Current Patients

Bald Eagle #21-0161

On the evening of February 16, a member of the public found a Bald Eagle on the ground in their yard in Troutville, VA. After determining the bird was unable to fly, so they contacted the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center, a permitted local wildlife hospital and rehabilitation center. One of their staff members was able to capture the eagle and bring it back to their facility later that night. On arrival, their veterinary staff examined it and discovered that it had a fracture of the ulna in its right wing.

Great Blue Heron #20-3543

On November 2, a Great Blue Heron was found tangled in fishing line that was dangling from a tree in Madison, Virginia.  An Albemarle County Animal Control officer removed the fishing line before capturing the bird and transporting it to the Center. 

Latest Update: February 20, 2021

On February 19, Great Blue Heron #20-3543 was released back into the wild at Chris Greene Lake Park in Albemarle County.  Dr. Karra made the delicate decision to approve this bird for release since its injuries are stable and healing, and she wanted to avoid further captivity-related issues.

 

On November 2, a Great Blue Heron was found tangled in fishing line that was dangling from a tree in Madison, Virginia.  An Albemarle County Animal Control officer removed the fishing line before capturing the bird and transporting it to the Center. 

Latest Update: February 18, 2021

Great Blue Herons are a notoriously challenging species to care for in captivity.  This heron has made great strides since November 2020 when it was admitted with injuries as a result of being tangled in fishing line, but the length of time required to heal has caused several captivity-related issues that are now also being managed.  The staff are very pleased that the heron continues to eat well throughout all the treatments and handling, as is not always so with patients of this species.  The staff are still hopeful that the bird may be released soon.

On November 2, a Great Blue Heron was found tangled in fishing line that was dangling from a tree in Madison, Virginia.  An Albemarle County Animal Control officer removed the fishing line before capturing the bird and transporting it to the Center. 

Latest Update: January 25, 2021

During the past week, the veterinary staff found that the Great Blue Heron’s elbow wound was not healing as hoped, and they sutured it closed on January 21.  The bird’s foot abrasions have not changed much in A3, the Center’s large flight enclosure, but the rehabilitation staff believes this could be a result of a very delicate species living temporarily in human care.

Veterinary staff have been watching the bird’s flight ability and are pleased with his progress.  The bird continues to eat well.

On November 2, a Great Blue Heron was found tangled in fishing line that was dangling from a tree in Madison, Virginia.  An Albemarle County Animal Control officer removed the fishing line before capturing the bird and transporting it to the Center. 

Latest Update: January 14, 2021

On January 10, Great Blue Heron #20-3543 was moved to A3, one of the Center’s largest flight enclosures.  Veterinary staff has been able to monitor the heron’s flight in A3, as this is one of the enclosures that has a camera.  They are pleased with the bird’s current abilities, and have noted that the bird is continuing to eat well.  This enclosure is also furnished with new perching that allows for further healing of the heron’s foot abrasions. 

On November 2, a Great Blue Heron was found tangled in fishing line that was dangling from a tree in Madison, Virginia.  An Albemarle County Animal Control officer removed the fishing line before capturing the bird and transporting it to the Center. 

Latest Update: December 30, 2020

The Great Blue Heron’s wing injury is continuing to heal, and veterinary staff is maintaining the bandage on his wing to keep the wound clean and let it close before allowing the bird to stretch out his wings.

Some minor abrasions were forming on the bird’s feet, likely caused by gaps in the rock substrate in the enclosure.  Veterinary staff were able to fill those gaps, and expect the abrasions to resolve as a result.

On November 2, a Great Blue Heron was found tangled in fishing line that was dangling from a tree in Madison, Virginia.  An Albemarle County Animal Control officer removed the fishing line before capturing the bird and transporting it to the Center. 

Latest Update: December 22, 2020

On December 17, Dr. Karra examined Great Blue Heron #20-3543 and noticed that the wound on the heron's wing was more significant than previously noted and would require surgery to repair.  On December 18, Dr.

