Current Patients

Black Bear yearling #19-0097

On the evening of February 9, a yearling Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center as patient #19-0097. The female bear was found in a cornfield in Shenandoah County and was having a difficult time walking. Two DGIF biologists were able to contain the bear and transported her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 15, 2019

On the afternoon of February 14, the veterinary team sedated Black Bear yearling #19-0097 to examine her paws. The abrasions on her paw pads (first noted during the admission examination) had worsened during the past several days while the bear was housed in a crate. It’s possible the bear had suffered some mild frostbite on her paws in the wild and the dead skin is now sloughing off.

Red-tailed Hawk #19-0062

On the afternoon of January 27, a citizen in Nelson County found an immature Red-tailed Hawk in his back yard; he suspected that the neighbor’s dog had attacked the bird. The following morning, he transported the hawk to the Center, where it was admitted as patient #19-0062.

Latest Update: February 11, 2019

Sadly, on the morning of February 7, the staff found Red-tailed Hawk #19-0062 deceased in his enclosure.

The veterinary students conducted a necropsy on the hawk that afternoon to see what they could learn about this hawk’s internal injuries. No pericardial effusion [fluid around the heart] was noted as it was on admission, and the chambers and valves of the bird’s heart were within normal limits. Unfortunately, there were significant changes to the bird’s lungs, liver, and kidneys.

Black Bear yearling #19-0057

On January 25, a small female Black Bear yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Bentonville, Virginia. The thin and lethargic bear was found on a private citizen’s porch the day before. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries arranged for the bear to spend the night at Blue Ridge Wildlife Center before she was transferred to the Center the next day.

Latest Update: February 11, 2019

On Friday, February 8, Dr. Karra anesthetized Black Bear yearling #19-0057 for a follow-up examination. Dr. Karra gave a full report of the exam:

“The bear weighed 8.6 kg today (an increase of 2.2 kg since admission). She is still thin, but in better body condition than on admission. Her physical exam was within normal limits, with the exception of a small old healing abrasion on one of her paw pads. A skin scraping was performed, which revealed one dead ursacroptes mite. No sarcoptes mites were identified.

On January 25, a small female Black Bear yearling was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Bentonville, Virginia. The thin and lethargic bear was found on a private citizen’s porch the day before. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries arranged for the bear to spend the night at Blue Ridge Wildlife Center before she was transferred to the Center the next day.

Latest Update: February 4, 2019

Black Bear yearling #19-0057 has been doing well since she was moved to the outdoor Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; she’s eating well and is actively moving around and climbing. On Friday, February 8, the bear will be sedated for a follow-up skin scraping to check for mange mites. She’ll also be weighed, which will give the rehab and vet staff a better idea of when she might be able to move to the complex (when mange-free).

Bald Eagle #19-0031

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: February 7, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031 has made improvements during the three weeks following surgery. Although the bird was initially not eating well, her appetite has improved tremendously; the veterinary staff say she is now “ravenous” and readily eats the whole rat and fish that are offered to her each day. The bird’s fungal and yeast infections (likely caused by post-surgical antibiotics) have now cleared.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 29, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031’s surgical site has been healing well during the past ten days. Following surgery, the veterinary team gavage-fed the eagle to limit the stress put on the patient’s digestive tract; gavage-feeding involves inserting a tube down the bird’s throat and feeding a liquid diet.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 21, 2019

Bald Eagle #19-0031 has been doing well in the days following her surgery. The bird has been bright and alert, and Dr. Karra notes that the eagle is exceptionally strong.

The veterinary team has been checking the surgical site on the eagle’s wing each day; the left ulna is swollen and bruised but is only showing a minor amount of discharge around the pin sites. The eagle is receiving laser therapy each day before her wing is re-bandaged and wrapped.

