Current Patients

Peregrine Falcon #19-0940

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: September 10, 2019

Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 was successfully released on Tuesday, September 10. About 40-50 people attended the release. Dr. Ernesto released the falcon facing the James River, with a perfect view of the very bridge where the young falcon hatched. The bird flew smoothly, circled the crowd, and flew off into the nearby trees.

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: September 5, 2019

Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 is ready for release! After pre-release blood work was completed on September 5, the veterinary and rehabilitation staff declared that this young bird was ready to be returned to the wild. The falcon will be released on Tuesday, September 10 at 12:00 noon at the JamesCrest Farm in Hopewell [1315 Ruffin Road, Hopewell, VA 23860].

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: September 4, 2019

After spending several weeks at Wildbunch Wildlife Refuge, Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 has shown excellent improvement in physical strength and stamina and is flying very well. Their team of permitted wildlife rehabilitators reported that the falcon was able to complete more than 30 passes within the specialized circular flight pen, and on September 1 the bird was re-admitted to the Wildlife Center in preparation for its release!

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: August 23, 2019

Within the past two months, the Center has attempted to find a permitted falconer who could take Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 to work on flight-conditioning. Unfortunately, no one has been able to take the bird. Peregrine Falcons can be difficult to fully condition in captivity in preparation for release; this is often why the Center collaborates with biologists and other officials to find potential hacking sites or alternative solutions.

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: June 27, 2019

Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 has been doing well at the Center; the bird has been eating well and growing in flight feathers for the past few weeks.

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: May 29, 2019

On May 28, Dr. Peach took follow-up radiograph of Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 to check on the bird’s healing keel fracture. She found that the injury was healed and stable, and placed the falcon in a C-pen enclosure. In this area, the bird has room to make short flights and hops, and will gradually be able to be more active.

The falcon has been eating more readily on its own since the bandage was removed last week. 

On May 14, a Peregrine Falcon chick fledged from its nest on the Benjamin Harrison Bridge in Prince George County and hit the road beneath the nest. Two cars drove over the young falcon without contact; the falcon was in the road for about 45 minutes before a registered transporter was able to successfully rescue the bird.

Latest Update: May 22, 2019

Peregrine Falcon #19-0940 has remained stable during the past week. Each day, the veterinary team monitors the bird’s respiratory rate along with its lung sounds. For the most part, the falcon has been breathing normally; occasionally the bird has an increased respiratory rate, but the lung and air sac sounds have been within normal limits, indicating that the ruptured air sac is not causing additional problems for the falcon.

Great Horned Owlet #19-0341

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: September 10, 2019

The two Great Horned Owlets in A2 are growing up – at a quick glance, it can be hard to tell the difference between the two owlets and their surrogate dad, Papa G’Ho! Last week, the rehabilitation staff started the young owls on daily exercise; at this point, both birds are flying somewhere between six to nine lengths of the flight pen during each session. The rehab staff are increasing the owlets' daily goal to 10 passes this week.

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: July 8, 2019

Great Horned Owlets #19-0223 and #19-0341, along with surrogate owl Papa G’Ho, were returned to their A2 flight enclosure on the morning of July 8. Last week, the staff were able to determine exactly where a raccoon was entering and exiting the flight enclosure, and several repairs and reinforcements were made. After the repairs were finished, the rehab staff set live traps in the A1 and A2 flight enclosure again to ensure that the raccoon was no longer able to get in. After multiple nights of not trapping anything, they determined it was safe to use the flight enclosures again.

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: June 6, 2019

The three Great Horned Owlets have been doing very well in the outdoor flight pen with Papa G’Ho.

Following a foot and feather check on June 3, wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey determined that the owl family could move to a larger space – one of the Center’s longest and tallest flight pens. In this space, the owlets will be able to practice flying as they get older, and the large birds will have more space to spread out and explore.

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: May 29, 2019

The owl family has been doing well during the past few weeks; the young owlets are increasingly active and have been exploring their flight pen.

On April 10, a Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 and its nest mate, owlet #19-0340, were transferred from a permitted wildlife rehabilitator to the Wildlife Center. Private citizens found the owlets after they fell from their nest.