Black Bear yearling #21-0153

On February 16, Wildlife Center President Ed Clark responded to a call about a wildlife situation in his own neighborhood -- a small, thin Black Bear yearling was reportedly sleeping on someone's porch, not moving. Ed was able to acquire a variety of safety equipment and gloves and trapped the bear yearling in a crate. 

Bald Eagle #21-0014 [ND]

On January 7, two adult Bald Eagles were found down in a field in Virginia Beach. The birds had their talons locked together, and did not fly away when approached; the birds were able to be captured and taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. One of the eagles was banded and is a well-known eagle in the community; ND hatched at the Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010, and is the younger brother to Buddy, the Wildlife Center of Virginia's Bald Eagle. Both birds were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning. 

Latest Update: February 17, 2021

The veterinary team has been monitoring and treating Bald Eagle ND's foot wound every day during the past week. Each day, the veterinarians clean the wound and carefully re-bandage the eagle's foot, while monitoring for any signs of a worsening infection. There is a small amount of discharge around the eagle's wound; the veterinarians took a sample of the discharge on February 16 so that it can be cultured at an outside laboratory to determine the best antibiotic to treat the infection. 

ND continues to eat well and is bright and alert. 

On January 7, two adult Bald Eagles were found down in a field in Virginia Beach. The birds had their talons locked together, and did not fly away when approached; the birds were able to be captured and taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. One of the eagles was banded and is a well-known eagle in the community; ND hatched at the Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010, and is the younger brother to Buddy, the Wildlife Center of Virginia's Bald Eagle. Both birds were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning. 

Latest Update: February 9, 2021

On February 4, the veterinary team moved Bald Eagle ND to a small outdoor enclosure. The eagle ate well throughout the weekend and appeared to be moving normally around the limited space. 

On January 7, two adult Bald Eagles were found down in a field in Virginia Beach. The birds had their talons locked together, and did not fly away when approached; the birds were able to be captured and taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. One of the eagles was banded and is a well-known eagle in the community; ND hatched at the Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010, and is the younger brother to Buddy, the Wildlife Center of Virginia's Bald Eagle. Both birds were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning. 

Latest Update: February 3, 2021

On February 1, Bald Eagle ND had another blood sample drawn for a lead analysis -- this time, after three rounds of chelation therapy, the results came back "low", indicating that treatment had finally removed lead from the bird's system. The veterinary team have also been keeping a close eye on ND's extensive mouth wound; it appears to be healing very well after the antibiotic beads were surgically implanted. 

On January 7, two adult Bald Eagles were found down in a field in Virginia Beach. The birds had their talons locked together, and did not fly away when approached; the birds were able to be captured and taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. One of the eagles was banded and is a well-known eagle in the community; ND hatched at the Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010, and is the younger brother to Buddy, the Wildlife Center of Virginia's Bald Eagle. Both birds were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning. 

Latest Update: January 28, 2021

Bald Eagle ND continues to recover in the Center's holding room, though is also continuing to battle lead poisoning. On January 20, the veterinary team drew blood from the bird and ran another lead analysis; results came back at 0.03 ppm. This was a reduced level of lead in the bird's body from the sample that was run the week before, though the veterinary staff decided to provide another five-day course of oral chelation therapy. 

On January 7, two adult Bald Eagles were found down in a field in Virginia Beach. The birds had their talons locked together, and did not fly away when approached; the birds were able to be captured and taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. One of the eagles was banded and is a well-known eagle in the community; ND hatched at the Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010, and is the younger brother to Buddy, the Wildlife Center of Virginia's Bald Eagle. Both birds were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning. 

Latest Update: January 18, 2021

Bald Eagle #21-0014 [ND] has been healing slowly in the Center's holding room. On January 14, ND had another lead analysis run; results came back at a reduced level from ND's initial reading, indicating that while the first course of chelation therapy helped, ND still had lead in his system. The veterinary team started a second course of chelation therapy the following day. Another lead recheck will be performed on January 20. 

