Current Patients

Black Bear cubs of 2020

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 3, 2020

Last week, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon separated the remaining 14 bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, with the goal of keeping the smallest cubs away from the larger cubs. Based on weights and behavior, the current split includes: 

The littles: (housed in the left side of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure) 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

The Wildlife Center staff are deeply saddened to report that Black Bear cub #20-0833 [Double Orange Tags] died on May 26. The bear appeared to be sleeping on the ground, though when other cubs moved the cub, it became clear that something was not quite right. Rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon quickly went to check on the situation and found Double Orange, deceased. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 25, 2020

Three of the 18 Black Bear cubs have been successfully moved to the Black Bear Complex! On Monday, May 25, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon moved Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag to the transition area of yard #2. Kelsey said that when the bears were introduced to this new space, they briefly sniffed the air, then noticed their grapes (always a favorite treat) in their food pile, and promptly started eating.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

With 17 Black Bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, the rehabilitation staff have their hands full trying to manage and feed this "sloth" of bear cubs! In general, the cubs are doing well and the staff are careful to monitor feeding times to ensure that the smaller cubs are getting their portion of formula. During the past weekend, the staff decided to separate the larger three cubs -- Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag -- into the left side of the Large Mammal enclosure.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 8, 2020

The Black Bear cubs in the Large Mammal enclosure have been doing well in the past week. On Thursday, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon got their intense workout of the week when they weighed all 13 cubs! All of the cubs except two gained weight; Double Green lost a small amount of weight, and Double White was static in weight. These two cubs will be weighed again on Monday. The largest of the bunch, Yellow Tag, weighed in at 11.6 kg! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 28, 2020

All of the cubs at the Center are doing well - all 12 of them are out and about in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. It takes quite a bit of formula to keep 12 bear cubs happy -- but fortunately due to a recent flash fundraiser on the Critter Cam moderated discussion, the rehabilitation staff have been able to buy plenty of specialized bear formula for this growing group. 

The cubs currently eat this much -- twice a day! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 23, 2020

On the night of April 22, Dr. Karra emailed an update on Double Pink Tag -- who had been intermittently quiet and lethargic this week: 

"I know there have been lots of people wanting an update on our Black Bear cub #20-0106, since she was reported to be lethargic and have some GI signs on Sunday night … so here it is! Rehab reported her lethargy to wax and wane the last few days, so we decided to bring her down to the clinic for a full assessment under anesthesia today.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 21, 2020

The eight Black Bear cubs are getting big! The older/larger three (Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag) in particular are getting to be a handful for the rehabilitation staff. Fortunately, a kind supporter sent four pairs of overalls to keep the staff protected from tiny bear paws with very long claws!  

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center's Large Mammal enclosure -- all are eating well and gaining weight quickly! 

#20-0106 (female) No Tag: 3.5 kg
#20-0107 (male) Yellow Tag: 6.9 kg
#20-0108 (female) White Tag: 4.2 kg
#20-0109 (male) Orange Tag: 4.8 kg

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 30, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are settling in well to their new playground in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure! The cubs are being bottle-fed multiple times a day and are also receiving "mush bowls" - bowls of soft veggies, fruits, and dog food covered in a thickened bear formula. The three larger cubs are bottle-fed twice a day, and the youngest cub [No Tag] is bottle-fed three times a day. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 25, 2020

The Black Bear cubs are doing well and gaining weight: 

#20-0106 (female) No Tag: 2.46 kg 
#20-0107 (male) Yellow Tag: 5.05 kg
#20-0108 (female) White Tag: 3.85 kg 
#20-0109 (male) Orange Tag: 4.30 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Bald Eagle #20-0994

On May 13, an adult Bald Eagle was found down in a field on a dead cow in Pittsylvania County. A DGIF Conservation Police Officer was able to contain the eagle, and took it to nearby Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for initial treatment. The following day, the eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: June 3, 2020

On May 30, Bald Eagle #20-0994 finished its course of oral chelation therapy for the subclinical level of lead toxicity in the bird's system. The following day, the staff re-checked the lead levels and found a reduced level of 0.003 ppm -- just a little above the "low" reading. The eagle has been eating well, and has indicated its preference for fish. 

