Current Patients

Bald Eaglet #20-0803

On May 4, the sibling to Bald Eaglet #20-0744 was admitted from Virginia Beach. The young female bird was on the ground, unable to fly -- and had likely fledged from the nest too soon. 

The young eaglet was bright, alert, feisty, and strong; she was slightly thin and had feather lice, but otherwise had no issues or injuries. Dr. Karra treated the young eaglet for feather lice and placed it in a crate in the Center's Holding room for the night. As soon as the feather lice are gone, the young bird will be reintroduced to her sibling, as well as adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. 

Latest Update: July 8, 2020

This past week, two of the young Bald Eaglets of 2020 -- #20-0744 [purple wing bumpers] and #20-0803 [pink wing bumpers] were moved back to flight pen A3, after some repairs were made to the lofted nest area. The two birds started a daily exercise procedure with the rehabilitation staff; currently, the birds are flying back and forth just a few times to start to slowly build their stamina. 

On May 4, the sibling to Bald Eaglet #20-0744 was admitted from Virginia Beach. The young female bird was on the ground, unable to fly -- and had likely fledged from the nest too soon. 

The young eaglet was bright, alert, feisty, and strong; she was slightly thin and had feather lice, but otherwise had no issues or injuries. Dr. Karra treated the young eaglet for feather lice and placed it in a crate in the Center's Holding room for the night. As soon as the feather lice are gone, the young bird will be reintroduced to her sibling, as well as adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. 

Latest Update: June 25, 2020

The eaglets in the A3 flight pen have been doing well during the past months; the birds have become more and more active as they've grown. This weekend, the four eaglets will be moved to flight pen A2 so that some repair work can be done on the eagle loft area next week; once the repairs are done, two eagles will be moved back to A3, and two will remain in A2. This will allow the growing birds to utilize more space during regular daily exercise in preparation for their late summer release. 

On May 4, the sibling to Bald Eaglet #20-0744 was admitted from Virginia Beach. The young female bird was on the ground, unable to fly -- and had likely fledged from the nest too soon. 

The young eaglet was bright, alert, feisty, and strong; she was slightly thin and had feather lice, but otherwise had no issues or injuries. Dr. Karra treated the young eaglet for feather lice and placed it in a crate in the Center's Holding room for the night. As soon as the feather lice are gone, the young bird will be reintroduced to her sibling, as well as adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

All four Bald Eaglets are doing well in the large A3 flight pen. The newest eagles, #20-1128 [lime green bumpers] and #20-1129 [no color of bumpers] fledged from the tower over the weekend, and are exploring their larger area. The other eaglets, #20-0744 [purple bumpers] and #20-0833 [pink bumpers] are making short flights and hanging out on higher perches with adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. The eaglets will start a daily exercise program once they are older and all of their flight feathers have grown in; typically, young eagles are released toward the end of summer. 

On May 4, the sibling to Bald Eaglet #20-0744 was admitted from Virginia Beach. The young female bird was on the ground, unable to fly -- and had likely fledged from the nest too soon. 

The young eaglet was bright, alert, feisty, and strong; she was slightly thin and had feather lice, but otherwise had no issues or injuries. Dr. Karra treated the young eaglet for feather lice and placed it in a crate in the Center's Holding room for the night. As soon as the feather lice are gone, the young bird will be reintroduced to her sibling, as well as adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. 

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

The two Bald Eaglets are doing well and growing in the A3 flight enclosure loft; the birds are confined to this space while they grow in their many flight feathers and start becoming more active. Bald Eaglet #20-0744 -- the male -- is marked with purple protective wing bumpers; his sister, #20-0803, has pink protective wing bumpers. Both birds are eating rats and fish and have gained weight since arriving at the Center. 

Bald Eaglet #20-0744

On April 30, a male fledgling Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Virginia Beach. The eaglet came from an active nest on Linkhorn Bay; part of the nest fell out of the tree on April 29, and one of the two young Bald Eaglets fell with it. The bird was not quite ready to start actively flying, and the eaglet was not able to be safely re-nested, so he was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator prior to being transferred to the Center. 

