Current Patients

Black Bear cub #19-0546

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 15, 2019

On the afternoon of May 14, the two Black Bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and are now on cam! Check out Critter Cam 2 to watch Cub Cam.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cub "sisters" are doing well; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon recorded a couple of video clips during a recent playtime. The cubs are more quiet and wary than past cubs – while the two enjoy playing with one another, they’re always careful to keep a watchful eye on the humans who are present.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Black Bear cubs #19-0492 and #19-0546 [Pink] are both growing quickly; they’re eating “mush bowls” three times a day and are gaining weight. At last weigh-in, #19-0492 weighed 4.20 kg and #19-0546 [Pink] was 3.11 kg.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs -- #19-0492 and #19-0546 – are both doing well and enjoying each other’s company. Both have gained weight since arrival and are eating well; #19-0492 prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a bowl, instead of a bottle and weighs 2.95 kg. The newer bear has been bottle-feeding well though within the past couple days, is transitioning to bowl feeding as well. The cubs are becoming more active, according to the rehab staff.

Black Bear cub #19-0492

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 15, 2019

On the afternoon of May 14, the two Black Bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and are now on cam! Check out Critter Cam 2 to watch Cub Cam.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cub "sisters" are doing well; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon recorded a couple of video clips during a recent playtime. The cubs are more quiet and wary than past cubs – while the two enjoy playing with one another, they’re always careful to keep a watchful eye on the humans who are present.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Black Bear cubs #19-0492 and #19-0546 [Pink] are both growing quickly; they’re eating “mush bowls” three times a day and are gaining weight. At last weigh-in, #19-0492 weighed 4.20 kg and #19-0546 [Pink] was 3.11 kg.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs -- #19-0492 and #19-0546 – are both doing well and enjoying each other’s company. Both have gained weight since arrival and are eating well; #19-0492 prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a bowl, instead of a bottle and weighs 2.95 kg. The newer bear has been bottle-feeding well though within the past couple days, is transitioning to bowl feeding as well. The cubs are becoming more active, according to the rehab staff.

Black Bear cub #18-2926 [Pink/Orange Tags]

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: May 14, 2019

On May 11, Dr. Karra and veterinary technician intern Jess took Black Bear #18-2926 to the Augusta Valley Animal Hospital for a tooth extraction. Dr. Patrick, along with several of his co-workers, volunteered their time and clinic resources to perform the surgery. Dr. Patrick found that the tooth had split in half, allowing food and other material to become impacted in the broken tooth; the extraction went well and the bear recovered smoothly.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: May 8, 2019

Black Bear yearling #18-2926 will be scheduled for tooth extraction surgery within the next week; the procedure will be done at Augusta Valley Animal Hospital by Dr. Patrick Robertson. Dr. Patrick has been volunteering at the Wildlife Center once a week and the clinic will be donating their time and services for this procedure.

After surgery, the bear will return to the Center to recover; the team will monitor the bear for at least 10 days post-surgery before release. 

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: April 15, 2019

Black Bear #18-2926 has been doing well in the Center’s Black Bear Pen since the discovery of her tooth root abscess; the rehabilitation team have been feeding the bear a mostly soft diet, and have also gotten creative with a variety of edible “treats” that hide antibiotic pills. The Center is working with a local small-animal veterinary clinic to perform the surgery in late April or early May; this will allow the bear time to receive a full course of antibiotics prior to the procedure.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: April 5, 2019

Bear releases continued today with two more bears returning back to the wild! Today’s release group contained:

Bear #18-2921 [Green/Orange Tags/“jaw bear”]. Final weight: 30.30 kg.
Bear #18-3024 [Orange/Yellow Tags]. Final weight: 24.80 kg.

The bears were examined, ear tagged for release, and weighed.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: March 26, 2019

Bear releases are quickly approaching! All of the bear yearlings at the Wildlife Center are nearing their release time -- even the bears that were admitted within the past few months as undersized sick, injured yearlings. Not only are the bears old enough to be on their own at this point, but spring is also a good release time, due to the abundance of wild foods.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: January 8, 2019

This past weekend, the rehabilitation staff have been keeping a close eye on the four bears in yard #1 of the Black Bear Complex – particularly Pink/Orange Tag. On Saturday, rehabilitator Kelsey reported, “Good news, all. Today, ‘elbow bear’ was our highest climber, up ~50 ft. in a tree.”