On May 13, an adult Bald Eagle was found down in a field on a dead cow in Pittsylvania County. A DGIF Conservation Police Officer was able to contain the eagle, and took it to nearby Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for initial treatment. The following day, the eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

After Bald Eagle #20-0994 finished its course of chelation therapy last week, a repeat lead text revealed a "low" blood lead level, and the bird was moved to a small outdoor enclosure. Because lead can also be stored in the bones of an affected animal, the team decided to monitor the eagle in the outdoor space and re-test its lead levels in several days. On May 25, a repeat lead test revealed a level of 0.066 ppm, indicating that while the chelation therapy may have helped remove the lead from the eagle's blood, there was still lead in the bird's system.

Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU]

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

On May 29, Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] was moved to flight pen A1. In this larger space, she'll be able to start a daily exercise program, to get her back in shape and ready for release. 

 

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] has been doing well in a small outdoor enclosure [C-pen] during the past week. The bird is readily eating on her own and has gained weight. In the next few days, the veterinary team anticipates that flight pen A1 will become available; the eagle will then be moved to this 100-foot space for assessment and flight conditioning. 

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] has been doing well at the Center during the past few days. The bird finished his course of medicated eyedrops on May 17, and an additional check of the injured left eye revealed that the vitreal hemorrhage -- the bleeding in the space between the lens and the retina of the eye -- had healed. The eagle hasn't been eating consistently, though many eagles don't eat as well on their own when they are confined to a crate in the Center's holding room. The bird is bright and alert, and was moved to a small outdoor enclosure on May 19. 

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: May 13, 2020

In the day following her admission, Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] was quiet but alert in her crate; Dr. Karra noted a small amount of blood around the bird's glottis [part of the bird's airway], indicating that the bird was still bleeding internally. The veterinary team continued offering the bird anti-inflammatories, medicated eyedrops, and fluids, while keeping the bird in a quiet location. On May 12, the eagle was a little brighter, and her respiratory rate was within normal limits. 

Bald Eaglets #20-1128 and #20-1129

On May 20, two Bald Eaglets were admitted to the Wildlife Center from Stafford County, Virginia. The two male fledglings were found on the ground; the finders called animal control, who picked up the eaglets and brought them to the Wildlife Center. It's unknown if the parents were still in the area. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

All four Bald Eaglets are doing well in the large A3 flight pen. The newest eagles, #20-1128 [lime green bumpers] and #20-1129 [no color of bumpers] fledged from the tower over the weekend, and are exploring their larger area. The other eaglets, #20-0744 [purple bumpers] and #20-0833 [pink bumpers] are making short flights and hanging out on higher perches with adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. The eaglets will start a daily exercise program once they are older and all of their flight feathers have grown in; typically, young eagles are released toward the end of summer. 

Bald Eaglet #20-0803

On May 4, the sibling to Bald Eaglet #20-0744 was admitted from Virginia Beach. The young female bird was on the ground, unable to fly -- and had likely fledged from the nest too soon. 

The young eaglet was bright, alert, feisty, and strong; she was slightly thin and had feather lice, but otherwise had no issues or injuries. Dr. Karra treated the young eaglet for feather lice and placed it in a crate in the Center's Holding room for the night. As soon as the feather lice are gone, the young bird will be reintroduced to her sibling, as well as adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

All four Bald Eaglets are doing well in the large A3 flight pen. The newest eagles, #20-1128 [lime green bumpers] and #20-1129 [no color of bumpers] fledged from the tower over the weekend, and are exploring their larger area. The other eaglets, #20-0744 [purple bumpers] and #20-0833 [pink bumpers] are making short flights and hanging out on higher perches with adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. The eaglets will start a daily exercise program once they are older and all of their flight feathers have grown in; typically, young eagles are released toward the end of summer. 