Latest Update: July 8, 2020

This past week, two of the young Bald Eaglets of 2020 -- #20-0744 [purple wing bumpers] and #20-0803 [pink wing bumpers] were moved back to flight pen A3, after some repairs were made to the lofted nest area. The two birds started a daily exercise procedure with the rehabilitation staff; currently, the birds are flying back and forth just a few times to start to slowly build their stamina. 

On April 30, a male fledgling Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Virginia Beach. The eaglet came from an active nest on Linkhorn Bay; part of the nest fell out of the tree on April 29, and one of the two young Bald Eaglets fell with it. The bird was not quite ready to start actively flying, and the eaglet was not able to be safely re-nested, so he was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator prior to being transferred to the Center. 

Latest Update: June 25, 2020

The eaglets in the A3 flight pen have been doing well during the past months; the birds have become more and more active as they've grown. This weekend, the four eaglets will be moved to flight pen A2 so that some repair work can be done on the eagle loft area next week; once the repairs are done, two eagles will be moved back to A3, and two will remain in A2. This will allow the growing birds to utilize more space during regular daily exercise in preparation for their late summer release. 

On April 30, a male fledgling Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Virginia Beach. The eaglet came from an active nest on Linkhorn Bay; part of the nest fell out of the tree on April 29, and one of the two young Bald Eaglets fell with it. The bird was not quite ready to start actively flying, and the eaglet was not able to be safely re-nested, so he was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator prior to being transferred to the Center. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

All four Bald Eaglets are doing well in the large A3 flight pen. The newest eagles, #20-1128 [lime green bumpers] and #20-1129 [no color of bumpers] fledged from the tower over the weekend, and are exploring their larger area. The other eaglets, #20-0744 [purple bumpers] and #20-0833 [pink bumpers] are making short flights and hanging out on higher perches with adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. The eaglets will start a daily exercise program once they are older and all of their flight feathers have grown in; typically, young eagles are released toward the end of summer. 

On April 30, a male fledgling Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Virginia Beach. The eaglet came from an active nest on Linkhorn Bay; part of the nest fell out of the tree on April 29, and one of the two young Bald Eaglets fell with it. The bird was not quite ready to start actively flying, and the eaglet was not able to be safely re-nested, so he was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator prior to being transferred to the Center. 

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

The two Bald Eaglets are doing well and growing in the A3 flight enclosure loft; the birds are confined to this space while they grow in their many flight feathers and start becoming more active. Bald Eaglet #20-0744 -- the male -- is marked with purple protective wing bumpers; his sister, #20-0803, has pink protective wing bumpers. Both birds are eating rats and fish and have gained weight since arriving at the Center. 

Bald Eagle 20-2251

On July 2, a juvenile Bald Eagle was found after it reportedly flew into a window and crash landed in Portsmouth, Virginia. Animal Control was able to contain the eagle, and took it to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for initial treatment. The following day, the eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: July 6, 2020

Unfortunately, Bald Eagle 20-2251 was found deceased in its enclosure on the evening of July 4.  Dr. Ernesto reports that this eagle was severely depressed in the morning, and supportive and critical care was attempted; sadly, the young bird did not respond to treatment.

Black Bear cubs of 2020

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 30, 2020

On the morning of June 30, Drs. Karra and Sarah and rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon were able to move three Black Bear cubs from the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure to the transition area of yard #2 in the Black Bear Complex. Kelsey reports: 

"We moved three bears to transition yard #2 today, and will open up the gate so they can have free access to bear yard #2 later today. As soon as everyone is settled, probably tomorrow, we will open the gate between BY2 and BY3 so all of the bears can mingle.

"Bears moved:

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 17, 2020

The Black Bear cubs of 2020 are all doing well -- the nine cubs currently in the Black Bear Complex are exploring, climbing trees, and generally seem to be enjoying their new space. At this point, all nine cubs are in Bear Yard #3; the Center needs to make a few repairs to a gate in yard #2 before the cubs can have access to that area, since they've proven to the rehabilitation staff that they can slip through an opening in the gate. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 11, 2020

On June 10, rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon weighed many of the Black Bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation  (LMI) enclosure. Several were more than 10 kg -- meaning that they could move to the Black Bear Complex! Cub #20-0106 [Double Pink Tag] -- a cub admitted at the end of February -- weighed in at 10.4 kg. The team re-ear-tagged the bear, since she had lost her tags at one point, and went ahead and moved her to the Bear Complex in yard #3. 