Upon admission, the veterinary staff auscultated [listened to] the owlet’s heart and lungs and heard a heart murmur and crackles in the lungs.  Heart murmurs are not unremarkable in young birds, but it will need to be monitored. Crackles in the lungs indicate possible trauma or fluid in the lungs, though nothing unusual was identified on radiographs.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Great Horned Owlet #19-0341 is doing well and gaining weight -- the owl weighed 1.1 kilograms as of April 29.  On April 26, the rehabilitation began acclimating the owlet outside; each morning, the bird’s crate was moved into a flight pen with the Center’s surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho and the two other owlets currently in his care [owlets #19-0148 and

Great Horned Owlet #19-0223

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: September 10, 2019

The two Great Horned Owlets in A2 are growing up – at a quick glance, it can be hard to tell the difference between the two owlets and their surrogate dad, Papa G’Ho! Last week, the rehabilitation staff started the young owls on daily exercise; at this point, both birds are flying somewhere between six to nine lengths of the flight pen during each session. The rehab staff are increasing the owlets' daily goal to 10 passes this week.

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: July 8, 2019

Great Horned Owlets #19-0223 and #19-0341, along with surrogate owl Papa G’Ho, were returned to their A2 flight enclosure on the morning of July 8. Last week, the staff were able to determine exactly where a raccoon was entering and exiting the flight enclosure, and several repairs and reinforcements were made. After the repairs were finished, the rehab staff set live traps in the A1 and A2 flight enclosure again to ensure that the raccoon was no longer able to get in. After multiple nights of not trapping anything, they determined it was safe to use the flight enclosures again.

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: June 6, 2019

The three Great Horned Owlets have been doing very well in the outdoor flight pen with Papa G’Ho.

Following a foot and feather check on June 3, wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey determined that the owl family could move to a larger space – one of the Center’s longest and tallest flight pens. In this space, the owlets will be able to practice flying as they get older, and the large birds will have more space to spread out and explore.

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: May 29, 2019

The owl family has been doing well during the past few weeks; the young owlets are increasingly active and have been exploring their flight pen.

On March 10, a young Great Horned Owl was found in Virginia Beach and was taken to Nature's Nanny Wildlife Rehabilitation, a local permitted wildlife rehabilitation group. On March 29, the bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center so that the young bird could continue to grow up with an adult Great Horned Owl – surrogate Papa G’Ho.

Latest Update: May 2, 2019

Since moving to an outdoor enclosure, Great Horned Owlets #19-0148 and #19-0223 have been doing well. The two birds have been in a flight pen with surrogate Great Horned Owl Papa G’Ho since April 8. In this time, both owlets have gained weight; owlet #19-0148 now weighs 1.44 kg and #19-0223 weighs 1.12 kg.

The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together. Owlet #19-0223 is wearing a blue band and owlet #19-0148 is wearing a yellow band.

Bobcat #19-2408

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: September 9, 2019

After the Black Bear cubs recently moved from the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure to the Black Bear Complex, the rehabilitation staff decided to weigh Bobcat #19-2408 on September 6 to see if she was large enough to move to the Large Mammal enclosure. The bobcat weighed 1.89 kg – which was less than the rehabilitation staff was expecting. The Bobcat has been eating well, so the rehabilitation staff increased the kitten’s food, and also collected a fecal sample.

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: August 27, 2019

Bobcat kitten #19-2408 has been doing well in the Center's Bear Pen enclosure; the wildlife rehabilitation staff check on the kitten each day when they drop off food, though the staff note that they don't always readily see the young elusive cat. This is an excellent sign; raising a lone bobcat kitten isn't ideal, but fortunately, this young animal doesn't want anything to do with humans. 

Black Bear cubs of 2019

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 29, 2019

On August 28, the rehabilitation team successfully moved the 2019 Black Bear cubs to the Bear Complex! Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey and wildlife rehab intern Kylee were unable to safely trap the cubs in a zinger crate, choosing instead to dart and anesthetize both of the bears within the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. After Dr. Ernesto conducted a visual examination both of the cubs spent the night in a smaller transition area within the complex, giving them plenty of time to acclimate to their new environment.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 27, 2019

After months of repairs and work on the Bear Complex, the two-acre facility is once again ready to house bears!  Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey and rehabilitation intern Kylee will do a final walk-through and fence test on the morning of August 28. If all checks out, the two cubs will be moved to yard #1 later that day. The rehabilitation staff will try to trap the two cups in a zinger crate [without sedation] for moving. Watch for them when Critter Cam changes to the bear yard!