On May 4, the sibling to Bald Eaglet #20-0744 was admitted from Virginia Beach. The young female bird was on the ground, unable to fly -- and had likely fledged from the nest too soon. 

The young eaglet was bright, alert, feisty, and strong; she was slightly thin and had feather lice, but otherwise had no issues or injuries. Dr. Karra treated the young eaglet for feather lice and placed it in a crate in the Center's Holding room for the night. As soon as the feather lice are gone, the young bird will be reintroduced to her sibling, as well as adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. 

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

The two Bald Eaglets are doing well and growing in the A3 flight enclosure loft; the birds are confined to this space while they grow in their many flight feathers and start becoming more active. Bald Eaglet #20-0744 -- the male -- is marked with purple protective wing bumpers; his sister, #20-0803, has pink protective wing bumpers. Both birds are eating rats and fish and have gained weight since arriving at the Center. 

Bald Eaglet #20-0744

On April 30, a male fledgling Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Virginia Beach. The eaglet came from an active nest on Linkhorn Bay; part of the nest fell out of the tree on April 29, and one of the two young Bald Eaglets fell with it. The bird was not quite ready to start actively flying, and the eaglet was not able to be safely re-nested, so he was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator prior to being transferred to the Center. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

All four Bald Eaglets are doing well in the large A3 flight pen. The newest eagles, #20-1128 [lime green bumpers] and #20-1129 [no color of bumpers] fledged from the tower over the weekend, and are exploring their larger area. The other eaglets, #20-0744 [purple bumpers] and #20-0833 [pink bumpers] are making short flights and hanging out on higher perches with adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. The eaglets will start a daily exercise program once they are older and all of their flight feathers have grown in; typically, young eagles are released toward the end of summer. 

On April 30, a male fledgling Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Virginia Beach. The eaglet came from an active nest on Linkhorn Bay; part of the nest fell out of the tree on April 29, and one of the two young Bald Eaglets fell with it. The bird was not quite ready to start actively flying, and the eaglet was not able to be safely re-nested, so he was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator prior to being transferred to the Center. 

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

The two Bald Eaglets are doing well and growing in the A3 flight enclosure loft; the birds are confined to this space while they grow in their many flight feathers and start becoming more active. Bald Eaglet #20-0744 -- the male -- is marked with purple protective wing bumpers; his sister, #20-0803, has pink protective wing bumpers. Both birds are eating rats and fish and have gained weight since arriving at the Center. 

Bald Eagle #20-0172

On March 9, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Gloucester County. The bird was rescued and taken to the Yorktown Animal Emergency Center. Two days later, on March 11, this bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0172 is doing well in A3, currently serving as the role model for four young Bald Eaglets! The adult eagle is still exercised daily in preparation for release; currently the bird is flying an average of 8-14 passes each day. Overall, her flight is good, though the rehabilitation staff note that she needs more improvement on her stamina prior to release. 

On March 9, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Gloucester County. The bird was rescued and taken to the Yorktown Animal Emergency Center. Two days later, on March 11, this bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: May 7, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0172 is no longer displaying any signs of her previous mouth plaques, and is continuing to regain her strength and stamina in our large flight pen. Rehabilitator Shannon Mazurowski that she is flying easily, and able to gain good height as well as landing successfully on moving perches.

On March 9, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Gloucester County. The bird was rescued and taken to the Yorktown Animal Emergency Center. Two days later, on March 11, this bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 24, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0172 is doing much better! The plaques in her mouth have resolved, and she no longer has parasites.  On April 21, the eagle was moved to A1, one of the Center's largest flight pens. The eagle is now participating in rehabilitative exercises to gain strength and stamina for her eventual release back into the wild. Although our rehabilitators note that she shows signs of fatigue, her overall stamina is improving day-by-day. 