Five other bears were also ready to move -- and will be moved on Thursday, June 11 to yard #3. The cubs include: 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 3, 2020

Last week, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon separated the remaining 14 bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, with the goal of keeping the smallest cubs away from the larger cubs. Based on weights and behavior, the current split includes: 

The littles: (housed in the left side of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure) 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

The Wildlife Center staff are deeply saddened to report that Black Bear cub #20-0833 [Double Orange Tags] died on May 26. The bear appeared to be sleeping on the ground, though when other cubs moved the cub, it became clear that something was not quite right. Rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon quickly went to check on the situation and found Double Orange, deceased. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 25, 2020

Three of the 18 Black Bear cubs have been successfully moved to the Black Bear Complex! On Monday, May 25, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon moved Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag to the transition area of yard #2. Kelsey said that when the bears were introduced to this new space, they briefly sniffed the air, then noticed their grapes (always a favorite treat) in their food pile, and promptly started eating.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

With 17 Black Bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, the rehabilitation staff have their hands full trying to manage and feed this "sloth" of bear cubs! In general, the cubs are doing well and the staff are careful to monitor feeding times to ensure that the smaller cubs are getting their portion of formula. During the past weekend, the staff decided to separate the larger three cubs -- Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag -- into the left side of the Large Mammal enclosure.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 8, 2020

The Black Bear cubs in the Large Mammal enclosure have been doing well in the past week. On Thursday, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon got their intense workout of the week when they weighed all 13 cubs! All of the cubs except two gained weight; Double Green lost a small amount of weight, and Double White was static in weight. These two cubs will be weighed again on Monday. The largest of the bunch, Yellow Tag, weighed in at 11.6 kg! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 28, 2020

All of the cubs at the Center are doing well - all 12 of them are out and about in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. It takes quite a bit of formula to keep 12 bear cubs happy -- but fortunately due to a recent flash fundraiser on the Critter Cam moderated discussion, the rehabilitation staff have been able to buy plenty of specialized bear formula for this growing group. 

The cubs currently eat this much -- twice a day! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 23, 2020

On the night of April 22, Dr. Karra emailed an update on Double Pink Tag -- who had been intermittently quiet and lethargic this week: 

"I know there have been lots of people wanting an update on our Black Bear cub #20-0106, since she was reported to be lethargic and have some GI signs on Sunday night … so here it is! Rehab reported her lethargy to wax and wane the last few days, so we decided to bring her down to the clinic for a full assessment under anesthesia today.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 21, 2020

The eight Black Bear cubs are getting big! The older/larger three (Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag) in particular are getting to be a handful for the rehabilitation staff. Fortunately, a kind supporter sent four pairs of overalls to keep the staff protected from tiny bear paws with very long claws!  

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center's Large Mammal enclosure -- all are eating well and gaining weight quickly! 

#20-0106 (female) No Tag: 3.5 kg
#20-0107 (male) Yellow Tag: 6.9 kg
#20-0108 (female) White Tag: 4.2 kg
#20-0109 (male) Orange Tag: 4.8 kg

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 30, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are settling in well to their new playground in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure! The cubs are being bottle-fed multiple times a day and are also receiving "mush bowls" - bowls of soft veggies, fruits, and dog food covered in a thickened bear formula. The three larger cubs are bottle-fed twice a day, and the youngest cub [No Tag] is bottle-fed three times a day. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 25, 2020

The Black Bear cubs are doing well and gaining weight: 

#20-0106 (female) No Tag: 2.46 kg 
#20-0107 (male) Yellow Tag: 5.05 kg
#20-0108 (female) White Tag: 3.85 kg 
#20-0109 (male) Orange Tag: 4.30 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Peregrine Falcon #20-2029

On Monday, June 22, the Richmond Peregrine Falcon fledgling was admitted to the Wildlife Center. This young female falcon hatched on the Richmond Falcon Cam; thousands of people watched the chick grow up in downtown Richmond, Virginia. This is the same nesting location where Maggie, the Center's education Peregrine Falcon, hatched and grew up, though the young bird is no relation to Maggie. 