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: January 3, 2019

On January 3, Black Bear #18-2926 [Pink/Orange Tags aka “elbow bear”] was darted and anesthetized for a follow-up examination and radiographs. The staff have been carefully observing the bear during the last few weeks; the bear will occasionally hold her old injured limb close to her body, but she does place the leg normally and has been seen climbing logs in the Large Mammal enclosure.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: December 4, 2018

On Friday, November 30, Black Bear cub #18-2926 was anesthetized for radiographs to check on the healing progress of the bear’s fractured elbow. The cub has not been walking properly on his front limb, and based on observation, appeared to have a limited range of motion.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: October 26, 2018

On October 25, Black Bear cub #18-2926 was shifted from a zinger crate to the connecting chute in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Rehabilitation staff report that the cub is eating well and able to move around the limited space, but she does not appear to be placing full weight on her recently-repaired right forelimb.

The cub will remain in the connecting chute of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure for another six to eight weeks while staff continue to monitor the bear’s progress.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: October 22, 2018

Black Bear cub #18-2926 recovered from Friday’s surgery well. The bear is eating well and getting to see and smell her neighbor, bear cub #18-2921.

Cub #18-2926 will need to be cage-rested for eight weeks to fully allow her fracture to heal. At that point, the veterinary team will take radiographs to check on the bear’s elbow. She’s currently on a course of antibiotics to treat an open wound over the fracture.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: October 19, 2018

Dr. Karra and veterinary technician intern Jess took Black Bear cub #18-2926 to Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates on the morning of October 19 for surgery. Dr. Padron was able to successfully stabilize the bear’s fractured elbow; he was pleased with the outcome and the bear recovered well from anesthesia.

The bear will be placed in the small connecting chute between the two halves of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; this will give the bear limited space so that her elbow can heal in the coming weeks.

American Toad #19-0654

On April 30, a private citizen found an American Toad being pecked at by their chickens; it appeared that the toad was already wounded before the chickens found it. The rescuer brought the toad to the Wildlife Center, where it was admitted as patient #19-0654.

The veterinary staff examined the toad, who was quiet but alert and responsive. The toad was unable to use its left hind limb, which also had abrasions. No fractures were identified on physical exam or radiographs. It’s unclear what might have caused the toad’s injuries, but it’s possible it was attacked by another animal.

Latest Update: May 14, 2019

On May 11, the veterinary team noticed wounds on the toad’s hind left toes; there was exposed bone and necrotic tissue on several digits. It’s possible that this late-presenting injury caused the toad’s reluctance to use his left hind leg.

Osprey #19-0430

On April 15, an adult Osprey was rescued by a VGDIF Conservation Police Officer after the bird collided with a tree in Gloucester County and was unable to fly. A nearby permitted wildlife rehabilitation facility assessed and stabilized the Osprey, and the bird was transported to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: May 14, 2019

As of April 30, patient #19-0430 was eating well but still appeared unable to fly. Osprey can be difficult to manage in captivity and require flight pens with large open spaces. Although the Center has large flight pens, their configuration does not necessarily work well for conditioning Osprey patients. 

On May 1, Osprey #19-0430 was transferred to another rehabilitation facility with flight enclosures that meet the Osprey's needs; the facility with continue treatment and condition the bird for release.

Woodchuck #19-0791

On May 7, an adult Woodchuck was found swimming in a containment pond at a sanitation product manufacturer in Harrisonburg. The water contained chemical runoff production and the woodchuck was unable to get out of the pond. A Harrisonburg Animal Control officer responded to the scene and was able to safely extract the woodchuck and brought him to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Sadly, on the morning of May 9, Woodchuck #19-0791 was found deceased in his enclosure. The chemical burns likely impacted the animal internally as well as externally.

Barred Owl #19-0076

On the evening of February 1, a driver observed a Barred Owl hit the windshield of the car in front of her; the driver was able to capture and contain the owl and brought it to the Wildlife Center the next morning, where it was admitted as patient #19-0076.

Latest Update: May 6, 2019

Barred Owl #19-0076 has been exercising well in a flight pen during the past month. On May 6, the owl had a follow-up ocular examination – the third in a series of exams to monitor the stability of the owl’s eye injuries. The exam confirmed that the owl’s eye injury is stable, with no further degeneration, indicating that the owl can continue the rehabilitation plan with the goal of release.