On January 15, an adult female Bald Eagle was rescued by a Newport News Parks and Recreation ranger after the bird was hit by a car. After a veterinary clinic in Yorktown assessed and stabilized the eagle, a volunteer transported the bird to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 18, 2019

On the afternoon of January 17, Drs. Ernesto and Peach took Bald Eagle #19-0031 to surgery to repair the eagle’s broken left wing and to remove the fish hook. Dr. Ernesto decided to try one more time to endoscopically remove the hook using a grasper attachment. He was able to grasp the hook, but felt a lot of resistance; it was difficult for the team to get a full understanding of what exactly the entire lure looked like. The team decided to open up the eagle’s abdomen and stomach and retrieve the hook that way.

Gray Treefrog #19-0004

On January 2, Gray Treefrog #19-0004 was admitted to the Center – an unusual patient for this time of year.

In December, homeowners in Augusta County were moving potted plants indoors and shortly after, they observed a frog hopping around their house. Treefrogs in Virginia enter brumation – a type of hibernation specific to amphibians and reptiles. The frog’s brumation was unintentionally interrupted, likely by being brought into the warm house. Eventually, the homeowners were able to capture the frog and bring it to the Center for assessment and care.  

Latest Update: January 21, 2019

Gray Treefrog #19-0004 has been doing well at the Center this month; the frog is readily eating a diet of crickets and mealworms and has gained 3.48 grams since admission. The rehabilitation staff checks on the frog every day to ensure the frog has a clean enclosure and enough food. The veterinary team does a full health check every Thursday, just to ensure the frog remains healthy while it overwinters at the Center.

American Toad #18-3152

On December 26, American Toad #18-3152 was admitted to the Center from Albemarle County. The toad was observed in the road, bleeding and unable to hop; the rescuer initially thought she had been hit by a car.

Latest Update: January 21, 2019

American Toad #18-3152 has been doing well at the Center; the toad has gained a whopping 31 grams and now weighs 69 grams! The toad is eating a diet of mealworms and crickets and is typically fed every day; the rehabilitation staff have been adjusting the amount of food to ensure the toad doesn’t gain too much while she continues to overwinter at the Wildlife Center. Each Thursday, the veterinary staff perform a quick health check; they are particularly careful to see if the toad is edematous [retaining too much fluid] – which can result from a fluid imbalance.

Black Bear cubs of 2018

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: January 17, 2019

On January 17, the bear cubs celebrated their “Parturition Day”– there was a celebration for their collective birthdays!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: January 3, 2019

The 11 Black Bear cubs in yard #3 of the Center’s Black Bear Complex are all doing well. They’ve put on a good bit of weight this past fall; since we’re now in winter, the rehabilitation staff have cut back on the bears' food and are fasting the bears on Sunday. It’s more likely that the bears still have plenty of food to pick from on that particular day of the week, but by not offering fresh bags and buckets of food, the bears will stay at a healthier weight.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: November 19, 2018

On Thursday afternoon, November 15, the Wildlife Center lost power and suffered damage to fences and outbuildings during a severe ice storm. Portions of the Bear Complex were damaged, including a broken water line and several areas of fencing.

In order to make repairs and secure the 11 Black Bear cubs in the complex, the rehabilitation team is planning to shift the cubs to Yard 3 – where adult Black Bear #18-2293 was housed.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 28, 2018

Wildlife rehabilitation intern Shannon reports that all of the cubs are doing well in the Bear Complex – they are exploring, climbing, and utilizing all of their one-acre space. Shannon says that the bears are fairly wary of their next-door neighbor, adult bear #18-1952.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 23, 2018

The Black Bear cubs of 2018 were successfully moved to the Bear Complex on Thursday, August 23!

Dr. Peach sedated the bears so that she could draw blood for the final week of her mange medication study. All of the bears are in excellent shape, and are quite large! The bears were weighed before the move:

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 10, 2018

The 11 Black Bear cubs have been doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; the cubs are eating well and growing quickly! The wildlife rehabilitation team will be happy to move the bears to the Bear Complex in two weeks. At this point, the plan is to allow the cubs to roam in yard #1 and yard #2 in the complex, which will give all 11 cubs access to a one-acre area.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: July 26, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well; they are eating, growing, playing, and enjoying their daily enrichment! The wildlife rehabilitation team have been taking short videos of various enrichment items that are introduced to the cubs – including:

Bamboo “wind chimes”:

 

Creative firehose toys, stuffed with goodies:

 

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: July 6, 2018

The 11 Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The bears were fully weaned from their “mush bowls” this week, and are now eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, seeds, insects, and greens. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie said that none of the bears seemed to miss their mush bowls in the past two days, and the cubs are eating a lot more “adult foods” now, which means the Wildlife Center kitchen is going through a good bit of produce!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 25, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center; they are all still receiving one mush bowl each, plus an ever-expanding “adult” diet of fruits, vegetables, seeds, and insects. All cubs have been weaned from their bottle feedings and soon will be weaned from their bear formula mush bowls entirely – wildlife rehabilitator Brie anticipates discontinuing mush for most of the cubs at the start of July, though the smallest cub, #18-1089 [Double Pink] may continue to receive a mush bowl while she’s housed separately.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 18, 2018

Last week, the cubs began Dr. Peach’s study on a new drug for treating mange in Black Bears. The cubs received the medication on Thursday and had blood draws on Friday; everything went smoothly. Dr. Peach had the opportunity to check each cub thoroughly during the blood draw process; she said all 10 cubs appeared to be in good condition. Some of the cubs still have some hair loss due to ringworm, but overall, they look good and no additional hair loss has developed.  The next blood draw for the study will take place on Thursday, June 21.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 12, 2018

The 10 Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure; they are sampling a variety of different foods that have been introduced to their diet – apples, pomegranates, other fruits, and greens. Each cub is also receiving a mush bowl daily, and Orange, Green, and Red tagged bears are also still bottle-feeding once a day, though as of June 11, Brie noted that they showed less interest.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 4, 2018

The eight black bear cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure are doing well and gaining weight. On Thursday, May 31, the rehabilitation staff weighed the cubs, most for the last time without sedation; they are now too big and strong to be handled and weighed while awake. The staff will continue to weigh Double Green tag until he reaches 5 kg.

Current weights [5/31] are:

Green Tag: 8.1 kgs
Orange Tag: 8.25 kgs
No Tag: 7.6 kgs
Pink Tag: 7 kgs
Red: 5.9 kgs
Yellow Tag: 8.4 kgs
White Tag: 6.6 kgs
Double Green Tags: 3.4 kgs

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 23, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; cub #8 will be joining them soon! Last week, the Center admitted another Black Bear cub, but since he only weighed 2.5 kg at admission, he has some weight to put on first before joining the others in the main enclosures. At today’s weigh-in, he was 2.7 kg – so should be able to come out of his Zinger crate in the next week. 

 

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 10, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well since their move to the Large Mammal enclosure earlier this week. The former Green Tag was unhappy to be separated from her siblings as her ear healed, but fortunately on the evening of May 9, wildlife rehabilitator Brie examined it and thought it was healed enough to be introduced to the others. All seven cubs are housed together in one side of the Large Mammal enclosure; the rehab staff will get the other side ready in the next couple of days so that the cubs have more space to play! Watch them on Critter Cam 3.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 9, 2018

During the past week, the rehabilitation staff have been carefully monitoring the lesions on Pink Tag’s face; No Tag and (future) Red Tag also developed some small patches of hair loss. The staff took several hair samples and the Center’s diagnostic team started a DTM  (dermatophyte test medium) to check for the ringworm fungus. On Monday, May 7, results came back positive for ringworm growth. The technicians were able to “type” the ringworm and concluded that the bears have a highly contagious form of the fungus.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 4, 2018

The seven bear cubs are doing well at the Center; the wildlife rehabilitation team looking forward to getting at least half of these rambunctious cubs into the Large Mammal enclosure area as soon as possible! Within the next week, a few door repairs should be complete, and the cubs that weigh more than 3.0 kgs will be able to move.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 26, 2018

Wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that the bear cubs are enjoying their new space in the sheltered outdoor Metal Cage Complex. Most of the other small enclosures used for housing raptors have been cleared out of the space so that the bear cubs have plenty of room to run around during their play sessions. The rehabilitation team even constructed a fun jungle gym for the cubs, though Brie notes that the cubs are also happy trying to climb the walls and door!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 23, 2018

The five Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center; they continue to eat three times a day and are increasingly energetic and playful with one another. Brie reports that cub #18-0383, the newest cub admitted, has been a little more lethargic than the other cubs; he may just be settling in and adjusting to his new siblings, but the cub will have blood drawn later this week for another analysis.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 17, 2018

Here's a glimpse into the playtime of four growing Black Bear cubs ... 

 

 

Black Bear cub #18-2926 [Pink/Orange Tags]

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: January 8, 2019

This past weekend, the rehabilitation staff have been keeping a close eye on the four bears in yard #1 of the Black Bear Complex – particularly Pink/Orange Tag. On Saturday, rehabilitator Kelsey reported, “Good news, all. Today, ‘elbow bear’ was our highest climber, up ~50 ft. in a tree.”

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: January 3, 2019

On January 3, Black Bear #18-2926 [Pink/Orange Tags aka “elbow bear”] was darted and anesthetized for a follow-up examination and radiographs. The staff have been carefully observing the bear during the last few weeks; the bear will occasionally hold her old injured limb close to her body, but she does place the leg normally and has been seen climbing logs in the Large Mammal enclosure.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: December 4, 2018

On Friday, November 30, Black Bear cub #18-2926 was anesthetized for radiographs to check on the healing progress of the bear’s fractured elbow. The cub has not been walking properly on his front limb, and based on observation, appeared to have a limited range of motion.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: October 26, 2018

On October 25, Black Bear cub #18-2926 was shifted from a zinger crate to the connecting chute in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Rehabilitation staff report that the cub is eating well and able to move around the limited space, but she does not appear to be placing full weight on her recently-repaired right forelimb.

The cub will remain in the connecting chute of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure for another six to eight weeks while staff continue to monitor the bear’s progress.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: October 22, 2018

Black Bear cub #18-2926 recovered from Friday’s surgery well. The bear is eating well and getting to see and smell her neighbor, bear cub #18-2921.

Cub #18-2926 will need to be cage-rested for eight weeks to fully allow her fracture to heal. At that point, the veterinary team will take radiographs to check on the bear’s elbow. She’s currently on a course of antibiotics to treat an open wound over the fracture.

On October 14, a female Black Bear cub was found on the side of the road in Botetourt County, likely after being hit by a car. The cub was brought to a nearby wildlife rehabilitation center for stabilization before she could be transferred to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: October 19, 2018

Dr. Karra and veterinary technician intern Jess took Black Bear cub #18-2926 to Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates on the morning of October 19 for surgery. Dr. Padron was able to successfully stabilize the bear’s fractured elbow; he was pleased with the outcome and the bear recovered well from anesthesia.

The bear will be placed in the small connecting chute between the two halves of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; this will give the bear limited space so that her elbow can heal in the coming weeks.

Black Bear #18-2983 [Red/White Tags]

On October 28, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub. The young bear was found in Winchester and was seen in someone’s yard eating cat food; the bear appeared small and thin and had wounds on its head and leg. Animal control officers were able to trap the bear; a biologist with the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries picked up the female cub and transported her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 3, 2019

Black Bear cub #18-2983 [Red/White Tags] was darted and anesthetized on January 3 for a quick physical exam and weight check. The cub did not stay anesthetized for long, but the team was able to get a quick weight on the bear, confirming that the bear weighed 16 kg, which is large enough to move to the Black Bear Complex. The bear, along with roommate bear #18-3024 [Orange/Yellow Tags], was moved to yard #1.

On October 28, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub. The young bear was found in Winchester and was seen in someone’s yard eating cat food; the bear appeared small and thin and had wounds on its head and leg. Animal control officers were able to trap the bear; a biologist with the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries picked up the female cub and transported her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: December 4, 2018

On November 13, Black Bear cub #18-2983 [Red/White Tag] was anesthetized for an additional skin scraping to check for mange mites. The sedation and anesthesia were uneventful, and the staff were pleased to find no sign of mites on examination. The bear weighed 7.30 kg – about 2 kg more than her admission weight.

On October 28, the Wildlife Center admitted another Black Bear cub. The young bear was found in Winchester and was seen in someone’s yard eating cat food; the bear appeared small and thin and had wounds on its head and leg. Animal control officers were able to trap the bear; a biologist with the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries picked up the female cub and transported her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 2, 2018

On November 1, Dr. Karra carefully examined Black Bear cub #18-2983 prior to moving her outdoors. Dr. Karra gave us this report:

Black Bear #18-3024 [Orange/Yellow Tags]

On November 7, a male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center from Botetourt County. The cub reportedly wandered into a Kangaroo Mart store and was trapped in a storage room. Employees called Animal Control; an officer was able to capture the cub and then called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A biologist responded to the scene and transported the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 3, 2019

Black Bear cub #18-3024 [Orange/Yellow Tags] was darted and anesthetized on January 3 for a follow-up examination and weight. The rehabilitation staff requires that all cubs weigh in at 10 kg or more to be able to move to the yard, and they were unsure if the bear had yet gained enough weight.

On November 7, a male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center from Botetourt County. The cub reportedly wandered into a Kangaroo Mart store and was trapped in a storage room. Employees called Animal Control; an officer was able to capture the cub and then called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A biologist responded to the scene and transported the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: December 4, 2018

On November 15, a severe ice storm hit Waynesboro, causing power outages and multiple downed trees and limbs.  A large tree limb fell on the roof of the bear pens, damaging the roof. The following day, the staff moved Black Bear cub #18-3024 [Orange/Yellow Tag] to a zinger crate in the Center’s isolation room; the staff did not want to introduce the bear to any other bears until the cub had another skin scraping to check for mange mites.

Black Bear cub #18-2921 [Green/Orange Tags]

On October 14, a Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Shenandoah County. The bear had been seen hanging out in the same general area for about a week; a citizen noted on October 14 that the bear had blood coming from its mouth and was not moving much. A conservation police officer responded to the scene and was able to capture the injured cub and transport it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: January 3, 2019

Black Bear cub #18-2921 [Green/Orange Tags aka “jaw bear”] was moved to the transition area of yard #1 in the Black Bear Complex today. The bear was extremely difficult to dart and anesthetize, and, in the end, the team shifted the bear into a Zinger crate. The crate was transported to the Bear Complex, and the cub was put in the transition area with Black Bear #18-2926 [Pink/Orange Tags].

On October 14, a Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Shenandoah County. The bear had been seen hanging out in the same general area for about a week; a citizen noted on October 14 that the bear had blood coming from its mouth and was not moving much. A conservation police officer responded to the scene and was able to capture the injured cub and transport it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 28, 2018

On Monday, November 26, Dr. Karra anesthetized Black Bear #18-2921 for follow-up radiographs of the cub’s injured jaw. Dr. Karra reports:

“The bear was sedated in his enclosure and we then brought him down to the clinic for an examination and radiographs. The bear was hesitant to fall asleep with our drugs, but with a few doses went down uneventfully.

On October 14, a Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Shenandoah County. The bear had been seen hanging out in the same general area for about a week; a citizen noted on October 14 that the bear had blood coming from its mouth and was not moving much. A conservation police officer responded to the scene and was able to capture the injured cub and transport it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 13, 2018

On November 10, wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey noted that the external fixator (the wires and bar used to repair the bear’s jaw), were no longer on bear cub #18-2921. She notified Dr. Karra, and they decided to fast the bear so that he could be sedated the next day for evaluation.

On October 14, a Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Shenandoah County. The bear had been seen hanging out in the same general area for about a week; a citizen noted on October 14 that the bear had blood coming from its mouth and was not moving much. A conservation police officer responded to the scene and was able to capture the injured cub and transport it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: October 22, 2018

Black Bear cub #18-2921 is doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and he has a new neighbor! Following her surgery on Friday, cub #18-2926 was moved into the connecting chute of the enclosure. Cub #18-2921 is in the left half of the enclosure [a larger space]; the two bears can smell and see each other, but won’t be able to have direct access since the female cub is being cage-rested.

Cub #18-2921 has been eating well despite his “headgear” that is stabilizing his fractured jaw.

On October 14, a Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Shenandoah County. The bear had been seen hanging out in the same general area for about a week; a citizen noted on October 14 that the bear had blood coming from its mouth and was not moving much. A conservation police officer responded to the scene and was able to capture the injured cub and transport it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: October 17, 2018

On October 16, Dr. Ernesto performed surgery on Black Bear cub #18-2921’s fractured jaw. The surgery took longer than expected, and Dr. Ernesto had to adjust his plan several times to be able to successfully stabilize the jaw. In the end, Dr. Ernesto opted for an external fixator on the bear’s mandible, which should hold the bone fragments in place as the jaw starts to heal.

Black Bear cub #18-1089

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: July 3, 2018

On July 2, the veterinary team brought Black Bear cub #18-1089 into the hospital for an examination of the injured hind limb and bandage removal. The bear was sedated for the exam; Dr. Ingrid and veterinary technician intern Jenna found that the bear’s toe amputation site was clean and healing well. They decided to leave the bandage off and applied a protective silver spray to the small wound. The bear’s formerly fractured leg feels healed and stable, and the bear was cleared to be in the entire Large Mammal Isolation enclosure with the other 10 cubs.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: June 22, 2018

On Friday, June 22, the veterinary team anesthetized Black Bear cub #18-1089 for follow-up radiographs and a bandage change. The team was pleased to find that the bear’s fractured leg is healing well; the femur has healed well and is very stable, and there is a solid callus formed on the tibia. The veterinarians decided to leave the splint off and re-bandaged the cub’s healing foot.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: June 18, 2018

On June 17, the veterinary team anesthetized Black Bear cub #18-1089 for radiographs and a bandage change. The cub has been contained in a Zinger crate to limit her movement during the healing period, though the rehabilitation staff have reported that the cub has been a difficult patient, since she likes to knock over her water, which gets her bandage wet.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: June 13, 2018

On June 6, Black Bear cub #18-1089 was moved to the vestibule of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Due to the cub’s injuries and bandage, the young bear needs to remain in a Zinger crate until her leg is fully healed, but at least she is able to hear, see, and smell the other 10 cubs at the Center. Each day, the rehabilitation staff checks the bear’s bandage as they clean her crate and offer her a mush bowl twice a day. The bear is eating well and has gained weight.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: June 4, 2018

The staff reports that the bear cub #18-1089 is feisty and eating well. On June 3, Dr. Monica was able to apply a hard cast to the cub’s fractured leg. To keep the hard cast clean, it’s covered with removable vet wrap that will likely need to be changed daily as it becomes dirty. The cast will remain on for three weeks, but the staff will take radiographs every week to check on the healing progress; radiographs can be taken through the cast.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: May 28, 2018

The veterinary team has been closely monitoring Black Bear cub #18-1089’s bandage in the days since her admission. On Sunday, Dr. Monica anesthetized the cub so that she could check and clean the bear’s healing leg laceration; she also attempted fitting the cub with a custom cast. Unfortunately, the casting material didn’t set properly, so Dr. Monica replaced the bandage with a splint again, and another attempt will be made this week when new casting material comes in.

Black Bear cubs #18-1315 and 1316

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted two orphaned cubs from Amherst County – Black Bear cubs #18-1315 and #18-1316.

Latest Update: June 12, 2018

Black Bear cubs #18-1315 [Double Yellow] and #18-1316 [Double Orange] are settling in at the Wildlife Center. The rehab team has been offering the bears a juvenile bear meal, which consists of soaked dog chow, fruits, and soft vegetables, as well as a “mush bowl” (a thickened formula made for bears). The cubs are reportedly more interested in their juvenile meal rather than their mush.

Black Bear cub #18-0933

On May 18, the Wildlife Center admitted a young Black Bear cub from Smyth County. The bear was reportedly found by a young man who was hiking earlier this week; the teenager picked up the cub and took it home. After a couple of days, the family called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries because the bear was “mean”.

Latest Update: May 28, 2018

Last week, the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries biologists received word that Black Bear cub #18-0933 had been kept for a longer period of time than originally reported; the family had the cub for at least a week, not two days. During that period, the cub bit multiple people, which had to be reported to the health department.

Black Bear cubs #18-0349 and #18-0350

On Thursday, April 12, a female bear was hit and killed while crossing the road in Franklin County, Virginia. She had two cubs with her, both of which were rescued by Virginia State Police. The cubs were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center on the evening of Friday, April 13 and within a couple of hours were picked up and transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by outreach coordinator Raina.

Latest Update: April 16, 2018

The four Black Bear cubs at the Center are all settling in well – wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that all of the cubs have gained weight since their Friday admissions. Each set of sibling cubs is housed in a zinger crate, though all four cubs have been introduced to each other and have a supervised group play time at each feeding. 

The rehab team reports that Orange Tag and Green Tag are both bottle-feeding well; No Tag and Pink Tag don’t particularly care for the bottle but are very interested in their mush bowls [thickened formula and baby food].

Black Bear cubs #18-0345 & 18-0346

The 2018 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 13 – when the first two cubs of the year were admitted!

Latest Update: April 16, 2018

The four Black Bear cubs at the Center are all settling in well – wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that all of the cubs have gained weight since their Friday admissions. Each set of sibling cubs is housed in a zinger crate, though all four cubs have been introduced to each other and have a supervised group play time at each feeding. 

The rehab team reports that Orange Tag and Green Tag are both bottle-feeding well; No Tag and Pink Tag don’t particularly care for the bottle but are very interested in their mush bowls [thickened formula and baby food].

Black Bear cub #19-0050

On the afternoon of January 23, the Wildlife Center received a Black Bear cub that had been burned in a fire. Sadly, within 24 hours, the cub succumbed to her injuries and died. 

The cub was in a large wood pile on a homeowner's property in Winchester; the brush pile had been present for years and was lit on fire on the morning of January 23. An adult bear was seen running away, then someone heard crying from the burn pile and found two cubs. The cubs were quickly taken to a local veterinary clinic. 

Black Bear cubs #18-0497 & #18-0498

On April 25, two DGIF biologists responded to a bear cub call in Amherst County, Virginia. Two small cubs had been seen in a tree for more than 24 hours; the tree was beside a road with a sharp curve, and multiple people had stopped to look at the cubs. There was no sign of their mother in the area; a Conservation Police Officer recommended rescuing the cubs for both human and bear safety. One of the DGIF biologists was able to climb the tree to safely retrieve the two cubs. 

Black Bear cub #18-0383

On April 17, a man was driving home from work when he saw a young Black Bear cub sitting by the side of the road. He watched the cub for about an hour; there was no sign of the sow, but the cub kept approaching a flooded creek. After no signs of the sow, the rescuer picked up the cub and called the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries. A biologist picked up the cub, and the young bear was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia that same day.