Latest Update: June 30, 2020

Peregrine Falcon #20-2029 has been doing well for the past few days; the falcon is in an outdoor flight pen, and staff members are encouraging the young falcon to fly several lengths of the flight pen each day. So far, the fledgling still has some difficulties taking off from the ground, but flies beautifully when she launches herself from a high perch. The vet team is hoping that a couple more days of exercise will help her improve as her feathers continue to grow.

Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU]

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: June 30, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] has been doing well in the Center's A1 flight pen during the past couple of weeks. While the eagle is not on a formal daily exercise program, the bird is housed with Bald Eagle #20-0994 who is being exercised regularly -- so RU is slowly building flight muscles again. 

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

On May 29, Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] was moved to flight pen A1. In this larger space, she'll be able to start a daily exercise program, to get her back in shape and ready for release. 

 

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] has been doing well in a small outdoor enclosure [C-pen] during the past week. The bird is readily eating on her own and has gained weight. In the next few days, the veterinary team anticipates that flight pen A1 will become available; the eagle will then be moved to this 100-foot space for assessment and flight conditioning. 

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] has been doing well at the Center during the past few days. The bird finished his course of medicated eyedrops on May 17, and an additional check of the injured left eye revealed that the vitreal hemorrhage -- the bleeding in the space between the lens and the retina of the eye -- had healed. The eagle hasn't been eating consistently, though many eagles don't eat as well on their own when they are confined to a crate in the Center's holding room. The bird is bright and alert, and was moved to a small outdoor enclosure on May 19. 

On May 10, an adult female Bald Eagle was admitted to the Center after she was likely hit by a vehicle in Portsmouth, Virginia. The eagle was first taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation for stabilization; wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher noted that the eagle was banded with both a silver federal band and a purple state band used by the Center for Conservation Biology. Band reports from the "RU" band indicated that the bird hatched in 2016 in a nest in Virginia Beach.

Latest Update: May 13, 2020

In the day following her admission, Bald Eagle #20-0918 [RU] was quiet but alert in her crate; Dr. Karra noted a small amount of blood around the bird's glottis [part of the bird's airway], indicating that the bird was still bleeding internally. The veterinary team continued offering the bird anti-inflammatories, medicated eyedrops, and fluids, while keeping the bird in a quiet location. On May 12, the eagle was a little brighter, and her respiratory rate was within normal limits. 

Bald Eagle #20-0994

On May 13, an adult Bald Eagle was found down in a field on a dead cow in Pittsylvania County. A DGIF Conservation Police Officer was able to contain the eagle, and took it to nearby Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for initial treatment. The following day, the eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: June 30, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0994 began exercise on June 11 and has been flying an average of seven to 13 passes of the 100' long flight pen during each daily exercise session. The eagle's stamina is improving, though the hot weather sometimes impacts the quality of the daily exercise session. The bird is able to gain lift and maintain height while in flight. 

On May 13, an adult Bald Eagle was found down in a field on a dead cow in Pittsylvania County. A DGIF Conservation Police Officer was able to contain the eagle, and took it to nearby Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for initial treatment. The following day, the eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: June 3, 2020

On May 30, Bald Eagle #20-0994 finished its course of oral chelation therapy for the subclinical level of lead toxicity in the bird's system. The following day, the staff re-checked the lead levels and found a reduced level of 0.003 ppm -- just a little above the "low" reading. The eagle has been eating well, and has indicated its preference for fish. 

On May 13, an adult Bald Eagle was found down in a field on a dead cow in Pittsylvania County. A DGIF Conservation Police Officer was able to contain the eagle, and took it to nearby Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for initial treatment. The following day, the eagle was transported to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

After Bald Eagle #20-0994 finished its course of chelation therapy last week, a repeat lead text revealed a "low" blood lead level, and the bird was moved to a small outdoor enclosure. Because lead can also be stored in the bones of an affected animal, the team decided to monitor the eagle in the outdoor space and re-test its lead levels in several days. On May 25, a repeat lead test revealed a level of 0.066 ppm, indicating that while the chelation therapy may have helped remove the lead from the eagle's blood, there was still lead in the bird's system.