On January 7, two adult Bald Eagles were found down in a field in Virginia Beach. The birds had their talons locked together, and did not fly away when approached; the birds were able to be captured and taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator. One of the eagles was banded and is a well-known eagle in the community; ND hatched at the Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010, and is the younger brother to Buddy, the Wildlife Center of Virginia's Bald Eagle. Both birds were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning. 

Latest Update: January 11, 2021

Bald Eagle ND has been stable in the first few days following his admission and treatment. While it will likely take some time for the many serious puncture wounds and lacerations to heal, the veterinary team is encouraged that the eagle's wounds are clean and starting to heal, particularly around the bird's face and neck.  The eagle will finish his first course of chelation therapy on January 13; another lead test will be run the following day. 

Black Bear cub #20-3609

On Friday, November 20, a private citizen observed an underweight, weak Black Bear cub in Greene County. The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources placed a humane trap in the area, successfully capturing the bear on Saturday, November 21. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia that same day.

Latest Update: February 12, 2021

On February 9, the veterinary team anesthetized Black Bear #20-3609 and #20-3590 for evaluation and moving. 

On Friday, November 20, a private citizen observed an underweight, weak Black Bear cub in Greene County. The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources placed a humane trap in the area, successfully capturing the bear on Saturday, November 21. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia that same day.

Latest Update: January 18, 2021

Black Bear #20-3609 has been continuing to slowly heal in the Center's Bear Pens. The bear has been on an extended course of antibiotics and anti-inflammatories since the veterinary team noted improvement with the bear's eye; the course of medication will end on January 27. The team will assess the bear at that point and determine if he is ready to move to the Bear Complex, or if further treatment is needed. 

On Friday, November 20, a private citizen observed an underweight, weak Black Bear cub in Greene County. The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources placed a humane trap in the area, successfully capturing the bear on Saturday, November 21. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia that same day.

Latest Update: January 5, 2021

On January 2, the veterinary team took Black Bear #20-3609 to a local veterinary clinic -- Augusta Valley Animal Hospital -- for dental radiographs. 

On Friday, November 20, a private citizen observed an underweight, weak Black Bear cub in Greene County. The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources placed a humane trap in the area, successfully capturing the bear on Saturday, November 21. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia that same day.

Latest Update: December 30, 2020

On December 27, the rehabilitation team noted that Black Bear #20-3609 had a swollen left eye. The following day, the veterinary team darted and anesthetized the cub for an examination. 

On Friday, November 20, a private citizen observed an underweight, weak Black Bear cub in Greene County. The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources placed a humane trap in the area, successfully capturing the bear on Saturday, November 21. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia that same day.

Latest Update: December 14, 2020

On December 10, the veterinary team sedated and evaluated Black Bear #20-3609. Dr. Sarah reported that the bear was still thin and had crusty skin, though the bear's paw pads were much improved since admission. A skin scraping was clean, indicating no mange mites still present on the bear. Blood work was also much improved since the bear's admission. 

On Friday, November 20, a private citizen observed an underweight, weak Black Bear cub in Greene County. The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources placed a humane trap in the area, successfully capturing the bear on Saturday, November 21. The cub was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia that same day.

Latest Update: December 1, 2020

Black Bear cubs #20-3590 and #20-3609 have been quietly recovering in two of the Center's Bear Pens. The bears are eating well, and typically receive about six to eight pounds of food a day. During the week of December 7, the veterinary team will plan to sedate both cubs (on two separate dates) to perform follow-up skin scrapings. If both bears test negative for mange mites, they will be moved into adjoining bear pens so that they can have a "nose to nose" introduction.

