Current Patients

Bald Eagle #22-3464

On October 27, an adult Bald Eagle was found injured on the side of the road in Chesapeake, Virginia. The eagle was likely injured due to a vehicle collision. Chesapeake Animal Services captured the bird and brought it to permitted wildlife rehabilitator Lisa Barlow for initial treatment before transporting it to the Wildlife Center for further care.

Canada Goose #22-3163

On September 13, a private citizen in Mechanicsville, Virginia noticed a Canada Goose thrashing around in the lake in their backyard. A closer inspection revealed that the goose was hooked by a fishing lure on its bill and its left leg, causing its head to become caught underwater. The goose would likely have drowned had the citizen not acted quickly and freed the goose from the fishing gear. After freeing the goose, the rescuer transported the exhausted bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 29, 2022

During the past month, Canada Goose  #22-3163 has continued to do well in Aviary 1. While the goose's bumblefoot and carpal wounds have been challenging to manage, the vet team's treatment plan, including a combination of antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and bandages, has helped the wounds heal well. Staff have closely monitored the goose on cam and note that the bird has been able to walk and swim in its enclosure without difficulty. 

Black Bear cubs of 2022

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: November 5, 2022

During the past two months, the Black Bear cubs have become much more active and have foraged for food more frequently throughout the day. The reason for this increase in activity and appetite is "hyperphagia", a process that Black Bears go through in fall. During hyperphagia, Black Bears will excessively eat to build up the fat reserves they need to make it through winter torpor (similar to hibernation); in the wild, a Black Bear can gain between two to four pounds a day during fall months.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: August 30, 2022

During the past week, the rehab staff determined that Blue Tag, Double White Tags, and the untagged female cub were within the target weight range and body condition to be transitioned from the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure into the Black Bear Complex. Daily checks of the interior and exterior Bear Complex perimeter fences haven’t revealed any further issues, and Wildlife Rehabilitation Supervisor Kelsey reports that both hotwires are consistently reading adequate voltage.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: August 22, 2022

All five Black Bear cubs have been doing well at the Center for the past couple of weeks. The cubs are still split into two small groups based on size: Yellow Tags and Orange Tags are currently in yard #2 of the Black Bear Complex, while Blue Tag, Double White Tags, and the untagged female cub are in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: August 11, 2022

On August 9, the veterinary team was able to sedate and anesthetize Black Bear #22-1448 [Double Orange tags], who has been housed in the Center's Bear Pens this summer, so that he could be moved to the Black Bear Complex. Dr. Karra reports that the bear is in good condition, and weighed in at 17 kg.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: August 2, 2022

After Double Blue tags escaped into the perimeter of the Black Bear Complex on July 23, the staff carefully checked the complex to determine how the cub had gotten out. The staff realized that the hotwire that runs around the interior fences of each yard was not functioning properly; Dr. Karra was able to find the issue and repair it.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: July 23, 2022

On the morning of July 23, the rehabilitation team discovered that Black Bear cub #22-0685 (Double Blue tags) managed to escape the bear yard into the complex perimeter. Rehabilitation staff were able to safely capture the cub and placed him in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure with cub #22-1087 [female] and Double White tags. 

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: July 21, 2022

On July 21, the veterinary team started moving the cubs of 2022 to the Black Bear Complex! After a week of cleaning up the bear yard and making final checks and fixes, the staff were ready to move the largest of the cubs to yard #2 in the complex. One finishing touch that was added to the yard was a very large firehose hammock that was created by Center volunteer J.J. and some friends – the hammock should be plenty large enough to hold all five cubs if they so choose!

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: July 5, 2022

During the past few days, Black Bear cub #22-1376 [Double White Tags] has been doing well in the connecting chute of the Large Mammal enclosure. The cub is able to walk and climb well with his healed leg. While the team initially wanted to cage rest him for a few more days, the staff decided to shuffle the cubs around to accommodate the increased energy levels of the growing cubs.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: June 17, 2022

The three Black Bear cubs currently housed in the right side of the Large Mammal enclosure have been doing well during the past week. The cubs are quite active and Critter Cam viewers have been able to watch these three cubs play and explore together. 

As of June 13, weights were: 

Black Bear cub #22-0462: 11.2 kg
Black Bear cub #22-0685: 6.0 kg
Black Bear cub #22-1087: 3.62 kg

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: June 8, 2022

During this past weekend, the rehabilitation staff decided to move Black Bear #22-0462 to the right side of the LMI, to be with the two smaller cubs in care. Cub #0462 had been housed with cub #22-1448 [Double Orange Tags], though the newcomer had continued to show no desire to interact with the cub, but did exhibit some pacing behavior. The three cubs in Large Mammal started interacting and playing at once.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2022

During the past week, the cubs in the Center’s LMI enclosure have continued to gain weight. As of June 2, weights were:

Black Bear cub #22-0462: 9.0 kg
Black Bear cub #22-0685: 5.25 kg
Black Bear cub #22-1087: 3.0 kg

The smallest cub, female #22-1087, is now large enough to live in one of the main Large Mammal Isolation enclosures.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: May 26, 2022

The three Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well – all three are eating and gaining weight. Black Bear cub #22-0685 [shaved shoulder], the second male cub admitted this year, is splitting his time between his two playmates – at night, he is placed into the chute with cub #22-1087 (the small female), and during the day, he romps and plays with the largest cub #22-0462.