On March 9, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Gloucester County. The bird was rescued and taken to the Yorktown Animal Emergency Center. Two days later, on March 11, this bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 9, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0172 has developed new issues within the past week. She has no longer been eating, and upon examination, the veterinary team noticed that the eagle had developed a white plaque in her mouth, which could be caused by larval cysts. After further testing, unidentified larval nematodes were found in this eagle's feces; the veterinarians prescribed a course of anti-parasite medication. This eagle remains in her outdoor enclosure, and will hopefully respond well to the new treatment.

On March 9, an adult female Bald Eagle was found on the ground in Gloucester County. The bird was rescued and taken to the Yorktown Animal Emergency Center. Two days later, on March 11, this bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: March 25, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0172 is recovering well under the diligent care of the hospital staff. Dr. Karra has noted that the eagle's wounds are healing well, with scabbing on the pectoral puncture wounds. The lead levels in the eagle's blood have dropped from .008 to .0059 parts per million. Dr. Karra also pointed out that the bird remains "BARF" (Bright, Alert, Responsive, and Feisty) which is the ideal behavior and condition for an eagle. 

Woodland Box Turtle Patient #20-0136

On February 29, a private citizen was gardening in Rockingham County and accidentally uncovered a tiny hibernating Woodland Box Turtle. The gardener brought the turtle to the Wildlife Center that same afternoon.

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

On May 21, Woodland Box Turtle #20-0136 was moved from the Center's Reptile Room to the hallway of the Aviary enclosure to acclimate to the outdoors.  This patient continues to eat well and is gaining weight -- this turtle's most recent weigh-in shows that he is 44g!

The turtle is currently living in this outdoor protected space this week, getting exercise and getting used to the outdoors again.  At the end of this week, the turtle will be ready to return to the wild.

On February 29, a private citizen was gardening in Rockingham County and accidentally uncovered a tiny hibernating Woodland Box Turtle. The gardener brought the turtle to the Wildlife Center that same afternoon.

Latest Update: April 30, 2020

Our tiniest Box Turtle patient continues to live in Reptile Room, where it receives hearty meals from the rehabilitation team, and is soaked in a shallow bath twice a week to maintain hydration. 

This patient continues to eat well, and has gained weight -- almost quadrupling in size since admission!  Upon admission, the turtle weighed 8.45 grams and now weighs just under 34 grams.

This turtle's stay at the Center has been otherwise unremarkable, and the staff are just awaiting appropriate spring weather after May 1 to return to the wild.

American Toad #19-3281

American Toad #19-3281 was admitted to the Center on December 7 after a private citizen found the amphibian in a plant she moved inside.  It is likely that this toad was hibernating in the plant, and came out of hibernation after being warmed by inside temperatures. 

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

Toad #19-3281 continued to thrive in the Center's Reptile Room this past winter and early spring, and was released into the wild in its home territory on May 14!

Since this patient's last update, the toad continued to gain weight and the last weight record showed that the toad was 33 grams!  When this patient was admitted in December, it weighed only five grams.

American Toad #19-3281 was admitted to the Center on December 7 after a private citizen found the amphibian in a plant she moved inside.  It is likely that this toad was hibernating in the plant, and came out of hibernation after being warmed by inside temperatures. 

Latest Update: April 27, 2020

American Toad continues to thrive in the Center's Reptile Room.  This patient is now eating three whole crickets once a day, and has been eating well.  Upon intake, this toad was small at just five grams, but now weighs a whopping 28 grams!  This toad's stay at the Center has been otherwise unremarkable, and he is just awaiting appropriate spring weather after May 1 to return to the wild.

American Toad #19-3281 was admitted to the Center on December 7 after a private citizen found the amphibian in a plant she moved inside.  It is likely that this toad was hibernating in the plant, and came out of hibernation after being warmed by inside temperatures. 

Latest Update: January 10, 2020

On December 19, Dr. Karra noted that Toad #19-3281 has been eating well, and ...

Black Bear cub #20-0833

On May 5, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Alleghany County. The history of the bear cub is limited, though the bear did spend some time with humans prior to his arrival at the Center. 