Black Bear cub #20-3590

On the evening of November 15, a Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bear was found stumbling in the middle of a road in Nelson County, before collapsing on the road. The bear's rescuer picked it up and put it in the trunk of his car and took it to the Rockfish Wildlife Sanctuary. The bear was transferred to the Wildlife Center that same day. 

Latest Update: February 12, 2021

On February 9, the veterinary team anesthetized Black Bear #20-3609 and #20-3590 for evaluation and moving. 

On the evening of November 15, a Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bear was found stumbling in the middle of a road in Nelson County, before collapsing on the road. The bear's rescuer picked it up and put it in the trunk of his car and took it to the Rockfish Wildlife Sanctuary. The bear was transferred to the Wildlife Center that same day. 

Latest Update: December 10, 2020

On December 9, the veterinary team sedated and evaluated Black Bear #20-3590. Dr. Karra reported that the bear was still thin, though the cub had gained weight since admission and currently weighs 10.1 kg. A skin scraping was negative for live sarcoptes mites; three dead mites were found, indicating that mange treatment is working well. The bear will continue to live in the Center's Bear Pens for the next two weeks until another skin scraping is performed. At that time, the staff will consider moving the bear to yard #1 in the Black Bear Complex. 

On the evening of November 15, a Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bear was found stumbling in the middle of a road in Nelson County, before collapsing on the road. The bear's rescuer picked it up and put it in the trunk of his car and took it to the Rockfish Wildlife Sanctuary. The bear was transferred to the Wildlife Center that same day. 

Latest Update: December 1, 2020

Black Bear cubs #20-3590 and #20-3609 have been quietly recovering in two of the Center's Bear Pens. The bears are eating well, and typically receive about six to eight pounds of food a day. During the week of December 7, the veterinary team will plan to sedate both cubs (on two separate dates) to perform follow-up skin scrapings. If both bears test negative for mange mites, they will be moved into adjoining bear pens so that they can have a "nose to nose" introduction.

Bald Eagle #20-3608

On November 20, an officer with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service discovered an injured Bald Eagle in the woods in Accomack County. The eagle was captured by a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, and taken to an animal hospital for radiographs, which revealed a closed left humeral fracture. 

Latest Update: February 9, 2021

During the past month, Bald Eagle #20-3680 has been showing solid signs of recovery. 

On November 20, an officer with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service discovered an injured Bald Eagle in the woods in Accomack County. The eagle was captured by a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, and taken to an animal hospital for radiographs, which revealed a closed left humeral fracture. 

Latest Update: December 31, 2020

Over the past few weeks, Bald Eagle #20-3608 has been brighter and more alert and eating well. 

The Veterinary staff had been doing physical therapy with this bird in the weeks following her surgery, and her wing has gained greater range of motion as a result.  Unfortunately, vet staff noticed that this bird developed a small wound near the pin site on her wing.  Vet staff is cleaning the wound daily, and has begun to wrap the bird’s wing to ensure this wound heals in a clean environment.

On November 20, an officer with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service discovered an injured Bald Eagle in the woods in Accomack County. The eagle was captured by a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator, and taken to an animal hospital for radiographs, which revealed a closed left humeral fracture. 

Latest Update: December 11, 2020

In the two weeks following Bald Eagle #20-3608's surgery, the eagle has been quietly healing in the Center's holding room. The eagle continues to eat well and gain weight, although veterinary staff have noted that this bird dislikes fish heads.  Dr. Cam, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, reports that the pin sites on the bird’s wing look good, and he is pleased with the animal’s progress.

Dr. Cam hopes to remove the pins on December 14 and begin physical therapy and laser therapy the following day.

Black Bear cub #20-1694

On June 12, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Rockbridge County. The bear had been seen wandering around a barn for several days with no sign of a sow; the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted and the decision was made to rescue the bear cub and bring him to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: January 28, 2021

Black Bear #20-1694 has made a full recovery, and was successfully transitioned back into the Black Bear Complex on January 26. The rehabilitation staff report that he readily moved into the larger area, and was seen climbing a large tree soon after. While he appears to have preferred spending time away from the other bears in the Complex during the past few days, his behavior and physical condition is considered normal by the veterinary and rehabilitation staff.