In April 2022, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until spring 2023, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. 

Latest Update: May 17, 2022

The first two Black Bear cubs of 2022 are doing well -- both are eating and gaining weight! With consistently warmer temperatures, both bears were moved to the Center's Large Mammal enclosure on May 11. They were transported in the Center's brand-new Polaris!

Black Bear cub #22-1376

On Sunday, May 29, an injured male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Nelson County after it has been spotted in the road for two days.  The Center's veterinary team examined the small cub and found that he had a humeral fracture of his right front leg. Blood work revealed that the bear was also slightly anemic, likely due to blood loss due to the traumatic injury. No other injuries were found.

Latest Update: June 30, 2022

On June 30, the veterinary team sedated Black Bear cub #22-1376 for another set of radiographs to evaluate the cub’s healing leg fracture. Dr. Karra noted that the incision site was healing very well, and the bear’s range of motion was excellent. Radiographs showed a completely healed fracture, with no movement or abnormalities associated with the metal plate. Dr. Karra sent the images to Dr. Stiffler, who was also pleased with the status of the bear’s injury. While the bear was under anesthesia, the staff placed a white ear tag in each ear.

On Sunday, May 29, an injured male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Nelson County after it has been spotted in the road for two days.  The Center's veterinary team examined the small cub and found that he had a humeral fracture of his right front leg. Blood work revealed that the bear was also slightly anemic, likely due to blood loss due to the traumatic injury. No other injuries were found.

Latest Update: June 17, 2022

On June 16, the veterinary team sedated Black Bear cub #22-1376 to recheck the bear’s humeral fracture.  The bear has reportedly been using his leg well in his confined space. Dr. Karra reported that, on examination, the cub's leg felt very stable and his range of motion was excellent. Dr. Karra cleaned the incision site well and applied a liquid bandage spray to offer some additional protection.

On Sunday, May 29, an injured male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Nelson County after it has been spotted in the road for two days.  The Center's veterinary team examined the small cub and found that he had a humeral fracture of his right front leg. Blood work revealed that the bear was also slightly anemic, likely due to blood loss due to the traumatic injury. No other injuries were found.

Latest Update: June 9, 2022

In the week following his surgery, Black Bear cub #22-1376 has been recovering well in his Zinger crate, which is located in the vestibule of the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure. The veterinary team is keeping the bear mildly sedated during the initial period of his most strict cage rest. The cub has been eating well and gaining weight.

On Sunday, May 29, an injured male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Nelson County after it has been spotted in the road for two days.  The Center's veterinary team examined the small cub and found that he had a humeral fracture of his right front leg. Blood work revealed that the bear was also slightly anemic, likely due to blood loss due to the traumatic injury. No other injuries were found.

Latest Update: June 2, 2022

Dr. Karra reports that the surgery for Black Bear cub #22-1376 went well! Dr. Karra and LVT Jess Ransier left the Center at about 7:30 am on the morning of June 2 with the bear. The staff at VVS had Dr. Karra and Jess present the bear’s case at the hospital’s daily rounds prior to surgery. Board-certified surgeon Dr. Kevin Stiffler and the VVS team were able to successfully repair the bear’s fracture during the surgery, which lasted a couple of hours. The bear recovered well before his trip back to the Wildlife Center.

Black Bear cub #22-1448 [Double Orange Tags]

On the night of May 31, a Black Bear sow was hit and killed by a vehicle in Loudoun County. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resource biologists responded to the scene and found a bear cub that had climbed a nearby tree.  Biologists Jordan and Carl worked well into the night to extract the orphaned cub from a tree; they were finally successful the following morning at 4:00 am! Carl transported the cub to the Wildlife Center just hours later as staff arrived at work.

Black Bear cub #22-1087

On the afternoon of Sunday, May 15, a small Black Bear cub was rescued from a tree in Salem, Virginia. The bear had been seen in the same tree for 36 hours with no sign of a sow. The cub was first taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for overnight care, then transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning. 

Black Bear cub #22-0685

On April 26, property owners in Greene County found a young Black Bear cub in their barn, under a tractor, just hours after a severe storm rolled through central Virginia. There were no signs of the mother bear that evening or the next morning, and after a discussion with the Department of Wildlife Resources, the rescuers brought the cub to the Wildlife Center on April 27. 

