the rehabilitation began acclimating the owlet outside; each morning, the bird’s crate was moved into a flight pen with the Center’s surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho and the two other owlets currently in his care [owlets #19-0148 and

Great Horned Owlet #19-0223

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: June 6, 2019

The three Great Horned Owlets have been doing very well in the outdoor flight pen with Papa G’Ho.

Following a foot and feather check on June 3, wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey determined that the owl family could move to a larger space – one of the Center’s longest and tallest flight pens. In this space, the owlets will be able to practice flying as they get older, and the large birds will have more space to spread out and explore.

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: May 29, 2019

The owl family has been doing well during the past few weeks; the young owlets are increasingly active and have been exploring their flight pen.

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Since moving to an outdoor enclosure, Great Horned Owlets #19-0148 and #19-0223 have been doing well. The two birds have been in a flight pen with surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho since April 8. In this time, both owlets have gained weight; owlet #19-0148 now weighs 1.44 kg and #19-0223 weighs 1.12 kg.

The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together. Owlet #19-0223 is wearing a blue band and owlet #19-0148 is wearing a yellow band.

Great Horned Owlet #19-0148

On March 13, the Wildlife Center admitted hatchling Great Horned Owl #19-0148 from Chesterfield County. The owl was found by Chesterfield County Animal Control after the young bird fell from the nest and was then taken to a nearby veterinary hospital for initial assessment before being transferred to the Wildlife Center for continued care.

Latest Update: June 6, 2019

The three Great Horned Owlets have been doing very well in the outdoor flight pen with Papa G’Ho.

Following a foot and feather check on June 3, wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey determined that the owl family could move to a larger space – one of the Center’s longest and tallest flight pens. In this space, the owlets will be able to practice flying as they get older, and the large birds will have more space to spread out and explore.

On March 13, the Wildlife Center admitted hatchling Great Horned Owl #19-0148 from Chesterfield County. The owl was found by Chesterfield County Animal Control after the young bird fell from the nest and was then taken to a nearby veterinary hospital for initial assessment before being transferred to the Wildlife Center for continued care.

Latest Update: May 29, 2019

The owl family has been doing well during the past few weeks; the young owlets are increasingly active and have been exploring their flight pen.

On March 13, the Wildlife Center admitted hatchling Great Horned Owl #19-0148 from Chesterfield County. The owl was found by Chesterfield County Animal Control after the young bird fell from the nest and was then taken to a nearby veterinary hospital for initial assessment before being transferred to the Wildlife Center for continued care.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Since moving to an outdoor enclosure, Great Horned Owlets #19-0148 and #19-0223 have been doing well. The two birds have been in a flight pen with surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho since April 8. In this time, both owlets have gained weight; owlet #19-0148 now weighs 1.44 kg and #19-0223 weighs 1.12 kg.

The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together. Owlet #19-0223 is wearing a blue band and owlet #19-0148 is wearing a yellow band.

On March 13, the Wildlife Center admitted hatchling Great Horned Owl #19-0148 from Chesterfield County. The owl was found by Chesterfield County Animal Control after the young bird fell from the nest and was then taken to a nearby veterinary hospital for initial assessment before being transferred to the Wildlife Center for continued care.

Latest Update: April 9, 2019

Great Horned Owlet #19-0148 is eating on its own and gaining weight. The young owlet has gained 390 grams since admission, and now weighs a total of 1.10 kilograms.

Black Bear cub #19-0546 [No Tag]

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 31, 2019

The Black Bear cub “sisters” are growing up! At this week’s weigh-in,  No Tag was 5.2 kg, and White Tag was unable to be picked up for weighing. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey reported that the two are very feisty and have zero interest in humans; she and fellow rehabilitator Shannon decided that since both cubs are more than 5.0 kg and very difficult to handle, they won't be weighed until they are fully weaned and ready to go to the Complex. White Tag has been very protective of her smaller introduced sister.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 22, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Large Mammal enclosure, as many Critter Cam viewers have seen for themselves!