Dr. Karra examined the cub when he arrived, and found that he was bright, alert, and very feisty. The cub weighed 1.9 kg and was in good body condition. No injuries or problems were found on radiographs and blood work; Dr. Karra elected to not ear tag this bear due to his small size. Throughout the procedure, the bear acted appropriately fearful of humans. 

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

The Wildlife Center staff are deeply saddened to report that Black Bear cub #20-0833 [Double Orange Tags] died on May 26. The bear appeared to be sleeping on the ground, though when other cubs moved the cub, it became clear that something was not quite right. Rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon quickly went to check on the situation and found Double Orange, deceased. 

Great Horned Owlet #20-0437

On April 9, a young Great Horned Owlet was found in a homeowner's driveway in Caroline County, Virginia. The homeowners took the owlet to a local veterinary clinic before the young bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center. In the days following its admission, Center staff worked with the homeowners to determine if adult Great Horned Owls were present and active in the area; it's always best to re-nest young raptors when possible since being raised in the wild by wild parents is always the best option. Dr.

Latest Update: May 4, 2020

This past weekend, the rehabilitation staff moved Papa G'Ho and his two young charges to flight pen A2. This larger space will give the owlets plenty of room to start making larger and larger flights as they continue to grow. You can watch them on Critter Cam #2!

Great Horned Owlet #20-0154

 On March 7, 2020, a private citizen found a hatchling Great Horned owlet at the base of a tree below a damaged nest. They reported that the night before, they had endured high winds, likely resulting in the owlet's nest destruction. After admitting the owlet as a patient, the rehabilitation team asked the private citizen to keep an eye on the nest site, in case the parents were to return. Unfortunately, the parent owls were not seen again and the baby could not be returned to the nest site.

Latest Update: May 4, 2020

This past weekend, the rehabilitation staff moved Papa G'Ho and his two young charges to flight pen A2. This larger space will give the owlets plenty of room to start making larger and larger flights as they continue to grow. You can watch them on Critter Cam #2!

 On March 7, 2020, a private citizen found a hatchling Great Horned owlet at the base of a tree below a damaged nest. They reported that the night before, they had endured high winds, likely resulting in the owlet's nest destruction. After admitting the owlet as a patient, the rehabilitation team asked the private citizen to keep an eye on the nest site, in case the parents were to return. Unfortunately, the parent owls were not seen again and the baby could not be returned to the nest site.

Latest Update: April 24, 2020

Great Horned Owlet #20-0154 has been doing well and growing quickly! On April 7, the owlet was moved to Flight Pen 3, along with surrogate Papa G'Ho. This space will give the owlet plenty of room as it grows in its flight feathers and starts making its very first short flights. 

 

Black Bear cubs of 2019

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: April 27, 2020

During the past weekend, the rehabilitation staff were able to successfully trap No Tag, White Tag, and Green Tag in preparation for Monday's release. Pink Tag remained in a tree throughout the weekend. 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: April 22, 2020

Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey spoke with DGIF biologists on Monday afternoon to touch base about final release plans for the four Black Bear yearlings currently living in the Center's Bear Complex. The release is scheduled for Monday, April 27! 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: April 8, 2020

Wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon spoke to DGIF biologists on the afternoon of April 7, to make plans for the release of the four bear yearlings in Bear Complex yard #1. Since "Pink Tag" bear has been seen climbing trees in recent weeks, the rehabilitation staff are no longer concerned about releasing the bear. 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: April 1, 2020

In mid-March, the rehabilitation staff were able to flush Pink Tag into the main part of yard #1, in hopes of better assessing how the yearling was moving and climbing. Given her smaller, stunted stature, the staff wanted to be sure that the bear was able to move and climb normally before they made any release plans. Pink Tag still prefers to avoid the other bears in the yard, but during late March, several Critter Cam viewers spotted her in a tree!