Bald Eaglets #20-1128 and #20-1129

On May 20, two Bald Eaglets were admitted to the Wildlife Center from Stafford County, Virginia. The two male fledglings were found on the ground; the finders called animal control, who picked up the eaglets and brought them to the Wildlife Center. It's unknown if the parents were still in the area. 

Latest Update: June 25, 2020

The eaglets in the A3 flight pen have been doing well during the past months; the birds have become more and more active as they've grown. This weekend, the four eaglets will be moved to flight pen A2 so that some repair work can be done on the eagle loft area next week; once the repairs are done, two eagles will be moved back to A3, and two will remain in A2. This will allow the growing birds to utilize more space during regular daily exercise in preparation for their late summer release. 

On May 20, two Bald Eaglets were admitted to the Wildlife Center from Stafford County, Virginia. The two male fledglings were found on the ground; the finders called animal control, who picked up the eaglets and brought them to the Wildlife Center. It's unknown if the parents were still in the area. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2020

All four Bald Eaglets are doing well in the large A3 flight pen. The newest eagles, #20-1128 [lime green bumpers] and #20-1129 [no color of bumpers] fledged from the tower over the weekend, and are exploring their larger area. The other eaglets, #20-0744 [purple bumpers] and #20-0833 [pink bumpers] are making short flights and hanging out on higher perches with adult Bald Eagle #20-0172. The eaglets will start a daily exercise program once they are older and all of their flight feathers have grown in; typically, young eagles are released toward the end of summer. 

Great Horned Owlet #20-0437

On April 9, a young Great Horned Owlet was found in a homeowner's driveway in Caroline County, Virginia. The homeowners took the owlet to a local veterinary clinic before the young bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center. In the days following its admission, Center staff worked with the homeowners to determine if adult Great Horned Owls were present and active in the area; it's always best to re-nest young raptors when possible since being raised in the wild by wild parents is always the best option. Dr.

Latest Update: June 25, 2020

Papa G'Ho and the two young owlets are doing well in flight pen A2. The birds are growing up, and are eating well. Since the birds won't be old enough to successfully provide for themselves until the fall, they have several months yet at the Wildlife Center. This weekend, the rehabilitation staff will move the owl family to flight pen #5, so that the team can utilize A2 for the growing young eagle patients, which will be released later this summer.

On April 9, a young Great Horned Owlet was found in a homeowner's driveway in Caroline County, Virginia. The homeowners took the owlet to a local veterinary clinic before the young bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center. In the days following its admission, Center staff worked with the homeowners to determine if adult Great Horned Owls were present and active in the area; it's always best to re-nest young raptors when possible since being raised in the wild by wild parents is always the best option. Dr.

Latest Update: May 4, 2020

This past weekend, the rehabilitation staff moved Papa G'Ho and his two young charges to flight pen A2. This larger space will give the owlets plenty of room to start making larger and larger flights as they continue to grow. You can watch them on Critter Cam #2!

Great Horned Owlet #20-0154

 On March 7, 2020, a private citizen found a hatchling Great Horned owlet at the base of a tree below a damaged nest. They reported that the night before, they had endured high winds, likely resulting in the owlet's nest destruction. After admitting the owlet as a patient, the rehabilitation team asked the private citizen to keep an eye on the nest site, in case the parents were to return. Unfortunately, the parent owls were not seen again and the baby could not be returned to the nest site.

Latest Update: June 25, 2020

Papa G'Ho and the two young owlets are doing well in flight pen A2. The birds are growing up, and are eating well. Since the birds won't be old enough to successfully provide for themselves until the fall, they have several months yet at the Wildlife Center. This weekend, the rehabilitation staff will move the owl family to flight pen #5, so that the team can utilize A2 for the growing young eagle patients, which will be released later this summer.

 On March 7, 2020, a private citizen found a hatchling Great Horned owlet at the base of a tree below a damaged nest. They reported that the night before, they had endured high winds, likely resulting in the owlet's nest destruction. After admitting the owlet as a patient, the rehabilitation team asked the private citizen to keep an eye on the nest site, in case the parents were to return. Unfortunately, the parent owls were not seen again and the baby could not be returned to the nest site.

Latest Update: May 4, 2020

This past weekend, the rehabilitation staff moved Papa G'Ho and his two young charges to flight pen A2. This larger space will give the owlets plenty of room to start making larger and larger flights as they continue to grow. You can watch them on Critter Cam #2!

 On March 7, 2020, a private citizen found a hatchling Great Horned owlet at the base of a tree below a damaged nest. They reported that the night before, they had endured high winds, likely resulting in the owlet's nest destruction. After admitting the owlet as a patient, the rehabilitation team asked the private citizen to keep an eye on the nest site, in case the parents were to return. Unfortunately, the parent owls were not seen again and the baby could not be returned to the nest site.

Latest Update: April 24, 2020

Great Horned Owlet #20-0154 has been doing well and growing quickly! On April 7, the owlet was moved to Flight Pen 3, along with surrogate Papa G'Ho. This space will give the owlet plenty of room as it grows in its flight feathers and starts making its very first short flights. 

 

Black Bear cubs #20-0107, 20-0108, and 20-0109

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Black Bear cubs #20-0105 & #20-0106

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Cliff Swallows

On June 19, the Wildlife Center had an exceptionally busy afternoon -- when 98 new patients were admitted in a matter of minutes!

A bridge in Fredericksburg, Virginia, has been under construction this year; earlier this year, the Virginia Department of Transportation and Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries started talking with the Center about impacts on nesting swallows. DGIF officials asked if the Center could care for any displaced nestling birds -- and on June 19, we received 98 nestling and fledgling swallows!

Black Bear cub #20-1808

On June 18, a young female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center from Shenandoah County. The cub was reportedly hit by a vehicle on June 16; a rescuer saw the cub and brought the young bear into her house before calling the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer retrieved the cub the following day and brought the bear to the Center on June 18. 

Black Bear cub #20-1694

On June 12, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Rockbridge County. The bear had been seen wandering around a barn for several days with no sign of a sow; the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted and the decision was made to rescue the bear cub and bring him to the Wildlife Center. 

Black Bear cub #20-1118

On May 20, a male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center from Warren County, Virginia. The cub had been seen in the area for about a week with no sign of a mother bear; the cub was trapped and DGIF transported the young bear to the Wildlife Center. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0965, 0966, and 0967

On May 13, three more Black Bear cubs arrived at the Wildlife Center of Virginia! The cubs were found in Luray on May 12; the finder heard the cubs crying in a field behind a house. The bears were gathered and placed in a box for the night outside to see if the mother bear would come back for them, but sadly there was no sign of the sow by the next morning. DGIF instructed the finder to bring the cubs to the Wildlife Center. 

Black Bear cub #20-0698

On April 28, another Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center -- taking the current cub count up to 13! The female cub was found alone and crying in Dickenson County on April 24; a private citizen took the cub home and fed it evaporated milk throughout the weekend. On Monday, April 27, the cub was taken first to a local veterinary clinic and then transferred to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0646 and #20-0647

On the morning of April 25, the Wildlife Center admitted two more Black Bear cubs -- bringing the current cub tally to 12. These two cubs were found in Bath County; a private citizen saw the two young bears without a sow on April 19. On April 24, he saw them again and called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who responded to the call. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0589 and #20-0590

On April 21, two Black Bear cubs were admitted to the Wildlife Center from Prince Edward County. The two cubs were seen in a cow pasture on the morning of April 20; there was no sign of a sow for about 16 hours. When the DGIF biologists responded to the scene, one cub was in a tree, and the other was curled up in a ditch by the road. There were reports of an adult Black Bear sow in the area hit by a vehicle last week, though biologists were never able to locate the bear; they suspect that the incident causes these cubs to be orphaned. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0468, #20-0469, and #20-0470

At about 9:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 11, a Black Bear sow was hit and killed by a truck on I-64 in Rockbridge County. There were three cubs with her,  and the trucker called the state police. The cubs climbed about 50-60 feet up a nearby tree. 

Black Bear cub #20-0384

On Tuesday, April 7, another Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The tiny female cub was found alone in Buchanan County on April 6 and was taken to a local veterinary clinic before she spent the night at the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. 

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