On June 12, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Rockbridge County. The bear had been seen wandering around a barn for several days with no sign of a sow; the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted and the decision was made to rescue the bear cub and bring him to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: January 19, 2021

After five days of close observation, the veterinary team determined that Black Bear #20-1694 was ready to begin the gradual transition from Large Mammal Isolation back into the larger Black Bear Complex. After sedating the bear, the Center's rehabilitation team transported it to Complex Transition Yard 2 on the afternoon of January 19. In this small area, the bear will be able to see, hear and smell the other bears in a safely partitioned area before fully reacclimating to a larger space.

On June 12, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Rockbridge County. The bear had been seen wandering around a barn for several days with no sign of a sow; the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted and the decision was made to rescue the bear cub and bring him to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: January 14, 2021

Black Bear #20-1694 continues to heal in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Each day, the rehabilitation staff carefully check to ensure that the bear's rectal prolapse has not recurred and that the bear is able to defecate normally. At the end of last week, the bear finished a course of stool softeners; the team wants to ensure that everything remains normal for several days before they consider moving the bear back to the Bear Complex.

On June 12, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Rockbridge County. The bear had been seen wandering around a barn for several days with no sign of a sow; the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted and the decision was made to rescue the bear cub and bring him to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: January 5, 2021

On January 4, Black Bear #20-1694 was sedated for an examination. The sutures that have been in place for the past 11 days were removed, and Dr. Cam notes that everything looks within normal limits. Another fecal sample was collected which was parasite-free. The veterinary team will keep the Black Bear in the Large Mammal enclosure for several more days to monitor and ensure that the rectal prolapse doesn't occur again. If all continues to go well, the bear will be moved back to the Black Bear Complex. 

On June 12, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Rockbridge County. The bear had been seen wandering around a barn for several days with no sign of a sow; the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted and the decision was made to rescue the bear cub and bring him to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: December 29, 2020

Double Orange Tags has been recovering in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure after his surgery on Christmas Eve. Each day, the staff check the bear to ensure his sutures are intact, and to monitor for any redness or swelling. The bear is receiving a course of stool thinners to help ease the passage of his meals as he continues to heal. A fecal examination over the weekend did not reveal any parasites. 

Since the bear was in-hand during darting and during his medical procedure, the veterinary team was able to weigh the bear cub; he weighed in at a hefty 30 kg! 

On June 12, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Rockbridge County. The bear had been seen wandering around a barn for several days with no sign of a sow; the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted and the decision was made to rescue the bear cub and bring him to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: December 24, 2020

After many hours staking out Double Orange Tags from the Black Bear Complex tower, Dr. Karra was able to dart and sedate the injured cub. The team confirmed that the bear did have a rectal prolapse, which was able to be cleaned and treated. The cub will live in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure during treatment for the next few weeks. 

On June 12, a male Black Bear cub was admitted from Rockbridge County. The bear had been seen wandering around a barn for several days with no sign of a sow; the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was contacted and the decision was made to rescue the bear cub and bring him to the Wildlife Center. 

Latest Update: December 24, 2020

On the morning of December 23, Critter Cam viewers noticed that one of the Black Bears, Double Orange Tags, had an issue with his hind end; the veterinary team closely scrutinized the bear on camera and decided to try to trap and dart the bear for an examination. It appeared as though the bear has a rectal prolapse; this issue is not common though the Center staff did see this issue in 2016 with two bear cubs. Typically, prolapses can occur from prolonged straining [constipation or diarrhea], parasites, or a congenital issue.