In the meantime, the cubs have been enjoying a variety of food and enrichment – including live fish!

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 9, 2019

Repairs and preparation of the Black Bear Complex continue, though are not yet complete! The plumbing issues have been fixed, though the construction company will be back one more time to work on a sliding door gate to one of the bear yards, which is difficult to open due to erosion issues. An amazing crew of volunteers has been working on trimming all the tree limbs around the fences; this work is nearly complete.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: July 18, 2019

Despite the high temperatures, the two Black Bear cubs have been quite active in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure lately! Critter Cam viewers have been able to capture the cubs using the ceiling of the enclosure like a set of monkey bars.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: July 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure; last week, the wildlife rehabilitation staff opened up the connecting chute between both sides of the enclosure, to allow the cubs to have access to both sides.

Construction crews have been working on Black Bear Complex repairs during the past month; they have been able to fix a broken pipe and several valves in the water system throughout the two-acre complex. There are still some additional plumbing issues to adjust in the next two weeks.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 24, 2019

Orange Tag continues to be a picky eater; the rehabilitation staff have continued to offer a wide variety of foods, and it appears that the cub typically eats novel food items, then loses interest the next time it is offered. 

On Saturday, Dr. Karra administered additional anti-nausea medication and an appetite stimulant. The bear has the full run of the right side of the Large Mammal enclosure but is still separate from the other two cubs so that he has full access to his food and so the rehabilitation staff can closely monitor all food intake.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 20, 2019

Orange Tag ate about 60% of his meal overnight; rather than eating the A/D again, he mostly ate baby food and canned dog food. The cub only lost 200 grams, and while the rehabilitation staff would prefer that the cub gain, 200 grams is a small loss. The rehabilitation team offered a variety of foods once again, this time adding baby food on top of the A/D diet. 

If the cub's appetite decreases again, the staff will order more anti-nausea medications, along with an appetite stimulant. 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 19, 2019

Wildlife rehabilitation intern Kylee reported that Orange Tag ate his second meal of A/D during the day on June 18. For the evening feeding, she offered more A/D, plus a mush bowl. On the morning of June 19, wildlife rehabilitator Shannon found that the cub had eaten about half of the A/D, but showed no interest in the mush bowl. The cub is feisty and bluff charging the rehabilitation staff as normal.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 18, 2019

On the afternoon of June 17, Dr. Karra anesthetized Black Bear cub #19-1176 [Orange Tag] for radiographs and an ultrasound to see if any abdominal masses or obstruction could be seen. The small bear cub was extremely feisty before anesthesia – even though the cub has not been eating the past few days, he is not acting sick.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

Rehabilitators Shannon and Kylee assessed Black Bear cub Orange Tag this morning and found that, once again, he did not eat last night’s food. He did gain a small amount of weight but generally was not interested in today’s food either, which is highly unusual.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

The trio of Black Bear cubs have been entertaining a variety of Critter Cam viewers. They appear to enjoy sleeping in their hammock but often wake up for wild play sessions throughout the day. Orange Tag has been playing and sleeping with his new sisters, though the two larger females are typically first to arrive at the mush bowls once they are delivered. The staff have been carefully monitoring the cubs’ food intake.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 10, 2019

Black Bear cub Orange Tag has been recovering from his forehead laceration; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon noted that the wound looked a little open over the weekend, though it appears as though it was a small area and no additional sutures were needed. Dr. Karra carefully applied a topical ointment to prevent flystrike.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 7, 2019

The two Black Bear Cub sisters [No Tag and White Tag] are currently being fed just once a day; each cub gets a mush bowl, plus a shared “juvenile” bear meal that weighs six pounds! The juvenile meal contains fruits, veggies, seeds, greens, and dog food. The rehabilitation team reports that the two sisters are doing well and remain quite wild and feisty. The cubs are still being treated with a topical antifungal spray, though this treatment is increasingly difficult.

Bald Eagle #19-1573

On June 13, an adult Bald Eagle was rescued in Accomack County. The bird was found eating in a ditch near a poultry processing plant and was unable to fly away. A local wildlife rehabilitator rescued the eagle; although the bird was unable to fly, it was feisty and mobile, and the rehabilitator had to chase the grounded bird through briars to rescue it. Once the eagle was captured, the rehabilitator transferred the bird to the Wildlife Center for assessment and treatment.