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 15, 2019

On the afternoon of May 14, the two Black Bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and are now on cam! Check out Critter Cam 2 to watch Cub Cam.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cub "sisters" are doing well; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon recorded a couple of video clips during a recent playtime. The cubs are more quiet and wary than past cubs – while the two enjoy playing with one another, they’re always careful to keep a watchful eye on the humans who are present.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Black Bear cubs #19-0492 and #19-0546 [Pink] are both growing quickly; they’re eating “mush bowls” three times a day and are gaining weight. At last weigh-in, #19-0492 weighed 4.20 kg and #19-0546 [Pink] was 3.11 kg.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs -- #19-0492 and #19-0546 – are both doing well and enjoying each other’s company. Both have gained weight since arrival and are eating well; #19-0492 prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a bowl, instead of a bottle and weighs 2.95 kg. The newer bear has been bottle-feeding well though within the past couple days, is transitioning to bowl feeding as well. The cubs are becoming more active, according to the rehab staff.

Black Bear cub #19-0492 [White Tag]

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 31, 2019

The Black Bear cub “sisters” are growing up! At this week’s weigh-in,  No Tag was 5.2 kg, and White Tag was unable to be picked up for weighing. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey reported that the two are very feisty and have zero interest in humans; she and fellow rehabilitator Shannon decided that since both cubs are more than 5.0 kg and very difficult to handle, they won't be weighed until they are fully weaned and ready to go to the Complex. White Tag has been very protective of her smaller introduced sister.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 22, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Large Mammal enclosure, as many Critter Cam viewers have seen for themselves!

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 15, 2019

On the afternoon of May 14, the two Black Bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and are now on cam! Check out Critter Cam 2 to watch Cub Cam.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cub "sisters" are doing well; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon recorded a couple of video clips during a recent playtime. The cubs are more quiet and wary than past cubs – while the two enjoy playing with one another, they’re always careful to keep a watchful eye on the humans who are present.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Black Bear cubs #19-0492 and #19-0546 [Pink] are both growing quickly; they’re eating “mush bowls” three times a day and are gaining weight. At last weigh-in, #19-0492 weighed 4.20 kg and #19-0546 [Pink] was 3.11 kg.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs -- #19-0492 and #19-0546 – are both doing well and enjoying each other’s company. Both have gained weight since arrival and are eating well; #19-0492 prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a bowl, instead of a bottle and weighs 2.95 kg. The newer bear has been bottle-feeding well though within the past couple days, is transitioning to bowl feeding as well. The cubs are becoming more active, according to the rehab staff.

Bald Eagle #19-1068

On May 23, the Wildlife Center admitted a Bald Eagle from Giles County, Virginia. The bird was found down in a landfill by an animal control officer and was taken to Virginia Tech. The ACO and clinicians at Virginia Tech suspected that the bird ingested a toxin at the landfill; they were able to stabilize the bird before sending it to the Center later that afternoon.

Latest Update: May 30, 2019

Many Hospital Cam viewers were able to see the treatment of Bald Eagle #19-1068 on May 28. The team monitored the bird and provided medications, but the eagle was having an increasingly difficult time breathing. The eagle was placed in an oxygen chamber and its respiration returned to normal; however, an hour later, the bird passed away.

Peregrine Falcon #19-0940

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: May 29, 2019

On May 28, Dr. Peach took follow-up radiograph of Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 to check on the bird’s healing keel fracture. She found that the injury was healed and stable, and placed the falcon in a C-pen enclosure. In this area, the bird has room to make short flights and hops, and will gradually be able to be more active.

The falcon has been eating more readily on its own since the bandage was removed last week. 

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: May 22, 2019

Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 has remained stable during the past week. Each day, the veterinary team monitors the bird’s respiratory rate along with its lung sounds. For the most part, the falcon has been breathing normally; occasionally the bird has an increased respiratory rate, but the lung and air sac sounds have been within normal limits, indicating that the ruptured air sac is not causing additional problems for the falcon.

Bald Eagle #19-1560

On Wednesday, June 12, an adult Bald Eagle reportedly "fell from the sky" at a landfill in Campbell County. A conservation police officer was able to respond to the scene and transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center that same night.

Bald Eagle #19-1013

On May 19, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted an immature Bald Eagle from Accomack County. The bird was seen standing on a woodpile for an extended amount of time; rescuers noted that the bird was often hanging his head and appeared to be unable to fly. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator before a registered volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Center.

Black Bear #19-1419

On Friday, June 7, the Wildlife Center admitted a young adult male Black Bear from Rappahannock County. The bear had signs of severe mange and was able to be trapped and transported by a biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.