Black Bear cubs of 2020

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: January 18, 2021

On January 18, the bear cubs of 2020 celebrated a very special event -- their collective birthdays! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: December 29, 2020

Double Orange Tags has been recovering in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure after his surgery on Christmas Eve. Each day, the staff check the bear to ensure his sutures are intact, and to monitor for any redness or swelling. The bear is receiving a course of stool thinners to help ease the passage of his meals as he continues to heal. A fecal examination over the weekend did not reveal any parasites. 

Since the bear was in-hand during darting and during his medical procedure, the veterinary team was able to weigh the bear cub; he weighed in at a hefty 30 kg! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: December 24, 2020

After many hours staking out Double Orange Tags from the Black Bear Complex tower, Dr. Karra was able to dart and sedate the injured cub. The team confirmed that the bear did have a rectal prolapse, which was able to be cleaned and treated. The cub will live in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure during treatment for the next few weeks. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: December 24, 2020

On the morning of December 23, Critter Cam viewers noticed that one of the Black Bears, Double Orange Tags, had an issue with his hind end; the veterinary team closely scrutinized the bear on camera and decided to try to trap and dart the bear for an examination. It appeared as though the bear has a rectal prolapse; this issue is not common though the Center staff did see this issue in 2016 with two bear cubs. Typically, prolapses can occur from prolonged straining [constipation or diarrhea], parasites, or a congenital issue.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: September 9, 2020

On September 8, Black Bear cubs #20-0965 (White/Green Tags) and #20-0967 (Yellow/Pink Tags) were moved to the Black Bear Complex. According to wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey, "Initially, they were put in transition yard #2, but when they were fully awake, the gates were opened and they were immediately integrated with their anxiously-awaiting 17 'siblings'. Darting was successful with no hiccups and the two bears are healthy. White/Green Tags weighed 25.1kg and Yellow/Pink Tags weighed 21.2kg … they are significantly larger than they were a month and a half ago."

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: September 2, 2020

The two Black Bear cubs that have been in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure during the past few weeks are doing well and are ready to move to the Black Bear Complex! The veterinary team plans on moving the two cubs during the week of September 7. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: July 30, 2020

Early on the morning of July 30, the veterinary team moved Black Bear #20-1808 to the Black Bear Complex. The bear was sedated first and tagged with yellow and orange ear tags for identification purposes. The cub recovered well in a transition area and then was allowed full access to the two yards. 

Black Bear cubs Yellow/Pink and Green/White Tags will remain in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure a little longer, just so they can put on additional weight before moving to the yard again. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: July 22, 2020

On the afternoon of July 21, the Center staff discovered that four Black Bear cubs had escaped out of the yards. Two cubs, Yellow Tag and White Tag, were within the perimeter fence. Two other cubs, Yellow/Pink Tags and Green White Tags, had escaped the entire Black Bear Complex and were near the building. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: July 15, 2020

On July 14, the veterinarians and rehabilitators moved six cubs from the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure to the Black Bear Complex. The cubs, along with the cubs already in the Complex, have access to both yards #2 and #3. 

Kelsey reports that there were, "no issues, everyone is perfect and fat and plump and cute and perfect."

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 30, 2020

On the morning of June 30, Drs. Karra and Sarah and rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon were able to move three Black Bear cubs from the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure to the transition area of yard #2 in the Black Bear Complex. Kelsey reports: 

"We moved three bears to transition yard #2 today, and will open up the gate so they can have free access to bear yard #2 later today. As soon as everyone is settled, probably tomorrow, we will open the gate between BY2 and BY3 so all of the bears can mingle.