Latest Update: August 23, 2019

Bald Eagles #19-1013 and #19-1573 were successfully released at Mutton Hunk Fen Natural Area Preserve on Friday, August 23. There were nearly 100 people at the release; both birds flew off well back in their home county. 

 

 

On June 13, an adult Bald Eagle was rescued in Accomack County. The bird was found eating in a ditch near a poultry processing plant and was unable to fly away. A local wildlife rehabilitator rescued the eagle; although the bird was unable to fly, it was feisty and mobile, and the rehabilitator had to chase the grounded bird through briars to rescue it. Once the eagle was captured, the rehabilitator transferred the bird to the Wildlife Center for assessment and treatment.

Latest Update: August 20, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-1573 and Bald Eaglet #19-1013 have been doing well for the past week; both eagles were scheduled for a blood draw on Monday, August 19 for pre-release analysis. Results were within normal limits, and both birds were cleared for release back to Accomack County, where each eagle was rescued earlier this summer. No GPS transmitters are currently available for the eagles. 

On June 13, an adult Bald Eagle was rescued in Accomack County. The bird was found eating in a ditch near a poultry processing plant and was unable to fly away. A local wildlife rehabilitator rescued the eagle; although the bird was unable to fly, it was feisty and mobile, and the rehabilitator had to chase the grounded bird through briars to rescue it. Once the eagle was captured, the rehabilitator transferred the bird to the Wildlife Center for assessment and treatment.

Latest Update: July 31, 2019

The condition of Bald Eagle #19-1573’s feathers have improved during the past month, and shortly after Bald Eagle #19-1666 was released on July 26, the bird was moved to the Center’s largest outdoor flight pen (A3). On July 31, rehabilitation staff began a daily exercise regimen to improve the eagle’s strength and stamina, and monitor the bird’s flight.

On June 13, an adult Bald Eagle was rescued in Accomack County. The bird was found eating in a ditch near a poultry processing plant and was unable to fly away. A local wildlife rehabilitator rescued the eagle; although the bird was unable to fly, it was feisty and mobile, and the rehabilitator had to chase the grounded bird through briars to rescue it. Once the eagle was captured, the rehabilitator transferred the bird to the Wildlife Center for assessment and treatment.

Latest Update: June 28, 2019

On the morning of June 28, Dr. Karra bathed Bald Eagle #19-1573 with help from veterinary technician Jess and rehabilitation intern Kylee. Using a Dawn dish soap solution, Dr. Karra scrubbed the eagle’s feather with a toothbrush; at the end of the lengthy process, the feathers were mostly clean but there were still some areas with the sticky substance. They placed the eagle into a cage with a fan to blow dry the eagle’s feathers before moving the bird back outside to an outdoor enclosure.

Bald Eagle #19-1013

On May 19, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted an immature Bald Eagle from Accomack County. The bird was seen standing on a woodpile for an extended amount of time; rescuers noted that the bird was often hanging his head and appeared to be unable to fly. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator before a registered volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Center.

Latest Update: August 23, 2019

Bald Eagles #19-1013 and #19-1573 were successfully released at Mutton Hunk Fen Natural Area Preserve on Friday, August 23. There were nearly 100 people at the release; both birds flew off well back in their home county. 

 

 

On May 19, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted an immature Bald Eagle from Accomack County. The bird was seen standing on a woodpile for an extended amount of time; rescuers noted that the bird was often hanging his head and appeared to be unable to fly. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator before a registered volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Center.

Latest Update: August 20, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-1573 and Bald Eaglet #19-1013 have been doing well for the past week; both eagles were scheduled for a blood draw on Monday, August 19 for pre-release analysis. Results were within normal limits, and both birds were cleared for release back to Accomack County, where each eagle was rescued earlier this summer. No GPS transmitters are currently available for the eagles. 

On May 19, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted an immature Bald Eagle from Accomack County. The bird was seen standing on a woodpile for an extended amount of time; rescuers noted that the bird was often hanging his head and appeared to be unable to fly. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator before a registered volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Center.