Latest Update: May 6, 2022

During the past week, Black Bear cub #22-0685’s condition has improved. Rehabilitation staff report that the cub was happy to eat his meal on the morning of May 1 after being transitioned back to a Zinger crate near Black Bear cub #22-0462. The cub is still underweight and in thin body condition, but his appetite has continued to grow throughout the week, resulting in a slight increase in weight. On May 5, the cub weighed in at 1.70 kg -- 30 g heavier than his intake weight of 1.40 kg.

Black Bear cub #22-0462

On April 11, a private citizen in Augusta County saw a young Black Bear cub in a tree near a residential area. Following a period of observation, no adult bears were seen in the area. The concerned citizen captured the cub on their own, fed the cub an unknown amount of cow’s milk, and began driving with the bear toward the Wildlife Center for assistance. While en route, the rescuer contacted the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for further guidance.

Latest Update: May 3, 2022

During the past eight days, Black Bear cub #22-0462 has continued to receive care at the Wildlife Center of Virginia and is doing well. In between scheduled feedings, the cub has been spending time in a large zinger crate in a small quiet space. 

On April 11, a private citizen in Augusta County saw a young Black Bear cub in a tree near a residential area. Following a period of observation, no adult bears were seen in the area. The concerned citizen captured the cub on their own, fed the cub an unknown amount of cow’s milk, and began driving with the bear toward the Wildlife Center for assistance. While en route, the rescuer contacted the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for further guidance.

Latest Update: April 25, 2022

It’s been two weeks since Black Bear cub #22-0462’s admission; during that time, Wildlife Center staff have been in close contact with biologists at the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources to discuss options for finding another bear friend for this young cub. Raising young mammals together at a vulnerable stage in their development is an important part of rehabilitation; whether natural siblings or introduced ones, infant and young juvenile mammals received comfort and learn preliminary social skills when raised together.

On April 11, a private citizen in Augusta County saw a young Black Bear cub in a tree near a residential area. Following a period of observation, no adult bears were seen in the area. The concerned citizen captured the cub on their own, fed the cub an unknown amount of cow’s milk, and began driving with the bear toward the Wildlife Center for assistance. While en route, the rescuer contacted the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for further guidance.

Latest Update: April 22, 2022

Black Bear cub #22-0462 has been settling in well during the past week. Wildlife rehabilitation supervisor Kelsey reports that the cub wants nothing to do with his bottle of formula, but is readily eating his thickened formula from a mush bowl three times a day. As of April 21, the cub weighs 3.08 kg.

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: November 30, 2021

In August, Dr. Karra made the official decision that Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 was non-releasable due to permanent neurologic deficits. Since the outreach department has been open to accepting a new education screech-owl ambassador, Vice President for Outreach & Education Amanda decided to start an assessment to see if this owl could be a good fit.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: July 22, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been doing well in his enclosure, along with several other young screech-owls. The bird no longer has any discernable head tilt, can successfully feed himself, and has been able to move to different perches within the enclosure. Within the past two weeks, the staff began a regular exercise program for all young owlets, in preparation for releasing them sometime during August. Unfortunately, the staff quickly discovered that, in a larger flight space, the Eastern Screech-Owl is having difficulty flying and navigating a larger space.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: June 22, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been doing well in one of the Center's B-pens, along with three other owlets. The owlet's severe head tilt has improved in the past two weeks, though a slight head tilt remains. The owlet has not yet started a daily exercise program since its flight feathers are still growing, but the rehabilitation staff have observed the young bird making short flights around the small flight enclosure.

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: June 2, 2021

During the past two weeks, the veterinary team has carefully monitored Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 for signs of improvement. The young bird still has a significant head tilt, though the team feels that there was a slight improvement after multiple weeks of wearing a small neck brace. Another lead text on May 26 revealed a "low" level, indicating that perhaps the lead has finally been removed from the young bird's system. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: May 19, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has been continuing to recover from lead toxicity and associated neurologic issues. The young owl has had a number of lead tests to re-check blood lead levels; while some tests have returned at "low" levels, subsequent tests revealed an elevated level of lead again. Since lead accumulates in the bones of affected birds, treating lead in some individuals can be a prolonged process. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: May 6, 2021

Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has remained in the Center's indoor Hold area during the past 11 days, where veterinary staff have been keeping a close watch on the bird's overall condition. On May 5, an secondary set of radiographs were taken, identifying a skull fracture that the veterinarians suspected may have been present on admission. While the precise circumstance of this injury is not known, it's possible that lead toxicity left this fledgling owl more susceptible to physical trauma. 

On April 12, a visitor at Booker T. Washington Park in Charlottesville found a young fledgling Eastern Screech-Owl on the ground.

Latest Update: April 26, 2021

During the past week, Eastern Screech-Owl #21-0509 has made some slow improvements. The little owl no longer requires oxygen therapy and is able to be housed in a crate, where the bird is generally quiet, alert, and reactive. The owl still has a significant head tilt, which has made feeding an enormous challenge. The owl can ingest very small pieces of food and is able to partially hold onto larger pieces of food and tear off small soft bites.

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