On the evening of February 1, a driver observed a Barred Owl hit the windshield of the car in front of her; the driver was able to capture and contain the owl and brought it to the Wildlife Center the next morning, where it was admitted as patient #19-0076.

Latest Update: April 9, 2019

On April 7, Barred Owl #19-0076 was moved to Flight Pen 1. The following day, the owl had an ophthalmic examination with Dr. Karra, the Center’s veterinary intern; Dr. Karra reported that the owl’s retinal tear had healed, and the bird was cleared for exercise.

On the evening of February 1, a driver observed a Barred Owl hit the windshield of the car in front of her; the driver was able to capture and contain the owl and brought it to the Wildlife Center the next morning, where it was admitted as patient #19-0076.

Latest Update: March 13, 2019

Barred Owls #19-0022 and #19-0076 have been doing well for the past two weeks; while the owls generally don’t appear to perch close to one another, they are tolerating sharing the same space, and both owls are eating well.

Great Horned Owlet #19-0341

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 is doing well and gaining weight -- the owl weighed 1.1 kilograms as of April 29.  On April 26, the rehabilitation began acclimating the owlet outside; each morning, the bird’s crate was moved into a flight pen with the Center’s surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho and the two other owlets currently in his care [owlets #19-0148 and

Great Horned Owlet #19-0223

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Since moving to an outdoor enclosure, Great Horned Owlets #19-0148 and #19-0223 have been doing well. The two birds have been in a flight pen with surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho since April 8. In this time, both owlets have gained weight; owlet #19-0148 now weighs 1.44 kg and #19-0223 weighs 1.12 kg.

The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together. Owlet #19-0223 is wearing a blue band and owlet #19-0148 is wearing a yellow band.

Great Horned Owlet #19-0148

On March 13, the Wildlife Center admitted hatchling Great Horned Owl #19-0148 from Chesterfield County. The owl was found by Chesterfield County Animal Control after the young bird fell from the nest and was then taken to a nearby veterinary hospital for initial assessment before being transferred to the Wildlife Center for continued care.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Since moving to an outdoor enclosure, Great Horned Owlets #19-0148 and #19-0223 have been doing well. The two birds have been in a flight pen with surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho since April 8. In this time, both owlets have gained weight; owlet #19-0148 now weighs 1.44 kg and #19-0223 weighs 1.12 kg.

The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together. Owlet #19-0223 is wearing a blue band and owlet #19-0148 is wearing a yellow band.

On March 13, the Wildlife Center admitted hatchling Great Horned Owl #19-0148 from Chesterfield County. The owl was found by Chesterfield County Animal Control after the young bird fell from the nest and was then taken to a nearby veterinary hospital for initial assessment before being transferred to the Wildlife Center for continued care.

Latest Update: April 9, 2019

Great Horned Owlet #19-0148 is eating on its own and gaining weight. The young owlet has gained 390 grams since admission, and now weighs a total of 1.10 kilograms.

Great Horned Owlet #19-0340

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0340 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0341, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Additional radiographs were taken of Great Horned Owlet #19-0340 on April 26 to see if the bird’s leg was healing appropriately. These radiographs revealed bone and joint issues in the right leg, possibly from that leg being unusable for a period of time; additionally, radiographs show that the leg was healing in a way that would make the right tibiotarsus much shorter than the left. With one leg shorter than the other, the owlet would be unable to hunt or perch as required for a normal, healthy Great Horned Owl, and would also be prone to foot issues.

Bald Eagle #19-0031

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 30, 2019

During the past several weeks, Bald Eagle #19-0031 has made marked improvement during exercise. The eagle has more stamina and has improved quality of flight; this is likely because the eagle has been on medication to reduce pain and inflammation. Unfortunately, the eagle has a pronounced wing droop immediately following exercise, which could indicate that there is still discomfort or pain in that wing.

Dr. Peach examined the eagle on April 22 and identified crepitus [a crackling sound] in the eagle’s left elbow joint, however radiographs showed no changes to the joint.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 1, 2019

In the weeks after moving to a larger flight pen, Bald Eagle #19-0031 did not show improvement during daily exercise. During some sessions, the bird would refuse to fly and would instead run along the ground. The rehabilitation team also identified a left-wing droop periodically when the bird was at rest.