Latest Update: August 13, 2019

Bald Eaglets #19-1678 and #19-1013 have been doing well in flight pen A3 this summer. Both started exercise on July 31, and quickly advanced to the optimum level of exercise; both birds are flying at least 15 passes perch-to-perch during their daily exercise. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey will assess the young eaglets this week to see if the team can start thinking about a release later this month.

On May 19, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admitted an immature Bald Eagle from Accomack County. The bird was seen standing on a woodpile for an extended amount of time; rescuers noted that the bird was often hanging his head and appeared to be unable to fly. The bird was captured and taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator before a registered volunteer transporter drove the eagle to the Center.

Latest Update: July 2, 2019

Bald Eaglet #19-1013 has been doing well in the A3 flight enclosure during the past few weeks, and has been joined by several other recovering eagle patients! As of July 1, the Center is caring for six Bald Eagle patients; young Bald Eagle #19-1013 currently has the advantage of a fellow eaglet “nestmate” as well as two adult Bald Eagles. Check out Critter Cam 3 – we alternate between showing “Eagle Cam” and “Owl Cam”!

Bald Eagle #19-1678

On June 17, a private citizen in Poquoson, Virginia saw an immature Bald Eagle on the ground and called the local police department. An officer went to the rescue location and called local permitted wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher, who in turn, called a local registered volunteer transporter who regularly makes trips between Hampton Roads and the Wildlife Center. The eagle sat on a bench before it hopped off and was able to be captured.

Latest Update: August 21, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-1678 was successfully released on August 21 at South Lawson Park on Poquoson. There were nearly 100 people in attendance; the eagle flew off toward the treeline and out of sight. 

Photos Courtesy of Barb Melton: 

On June 17, a private citizen in Poquoson, Virginia saw an immature Bald Eagle on the ground and called the local police department. An officer went to the rescue location and called local permitted wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher, who in turn, called a local registered volunteer transporter who regularly makes trips between Hampton Roads and the Wildlife Center. The eagle sat on a bench before it hopped off and was able to be captured.

Latest Update: August 20, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-1678 has been doing well the past week; on August 19, blood was drawn for a pre-release analysis. The veterinary team noted that the eaglet has some missing feathers directly on top of his skull, though Dr. Karra notes that this should not impede release. Dr. Karra was happy to report that blood work was within normal limits and the eaglet was cleared for release.  The state eagle biologist does not currently have available GPS transmitter units for the eagle. 

On June 17, a private citizen in Poquoson, Virginia saw an immature Bald Eagle on the ground and called the local police department. An officer went to the rescue location and called local permitted wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher, who in turn, called a local registered volunteer transporter who regularly makes trips between Hampton Roads and the Wildlife Center. The eagle sat on a bench before it hopped off and was able to be captured.

Latest Update: August 13, 2019

Bald Eaglets #19-1678 and #19-1013 have been doing well in flight pen A3 this summer. Both started exercise on July 31, and quickly advanced to the optimum level of exercise; both birds are flying at least 15 passes perch-to-perch during their daily exercise. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey will assess the young eaglets this week to see if the team can start thinking about a release later this month.

On June 17, a private citizen in Poquoson, Virginia saw an immature Bald Eagle on the ground and called the local police department. An officer went to the rescue location and called local permitted wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher, who in turn, called a local registered volunteer transporter who regularly makes trips between Hampton Roads and the Wildlife Center. The eagle sat on a bench before it hopped off and was able to be captured.

Latest Update: July 2, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-1678 has been in the raptor tower portion of the A3 flight enclosure for the past week; though the doors of this balcony area were opened late last week, the young eaglet has not yet “fledged” from his nesting area. The other eagles in the enclosure have been seen visiting and calling to the young bird.

On June 17, a private citizen in Poquoson, Virginia saw an immature Bald Eagle on the ground and called the local police department. An officer went to the rescue location and called local permitted wildlife rehabilitator Dana Lusher, who in turn, called a local registered volunteer transporter who regularly makes trips between Hampton Roads and the Wildlife Center. The eagle sat on a bench before it hopped off and was able to be captured.

Latest Update: June 24, 2019

As of June 19, just two days after admission, Bald Eaglet #19-1678’s heart rate was within normal limits again. The eagle generally became brighter and more alert in the week following its admission and began eating and gaining weight. The staff and students noted that the eagle was bearing weight equally on both legs, and by June 21, there was no swelling noted on the eaglet’s right leg.