"Bears moved:

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 17, 2020

The Black Bear cubs of 2020 are all doing well -- the nine cubs currently in the Black Bear Complex are exploring, climbing trees, and generally seem to be enjoying their new space. At this point, all nine cubs are in Bear Yard #3; the Center needs to make a few repairs to a gate in yard #2 before the cubs can have access to that area, since they've proven to the rehabilitation staff that they can slip through an opening in the gate. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 11, 2020

On June 10, rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon weighed many of the Black Bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation  (LMI) enclosure. Several were more than 10 kg -- meaning that they could move to the Black Bear Complex! Cub #20-0106 [Double Pink Tag] -- a cub admitted at the end of February -- weighed in at 10.4 kg. The team re-ear-tagged the bear, since she had lost her tags at one point, and went ahead and moved her to the Bear Complex in yard #3. 

Five other bears were also ready to move -- and will be moved on Thursday, June 11 to yard #3. The cubs include: 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: June 3, 2020

Last week, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon separated the remaining 14 bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, with the goal of keeping the smallest cubs away from the larger cubs. Based on weights and behavior, the current split includes: 

The littles: (housed in the left side of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure) 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 26, 2020

The Wildlife Center staff are deeply saddened to report that Black Bear cub #20-0833 [Double Orange Tags] died on May 26. The bear appeared to be sleeping on the ground, though when other cubs moved the cub, it became clear that something was not quite right. Rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon quickly went to check on the situation and found Double Orange, deceased. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 25, 2020

Three of the 18 Black Bear cubs have been successfully moved to the Black Bear Complex! On Monday, May 25, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon moved Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag to the transition area of yard #2. Kelsey said that when the bears were introduced to this new space, they briefly sniffed the air, then noticed their grapes (always a favorite treat) in their food pile, and promptly started eating.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 19, 2020

With 17 Black Bear cubs in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, the rehabilitation staff have their hands full trying to manage and feed this "sloth" of bear cubs! In general, the cubs are doing well and the staff are careful to monitor feeding times to ensure that the smaller cubs are getting their portion of formula. During the past weekend, the staff decided to separate the larger three cubs -- Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag -- into the left side of the Large Mammal enclosure.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: May 8, 2020

The Black Bear cubs in the Large Mammal enclosure have been doing well in the past week. On Thursday, wildlife rehabilitators Kelsey and Shannon got their intense workout of the week when they weighed all 13 cubs! All of the cubs except two gained weight; Double Green lost a small amount of weight, and Double White was static in weight. These two cubs will be weighed again on Monday. The largest of the bunch, Yellow Tag, weighed in at 11.6 kg! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 28, 2020

All of the cubs at the Center are doing well - all 12 of them are out and about in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. It takes quite a bit of formula to keep 12 bear cubs happy -- but fortunately due to a recent flash fundraiser on the Critter Cam moderated discussion, the rehabilitation staff have been able to buy plenty of specialized bear formula for this growing group. 

The cubs currently eat this much -- twice a day! 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 23, 2020

On the night of April 22, Dr. Karra emailed an update on Double Pink Tag -- who had been intermittently quiet and lethargic this week: 

"I know there have been lots of people wanting an update on our Black Bear cub #20-0106, since she was reported to be lethargic and have some GI signs on Sunday night … so here it is! Rehab reported her lethargy to wax and wane the last few days, so we decided to bring her down to the clinic for a full assessment under anesthesia today.

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 21, 2020

The eight Black Bear cubs are getting big! The older/larger three (Yellow Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag) in particular are getting to be a handful for the rehabilitation staff. Fortunately, a kind supporter sent four pairs of overalls to keep the staff protected from tiny bear paws with very long claws!  

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: April 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center's Large Mammal enclosure -- all are eating well and gaining weight quickly! 

#20-0106 (female) No Tag: 3.5 kg
#20-0107 (male) Yellow Tag: 6.9 kg
#20-0108 (female) White Tag: 4.2 kg
#20-0109 (male) Orange Tag: 4.8 kg

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 30, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are settling in well to their new playground in the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure! The cubs are being bottle-fed multiple times a day and are also receiving "mush bowls" - bowls of soft veggies, fruits, and dog food covered in a thickened bear formula. The three larger cubs are bottle-fed twice a day, and the youngest cub [No Tag] is bottle-fed three times a day. 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 25, 2020

The Black Bear cubs are doing well and gaining weight: 

#20-0106 (female) No Tag: 2.46 kg 
#20-0107 (male) Yellow Tag: 5.05 kg
#20-0108 (female) White Tag: 3.85 kg 
#20-0109 (male) Orange Tag: 4.30 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

In early 2020, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. This year, the Center admitted an unusually high number of infant cubs; between late January and mid-February, seven Black Bear cubs were admitted. These infants ranged from two- to four-weeks-old at admission.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Black Bear cub #20-1808

On June 18, a young female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center from Shenandoah County. The cub was reportedly hit by a vehicle on June 16; a rescuer saw the cub and brought the young bear into her house before calling the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. A DGIF officer retrieved the cub the following day and brought the bear to the Center on June 18. 

Black Bear cub #20-1118

On May 20, a male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Center from Warren County, Virginia. The cub had been seen in the area for about a week with no sign of a mother bear; the cub was trapped and DGIF transported the young bear to the Wildlife Center. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0965, 0966, and 0967

On May 13, three more Black Bear cubs arrived at the Wildlife Center of Virginia! The cubs were found in Luray on May 12; the finder heard the cubs crying in a field behind a house. The bears were gathered and placed in a box for the night outside to see if the mother bear would come back for them, but sadly there was no sign of the sow by the next morning. DGIF instructed the finder to bring the cubs to the Wildlife Center. 

Black Bear cub #20-0698

On April 28, another Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center -- taking the current cub count up to 13! The female cub was found alone and crying in Dickenson County on April 24; a private citizen took the cub home and fed it evaporated milk throughout the weekend. On Monday, April 27, the cub was taken first to a local veterinary clinic and then transferred to Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0646 and #20-0647

On the morning of April 25, the Wildlife Center admitted two more Black Bear cubs -- bringing the current cub tally to 12. These two cubs were found in Bath County; a private citizen saw the two young bears without a sow on April 19. On April 24, he saw them again and called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who responded to the call. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0589 and #20-0590

On April 21, two Black Bear cubs were admitted to the Wildlife Center from Prince Edward County. The two cubs were seen in a cow pasture on the morning of April 20; there was no sign of a sow for about 16 hours. When the DGIF biologists responded to the scene, one cub was in a tree, and the other was curled up in a ditch by the road. There were reports of an adult Black Bear sow in the area hit by a vehicle last week, though biologists were never able to locate the bear; they suspect that the incident causes these cubs to be orphaned. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0468, #20-0469, and #20-0470

At about 9:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 11, a Black Bear sow was hit and killed by a truck on I-64 in Rockbridge County. There were three cubs with her,  and the trucker called the state police. The cubs climbed about 50-60 feet up a nearby tree. 

Black Bear cub #20-0384

On Tuesday, April 7, another Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The tiny female cub was found alone in Buchanan County on April 6 and was taken to a local veterinary clinic before she spent the night at the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke. 

Black Bear cubs #20-0107, 20-0108, and 20-0109

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Black Bear cubs #20-0105 & #20-0106

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: March 19, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs at the Wildlife Center are doing well and growing quickly! The cubs are currently being bottle-fed and are also starting to eat food out of a bowl; they also have supervised play sessions in their sheltered outdoor space. Before the cubs were moved to this area, the rehabilitation staff took a few video clips, which we compiled here: 

 

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: March 9, 2020

The four Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; the rehabilitation staff have been bottle-feeding the cubs a specialized bear cub formula three times a day, and each cub is gaining weight. As of March 9:

#20-0106: (female): 1.4 kg

#20-0107: (male): 2.74 kg

#20-0108: (female): 2.24 kg

#20-0109: ("orange" male): 2.50 kg 

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: February 27, 2020

VDGIF biologists reported back on February 26 with news of a partially successful fostering attempt!

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

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