The veterinary team performed radiographs on March 25; the healed fracture of the left ulna showed significant callusing and signs of remodeling. These bony changes could be cause for discomfort for the eagle and could contribute to the birds inability and unwillingness to fly.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: March 15, 2019

On March 8, Bald Eagle #19-0031 was moved to a larger flight pen [A1] to begin flight conditioning. During the first few days of daily exercise, the eagle was not flying very high and it had a slight left wing droop while resting between passes; by the end of the week, the bird’s flight quality had improved slightly. If the eagle continues to improve, the rehabilitation staff will increase the number of passes the bird needs to make during exercise. Flight conditioning will take several weeks, and the eagle will need to reach optimal levels before the staff can consider release.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 24, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031 responded well to daily physical therapy sessions during the past two weeks and has been showing an increased range of motion in her left wing after nearly every session.

By February 21, radiographs and a physical examination showed that the eagle’s fractured wing was stable enough for the veterinary team to remove the hardware supporting the fracture.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 7, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031 has made improvements during the three weeks following surgery. Although the bird was initially not eating well, her appetite has improved tremendously; the veterinary staff say she is now “ravenous” and readily eats the whole rat and fish that are offered to her each day. The bird’s fungal and yeast infections (likely caused by post-surgical antibiotics) have now cleared.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 29, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031’s surgical site has been healing well during the past ten days. Following surgery, the veterinary team gavage-fed the eagle to limit the stress put on the patient’s digestive tract; gavage-feeding involves inserting a tube down the bird’s throat and feeding a liquid diet.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 21, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031 has been doing well in the days following her surgery. The bird has been bright and alert, and Dr. Karra notes that the eagle is exceptionally strong.

The veterinary team has been checking the surgical site on the eagle’s wing each day; the left ulna is swollen and bruised but is only showing a minor amount of discharge around the pin sites. The eagle is receiving laser therapy each day before her wing is re-bandaged and wrapped.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 18, 2019

On the afternoon of January 17, Drs. Ernesto and Peach took Bald Eagle #19-0031 to surgery to repair the eagle’s broken left wing and to remove the fish hook. Dr. Ernesto decided to try one more time to endoscopically remove the hook using a grasper attachment. He was able to grasp the hook, but felt a lot of resistance; it was difficult for the team to get a full understanding of what exactly the entire lure looked like. The team decided to open up the eagle’s abdomen and stomach and retrieve the hook that way.

Black Bear #19-0328

On April 8, DGIF responded to several concerned calls about a Black Bear yearling in a townhouse complex in Albemarle County; although some residents were simply concerned about the bear's general presence in the neighborhood, others were worried that the bear was hurt or sick, because of visible hair loss and a possible limp. A DGIF biologist was able to tranquilize the bear and transport it to the Wildlife Center for assessment and care.

Latest Update: April 24, 2019

Black Bear yearling #19-0328 was anesthetized on April 23 for a physical exam, repeat skin scrapes, and blood collection.  Dr. Peach, the Center’s veterinary research fellow, collected the samples in the Center’s isolation room, then transported the bear to Bear Pen 1.  The skin scrapes revealed seven dead Sarcoptes spp mites, so he’ll still be treated as “contagious”, but won’t be treated with any additional medications at this point. The bear has gained 3.9 kg since admission; while the bear's hair coat is still very poor, the scabs on the bear's skin are coming off. 

On April 8, DGIF responded to several concerned calls about a Black Bear yearling in a townhouse complex in Albemarle County; although some residents were simply concerned about the bear's general presence in the neighborhood, others were worried that the bear was hurt or sick, because of visible hair loss and a possible limp. A DGIF biologist was able to tranquilize the bear and transport it to the Wildlife Center for assessment and care.

Latest Update: April 15, 2019

Black Bear yearling #19-0328 has been doing well during the past week; every day, the vet staff monitor the bear’s respiratory efforts, and it appears as though the bear is breathing normally. The yearling is eating most, if not all, of his food every day.

Beaver #19-0199

On March 22, an adult beaver was found in a parking lot in Goochland County. The beaver was not moving, so someone called an animal control officer, who contained the beaver and took it to the Wellesley Animal Hospital. A veterinarian from Wellesley transported the beaver to the Wildlife Center later that afternoon.

Latest Update: April 23, 2019

During the past two weeks, Beaver #19-0199 has been doing well and making steady improvements. Dr. Karra has been particularly attentive, not just to monitor and oversee the beaver’s care, but because the beaver has been one of her favorite patients! In mid-April, Dr. Karra declared the beaver ready for release; the wounds on the beaver’s back had healed well, and the beaver was acting appropriately.

American Toad #18-3152

On December 26, American Toad #18-3152 was admitted to the Center from Albemarle County. The toad was observed in the road, bleeding and unable to hop; the rescuer initially thought she had been hit by a car.

Latest Update: April 17, 2019

American Toad #18-3152 has been doing well – she still continues to have a voracious appetite! Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey was recently able to get this video of the toad chowing down:

On December 26, American Toad #18-3152 was admitted to the Center from Albemarle County. The toad was observed in the road, bleeding and unable to hop; the rescuer initially thought she had been hit by a car.

Latest Update: March 28, 2019

American Toad #18-3152 has been doing well and has gained weight; at her last weigh-in, she was 98 grams! Some of this weight gain is due to fluid retention. She’s given a daily bath in a hypertonic saline solution to minimize this fluid retention; the hypertonic solution has a higher amount of salt than the toad’s bodily fluids, causing the retained fluids to leave the toad’s body though its porous skin. The veterinary staff examines the toad weekly to assess her body condition and hydration level. Weekly checks will continue into early May, when the toad can be prepared for release.

On December 26, American Toad #18-3152 was admitted to the Center from Albemarle County. The toad was observed in the road, bleeding and unable to hop; the rescuer initially thought she had been hit by a car.

Latest Update: January 21, 2019

American Toad #18-3152 has been doing well at the Center; the toad has gained a whopping 31 grams and now weighs 69 grams! The toad is eating a diet of mealworms and crickets and is typically fed every day; the rehabilitation staff have been adjusting the amount of food to ensure the toad doesn’t gain too much while she continues to overwinter at the Wildlife Center. Each Thursday, the veterinary staff perform a quick health check; they are particularly careful to see if the toad is edematous [retaining too much fluid] – which can result from a fluid imbalance.

Black Bear cubs of 2018

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 16, 2019

Yesterday’s double bear release went well when Double Orange [larger male] and Double Pink [smaller female] were returned to the wild. Katie the DGIF biologist reported to us that both bears were awake (from their anesthetic drug) when she got to the release site – both bears hopped out on their own but were still a little sleepy from the drugs. Katie said, “[Both bears] went about 50 yards away and the big one decided he was still sleepy. So he conks out ... the little one comes back and curls up on him and they both proceed to snooze in the sun! It was hilarious and adorable!”

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 15, 2019

On Friday afternoon, the veterinary team was able to successfully capture and move the two Black Bear yearlings remaining in transition area #3 of the Black Bear Complex. Both bears had evaded their scheduled morning release after they managed to climb over the black protective plastic around one of the trees in the transition area and refused to come down.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 12, 2019

Yesterday’s releases of the seven bears went well; the bears were actually split into three groups and released a few miles apart from one another. Wildlife rehabilitators Brie and Kelsey were able to attend, and got some photos and videos! DGIF outreach people were also in attendance and will be sharing photos and videos at some point.

Double Yellow and Double Green Release: 

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 11, 2019

The bear releases continue this week – with seven more bear yearlings out the door!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 5, 2019

Bear releases continued today with two more bears returning back to the wild! Today’s release group contained:

Bear #18-2921 [Green/Orange Tags/“jaw bear”]. Final weight: 30.30 kg.
Bear #18-3024 [Orange/Yellow Tags]. Final weight: 24.80 kg.

The bears were examined, ear tagged for release, and weighed.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 4, 2019

After two more days of dedicated bear-trapping attempts, Brie was successfully able to lure all of the remaining yearlings into live traps by Wednesday afternoon! The bears were moved to Large Mammal Isolation in preparation for release.

A biologist came this morning to load the two bears; the team weighed and tagged them for release:

Bear #19-0057 [Double Green Tags]. Final weight: 19.9 kg.
Bear #19-0097 [No Tags]. Final weight: 15.5 kg.