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: March 10, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs of 2019 have been doing well in the Center’s Bear Complex. Regular Critter Cam watchers may have noticed that the bears have been particularly active during the past few weeks, which is a good reminder that spring – the ideal time for these bears to be released back into the wild -- is quickly approaching! In preparation for planning the bears’ eventual release, the Center’s rehabilitation staff are closely observing their behaviors and overall health.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: January 17, 2020

Happy Birthday, bears! Today is the median birth date for Black Bears in Virginia -- so at the Wildlife Center, any bears currently in care receive a birthday celebration. 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: November 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Black Bear Complex at the Center.  As many Critter Cam viewers can attest, the two young females have put on quite a lot of weight in the past two months!

Recently, the bears enjoyed a very special meal of restaurant-grade salmon – a local restaurant received their ordered shipment of fish, but while the salmon was still cold, it wasn’t frozen, which meant they were unable to serve the fish to humans. Instead, they donated the cold salmon to the Center – and the bears enjoyed an extra special meal!

 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 29, 2019

On August 28, the rehabilitation team successfully moved the 2019 Black Bear cubs to the Bear Complex! Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey and wildlife rehab intern Kylee were unable to safely trap the cubs in a zinger crate, choosing instead to dart and anesthetize both of the bears within the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. After Dr. Ernesto conducted a visual examination both of the cubs spent the night in a smaller transition area within the complex, giving them plenty of time to acclimate to their new environment.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 27, 2019

After months of repairs and work on the Bear Complex, the two-acre facility is once again ready to house bears!  Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey and rehabilitation intern Kylee will do a final walk-through and fence test on the morning of August 28. If all checks out, the two cubs will be moved to yard #1 later that day. The rehabilitation staff will try to trap the two cups in a zinger crate [without sedation] for moving. Watch for them when Critter Cam changes to the bear yard!

In the meantime, the cubs have been enjoying a variety of food and enrichment – including live fish!

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 9, 2019

Repairs and preparation of the Black Bear Complex continue, though are not yet complete! The plumbing issues have been fixed, though the construction company will be back one more time to work on a sliding door gate to one of the bear yards, which is difficult to open due to erosion issues. An amazing crew of volunteers has been working on trimming all the tree limbs around the fences; this work is nearly complete.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: July 18, 2019

Despite the high temperatures, the two Black Bear cubs have been quite active in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure lately! Critter Cam viewers have been able to capture the cubs using the ceiling of the enclosure like a set of monkey bars.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: July 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure; last week, the wildlife rehabilitation staff opened up the connecting chute between both sides of the enclosure, to allow the cubs to have access to both sides.

Construction crews have been working on Black Bear Complex repairs during the past month; they have been able to fix a broken pipe and several valves in the water system throughout the two-acre complex. There are still some additional plumbing issues to adjust in the next two weeks.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 24, 2019

Orange Tag continues to be a picky eater; the rehabilitation staff have continued to offer a wide variety of foods, and it appears that the cub typically eats novel food items, then loses interest the next time it is offered. 

On Saturday, Dr. Karra administered additional anti-nausea medication and an appetite stimulant. The bear has the full run of the right side of the Large Mammal enclosure but is still separate from the other two cubs so that he has full access to his food and so the rehabilitation staff can closely monitor all food intake.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 20, 2019

Orange Tag ate about 60% of his meal overnight; rather than eating the A/D again, he mostly ate baby food and canned dog food. The cub only lost 200 grams, and while the rehabilitation staff would prefer that the cub gain, 200 grams is a small loss. The rehabilitation team offered a variety of foods once again, this time adding baby food on top of the A/D diet. 