Turkey Vulture #19-2282

On July 20, citizens found a young Turkey Vulture by the side of the road in Franklin County, Virginia. There were no adult vultures present, and due to the odd location, they decided to take the bird to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. The following day, the vulture was transferred to the Wildlife Center for further treatment.

Latest Update: August 13, 2019

By August 1, Turkey Vulture #19-2282 had gained nearly 500 grams, and weighed in at 1.47 kg. On August 2, the veterinary team anesthetized the young bird for follow-up radiographs and blood work. No more metal objects were seen in the bird’s GI tract, indicating that the vulture had fully passed all of the suspected pieces of lead. A repeat lead test showed a level of 0.084 ppm – a low level no longer requiring treatment.

On July 20, citizens found a young Turkey Vulture by the side of the road in Franklin County, Virginia. There were no adult vultures present, and due to the odd location, they decided to take the bird to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. The following day, the vulture was transferred to the Wildlife Center for further treatment.

Latest Update: July 30, 2019

Turkey Vulture #19-2282 is doing well; the young bird is readily devouring its twice-daily meals of whole rats. Wildlife rehabilitators Kylee and Shannon both proudly took video of their young charge eating its first couple of meals!

 

 

Black Bear cub #19-0546 [No Tag]

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 31, 2019

The Black Bear cub “sisters” are growing up! At this week’s weigh-in,  No Tag was 5.2 kg, and White Tag was unable to be picked up for weighing. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey reported that the two are very feisty and have zero interest in humans; she and fellow rehabilitator Shannon decided that since both cubs are more than 5.0 kg and very difficult to handle, they won't be weighed until they are fully weaned and ready to go to the Complex. White Tag has been very protective of her smaller introduced sister.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 22, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Large Mammal enclosure, as many Critter Cam viewers have seen for themselves!

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 15, 2019

On the afternoon of May 14, the two Black Bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and are now on cam! Check out Critter Cam 2 to watch Cub Cam.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cub "sisters" are doing well; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon recorded a couple of video clips during a recent playtime. The cubs are more quiet and wary than past cubs – while the two enjoy playing with one another, they’re always careful to keep a watchful eye on the humans who are present.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Black Bear cubs #19-0492 and #19-0546 [Pink] are both growing quickly; they’re eating “mush bowls” three times a day and are gaining weight. At last weigh-in, #19-0492 weighed 4.20 kg and #19-0546 [Pink] was 3.11 kg.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs -- #19-0492 and #19-0546 – are both doing well and enjoying each other’s company. Both have gained weight since arrival and are eating well; #19-0492 prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a bowl, instead of a bottle and weighs 2.95 kg. The newer bear has been bottle-feeding well though within the past couple days, is transitioning to bowl feeding as well. The cubs are becoming more active, according to the rehab staff.

Black Bear cub #19-0492 [White Tag]

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 31, 2019

The Black Bear cub “sisters” are growing up! At this week’s weigh-in,  No Tag was 5.2 kg, and White Tag was unable to be picked up for weighing. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey reported that the two are very feisty and have zero interest in humans; she and fellow rehabilitator Shannon decided that since both cubs are more than 5.0 kg and very difficult to handle, they won't be weighed until they are fully weaned and ready to go to the Complex. White Tag has been very protective of her smaller introduced sister.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 22, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Large Mammal enclosure, as many Critter Cam viewers have seen for themselves!

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 15, 2019

On the afternoon of May 14, the two Black Bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and are now on cam! Check out Critter Cam 2 to watch Cub Cam.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cub "sisters" are doing well; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon recorded a couple of video clips during a recent playtime. The cubs are more quiet and wary than past cubs – while the two enjoy playing with one another, they’re always careful to keep a watchful eye on the humans who are present.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Black Bear cubs #19-0492 and #19-0546 [Pink] are both growing quickly; they’re eating “mush bowls” three times a day and are gaining weight. At last weigh-in, #19-0492 weighed 4.20 kg and #19-0546 [Pink] was 3.11 kg.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs -- #19-0492 and #19-0546 – are both doing well and enjoying each other’s company. Both have gained weight since arrival and are eating well; #19-0492 prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a bowl, instead of a bottle and weighs 2.95 kg. The newer bear has been bottle-feeding well though within the past couple days, is transitioning to bowl feeding as well. The cubs are becoming more active, according to the rehab staff.