Double Green Tags: 

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 1, 2019

On Monday, April 1, the bear releases started – though not as many bears departed today as the staff had planned. Last week, the rehabilitation team attempted to lure the bears out of the trees and into a live trap, so that they could be moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure for easier darting, ear tagging, and loading for release. Unfortunately, none of the bears showed interest – so the team had to attempt to dart them today in yard #1.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: March 26, 2019

Bear releases are quickly approaching! All of the bear yearlings at the Wildlife Center are nearing their release time -- even the bears that were admitted within the past few months as undersized sick, injured yearlings. Not only are the bears old enough to be on their own at this point, but spring is also a good release time, due to the abundance of wild foods.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: March 18, 2019

Spring is approaching – and it’s almost time to say goodbye to the Black Bears of 2018!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: January 17, 2019

On January 17, the bear cubs celebrated their “Parturition Day”– there was a celebration for their collective birthdays!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: January 3, 2019

The 11 Black Bear cubs in yard #3 of the Center’s Black Bear Complex are all doing well. They’ve put on a good bit of weight this past fall; since we’re now in winter, the rehabilitation staff have cut back on the bears' food and are fasting the bears on Sunday. It’s more likely that the bears still have plenty of food to pick from on that particular day of the week, but by not offering fresh bags and buckets of food, the bears will stay at a healthier weight.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: November 19, 2018

On Thursday afternoon, November 15, the Wildlife Center lost power and suffered damage to fences and outbuildings during a severe ice storm. Portions of the Bear Complex were damaged, including a broken water line and several areas of fencing.

In order to make repairs and secure the 11 Black Bear cubs in the complex, the rehabilitation team is planning to shift the cubs to Yard 3 – where adult Black Bear #18-2293 was housed.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 28, 2018

Wildlife rehabilitation intern Shannon reports that all of the cubs are doing well in the Bear Complex – they are exploring, climbing, and utilizing all of their one-acre space. Shannon says that the bears are fairly wary of their next-door neighbor, adult bear #18-1952.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 23, 2018

The Black Bear cubs of 2018 were successfully moved to the Bear Complex on Thursday, August 23!

Dr. Peach sedated the bears so that she could draw blood for the final week of her mange medication study. All of the bears are in excellent shape, and are quite large! The bears were weighed before the move:

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 10, 2018

The 11 Black Bear cubs have been doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; the cubs are eating well and growing quickly! The wildlife rehabilitation team will be happy to move the bears to the Bear Complex in two weeks. At this point, the plan is to allow the cubs to roam in yard #1 and yard #2 in the complex, which will give all 11 cubs access to a one-acre area.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: July 26, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well; they are eating, growing, playing, and enjoying their daily enrichment! The wildlife rehabilitation team have been taking short videos of various enrichment items that are introduced to the cubs – including:

Bamboo “wind chimes”:

 

Creative firehose toys, stuffed with goodies:

 

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: July 6, 2018

The 11 Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The bears were fully weaned from their “mush bowls” this week, and are now eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, seeds, insects, and greens. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie said that none of the bears seemed to miss their mush bowls in the past two days, and the cubs are eating a lot more “adult foods” now, which means the Wildlife Center kitchen is going through a good bit of produce!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 25, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center; they are all still receiving one mush bowl each, plus an ever-expanding “adult” diet of fruits, vegetables, seeds, and insects. All cubs have been weaned from their bottle feedings and soon will be weaned from their bear formula mush bowls entirely – wildlife rehabilitator Brie anticipates discontinuing mush for most of the cubs at the start of July, though the smallest cub, #18-1089 [Double Pink] may continue to receive a mush bowl while she’s housed separately.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 18, 2018

Last week, the cubs began Dr. Peach’s study on a new drug for treating mange in Black Bears. The cubs received the medication on Thursday and had blood draws on Friday; everything went smoothly. Dr. Peach had the opportunity to check each cub thoroughly during the blood draw process; she said all 10 cubs appeared to be in good condition. Some of the cubs still have some hair loss due to ringworm, but overall, they look good and no additional hair loss has developed.  The next blood draw for the study will take place on Thursday, June 21.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 12, 2018

The 10 Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure; they are sampling a variety of different foods that have been introduced to their diet – apples, pomegranates, other fruits, and greens. Each cub is also receiving a mush bowl daily, and Orange, Green, and Red tagged bears are also still bottle-feeding once a day, though as of June 11, Brie noted that they showed less interest.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 4, 2018

The eight black bear cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure are doing well and gaining weight. On Thursday, May 31, the rehabilitation staff weighed the cubs, most for the last time without sedation; they are now too big and strong to be handled and weighed while awake. The staff will continue to weigh Double Green tag until he reaches 5 kg.

Current weights [5/31] are:

Green Tag: 8.1 kgs
Orange Tag: 8.25 kgs
No Tag: 7.6 kgs
Pink Tag: 7 kgs
Red: 5.9 kgs
Yellow Tag: 8.4 kgs
White Tag: 6.6 kgs
Double Green Tags: 3.4 kgs

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 23, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; cub #8 will be joining them soon! Last week, the Center admitted another Black Bear cub, but since he only weighed 2.5 kg at admission, he has some weight to put on first before joining the others in the main enclosures. At today’s weigh-in, he was 2.7 kg – so should be able to come out of his Zinger crate in the next week. 

 

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 10, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well since their move to the Large Mammal enclosure earlier this week. The former Green Tag was unhappy to be separated from her siblings as her ear healed, but fortunately on the evening of May 9, wildlife rehabilitator Brie examined it and thought it was healed enough to be introduced to the others. All seven cubs are housed together in one side of the Large Mammal enclosure; the rehab staff will get the other side ready in the next couple of days so that the cubs have more space to play! Watch them on Critter Cam 3.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 9, 2018

During the past week, the rehabilitation staff have been carefully monitoring the lesions on Pink Tag’s face; No Tag and (future) Red Tag also developed some small patches of hair loss. The staff took several hair samples and the Center’s diagnostic team started a DTM  (dermatophyte test medium) to check for the ringworm fungus. On Monday, May 7, results came back positive for ringworm growth. The technicians were able to “type” the ringworm and concluded that the bears have a highly contagious form of the fungus.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 4, 2018

The seven bear cubs are doing well at the Center; the wildlife rehabilitation team looking forward to getting at least half of these rambunctious cubs into the Large Mammal enclosure area as soon as possible! Within the next week, a few door repairs should be complete, and the cubs that weigh more than 3.0 kgs will be able to move.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 26, 2018

Wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that the bear cubs are enjoying their new space in the sheltered outdoor Metal Cage Complex. Most of the other small enclosures used for housing raptors have been cleared out of the space so that the bear cubs have plenty of room to run around during their play sessions. The rehabilitation team even constructed a fun jungle gym for the cubs, though Brie notes that the cubs are also happy trying to climb the walls and door!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 23, 2018

The five Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center; they continue to eat three times a day and are increasingly energetic and playful with one another. Brie reports that cub #18-0383, the newest cub admitted, has been a little more lethargic than the other cubs; he may just be settling in and adjusting to his new siblings, but the cub will have blood drawn later this week for another analysis.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 17, 2018

Here's a glimpse into the playtime of four growing Black Bear cubs ... 

 

 

Gray Treefrog #19-0004

On January 2, Gray Treefrog #19-0004 was admitted to the Center – an unusual patient for this time of year.

In December, homeowners in Augusta County were moving potted plants indoors and shortly after, they observed a frog hopping around their house. Treefrogs in Virginia enter brumation – a type of hibernation specific to amphibians and reptiles. The frog’s brumation was unintentionally interrupted, likely by being brought into the warm house. Eventually, the homeowners were able to capture the frog and bring it to the Center for assessment and care.  

Latest Update: March 28, 2019

Gray Treefrog #19-0004 has been doing well during the last two months; the veterinary staff performs weekly checks on the frog which include weighing and checking hydration. The frog‘s weight is down slightly from previous weeks [to 11.2 g], but it’s still in good body condition. Weekly checks will continue into early May, when the frog can be prepared for release.

On January 2, Gray Treefrog #19-0004 was admitted to the Center – an unusual patient for this time of year.

In December, homeowners in Augusta County were moving potted plants indoors and shortly after, they observed a frog hopping around their house. Treefrogs in Virginia enter brumation – a type of hibernation specific to amphibians and reptiles. The frog’s brumation was unintentionally interrupted, likely by being brought into the warm house. Eventually, the homeowners were able to capture the frog and bring it to the Center for assessment and care.  

Latest Update: January 21, 2019

Gray Treefrog #19-0004 has been doing well at the Center this month; the frog is readily eating a diet of crickets and mealworms and has gained 3.48 grams since admission. The rehabilitation staff checks on the frog every day to ensure the frog has a clean enclosure and enough food. The veterinary team does a full health check every Thursday, just to ensure the frog remains healthy while it overwinters at the Center.

Peregrine Falcon #19-0940

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Bald Eagle #19-0761

On May 4, a fledgling Bald Eagle fell to the ground in Bland County, Virginia, after the young bird’s nest was destroyed by natural causes the previous night. A Conservation Police Officer rescued and transported the eagle to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center in Roanoke, where it was stabilized before being transferred to the Wildlife Center on May 5 and admitted as patient #19-0761.