If the cub's appetite decreases again, the staff will order more anti-nausea medications, along with an appetite stimulant. 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 19, 2019

Wildlife rehabilitation intern Kylee reported that Orange Tag ate his second meal of A/D during the day on June 18. For the evening feeding, she offered more A/D, plus a mush bowl. On the morning of June 19, wildlife rehabilitator Shannon found that the cub had eaten about half of the A/D, but showed no interest in the mush bowl. The cub is feisty and bluff charging the rehabilitation staff as normal.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 18, 2019

On the afternoon of June 17, Dr. Karra anesthetized Black Bear cub #19-1176 [Orange Tag] for radiographs and an ultrasound to see if any abdominal masses or obstruction could be seen. The small bear cub was extremely feisty before anesthesia – even though the cub has not been eating the past few days, he is not acting sick.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

Rehabilitators Shannon and Kylee assessed Black Bear cub Orange Tag this morning and found that, once again, he did not eat last night’s food. He did gain a small amount of weight but generally was not interested in today’s food either, which is highly unusual.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

The trio of Black Bear cubs have been entertaining a variety of Critter Cam viewers. They appear to enjoy sleeping in their hammock but often wake up for wild play sessions throughout the day. Orange Tag has been playing and sleeping with his new sisters, though the two larger females are typically first to arrive at the mush bowls once they are delivered. The staff have been carefully monitoring the cubs’ food intake.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 10, 2019

Black Bear cub Orange Tag has been recovering from his forehead laceration; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon noted that the wound looked a little open over the weekend, though it appears as though it was a small area and no additional sutures were needed. Dr. Karra carefully applied a topical ointment to prevent flystrike.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 7, 2019

The two Black Bear Cub sisters [No Tag and White Tag] are currently being fed just once a day; each cub gets a mush bowl, plus a shared “juvenile” bear meal that weighs six pounds! The juvenile meal contains fruits, veggies, seeds, greens, and dog food. The rehabilitation team reports that the two sisters are doing well and remain quite wild and feisty. The cubs are still being treated with a topical antifungal spray, though this treatment is increasingly difficult.

Black Bear cubs #20-0107, 20-0108, and 20-0109

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Black Bear cubs #20-0105 & #20-0106

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Black Bear cub #20-1118

On May 20, a male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center from Warren County, Virginia. The cub had been seen in the area for about a week with no sign of a mother bear; the cub was trapped and DGIF transported the young bear to the Wildlife Center. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0965, 0966, and 0967

On May 13, three more Black Bear cubs arrived at the Wildlife Center of Virginia! The cubs were found in Luray on May 12; the finder heard the cubs crying in a field behind a house. The bears were gathered and placed in a box for the night outside to see if the mother bear would come back for them, but sadly there was no sign of the sow by the next morning. DGIF instructed the finder to bring the cubs to the Wildlife Center. 

Black Bear cub #20-0698

On April 28, another Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center -- taking the current cub count up to 13! The female cub was found alone and crying in Dickenson County on April 24; a private citizen took the cub home and fed it evaporated milk throughout the weekend. On Monday, April 27, the cub was taken first to a local veterinary clinic and then transferred to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0646 and #20-0647

On the morning of April 25, the Wildlife Center admitted two more Black Bear cubs -- bringing the current cub tally to 12. These two cubs were found in Bath County; a private citizen saw the two young bears without a sow on April 19. On April 24, he saw them again and called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who responded to the call. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0589 and #20-0590

On April 21, two Black Bear cubs were admitted to the Wildlife Center from Prince Edward County. The two cubs were seen in a cow pasture on the morning of April 20; there was no sign of a sow for about 16 hours. When the DGIF biologists responded to the scene, one cub was in a tree, and the other was curled up in a ditch by the road. There were reports of an adult Black Bear sow in the area hit by a vehicle last week, though biologists were never able to locate the bear; they suspect that the incident causes these cubs to be orphaned. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0468, #20-0469, and #20-0470

At about 9:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 11, a Black Bear sow was hit and killed by a truck on I-64 in Rockbridge County. There were three cubs with her,  and the trucker called the state police. The cubs climbed about 50-60 feet up a nearby tree. 

Black Bear cub #20-0384

On Tuesday, April 7, another Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The tiny female cub was found alone in Buchanan County on April 6 and was taken to a local veterinary clinic before she spent the night at the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke.