Current Patients

Black Bear #18-2293

On August 1, an adult female Black Bear was trapped in Rappahannock County; the bear had severe signs of mange, including significant hair loss.  The bear was transported to the Center and sedated for an examination with Drs. Peach and Karra.

Latest Update: September 18, 2018

Black Bear #18-2293 has been improving since her treatment with antibiotics; the rehab staff report that the bear is eating well and has appeared brighter in recent weeks.

On Thursday, September 20, the bear will be darted and sedated for an additional physical exam, skin scraping, and follow-up blood work. As long as her skin scrape is negative and she is continuing to improve, she’ll be moved to yard #3 in the Center’s Black Bear Complex.

On August 1, an adult female Black Bear was trapped in Rappahannock County; the bear had severe signs of mange, including significant hair loss.  The bear was transported to the Center and sedated for an examination with Drs. Peach and Karra.

Latest Update: September 4, 2018

On September 3, Black Bear #18-2293 was sedated and anesthetized for a follow-up examination. Dr. Peach performed a physical exam and found that the bear was still thin and had not gained additional weight since her last examination. The bear’s skin and coat were both improved though, with some of the crusting on the bear’s flanks and ears starting to fall off. Skin scrapings revealed only three dead mange mites, indicating that the medication is killing off the parasites.

On August 1, an adult female Black Bear was trapped in Rappahannock County; the bear had severe signs of mange, including significant hair loss.  The bear was transported to the Center and sedated for an examination with Drs. Peach and Karra.

Latest Update: August 17, 2018

On August 17, Dr. Peach darted and anesthetized Black Bear #18-2293 for a follow-up examination. It’s been two weeks since the rehab staff provided the bear with her oral medication for treating mange.  The staff served the bear the meds in a small dish of food initially, but the bear knocked the bowl upside down, and the staff was unsure if the medication and food had been consumed.

On August 1, an adult female Black Bear was trapped in Rappahannock County; the bear had severe signs of mange, including significant hair loss.  The bear was transported to the Center and sedated for an examination with Drs. Peach and Karra.

Latest Update: August 7, 2018

Black Bear #18-2293 has been doing well since her admission; the bear has been quiet, and is often sleeping when the rehabilitation staff checks on her. The bear ate her oral mange medication in a piece of food last week and has generally been eating well.

Great Horned Owlet #18-0553

On April 23, a young Great Horned Owl was found down on the ground in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. The bird was taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who transferred the young owl to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 28.

Latest Update: September 18, 2018

The four Great Horned Owlets have been doing well in A2 this summer. While the owls haven’t been in a “formal” exercise regimen, they have been active and flying in their large space. Now that fall is approaching, the owlets will be split up for additional exercise and live prey testing, to ensure that each young bird can successfully catch and kill its own food.

On April 23, a young Great Horned Owl was found down on the ground in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. The bird was taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who transferred the young owl to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 28.

Latest Update: July 16, 2018

The four owlets are doing well with Papa G’Ho in flight pen A2. The birds can often be seen interacting with each other on Critter Cam; they often preen each other in between their naps. The birds haven’t started a formal exercise program yet since they won’t be released until the fall, but the rehab staff has started offering “practice mouse school” on Sundays. Several live mice are left in a large tub in the flight pen in addition to the owlet’s regular meal of dead mice and rats.

On April 23, a young Great Horned Owl was found down on the ground in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. The bird was taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator, who transferred the young owl to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 28.

Latest Update: May 17, 2018

The Great Horned Owlets have been doing well during the past few weeks; they have all gained weight and are growing in all of their adult flight feathers. The owls are becoming increasingly active, and on May 17 or 18 they will be moved to flight pen A2. This larger space will allow the four owlets to have more room as they start to fly more. Later this summer, the rehab staff will start exercising the owlets daily. The owlets won't be old enough for release until the fall. 

Great Horned Owlet #18-0408

On April 19, Great Horned Owlet #18-0408 was admitted to the Wildlife Center from a group of permitted wildlife rehabilitators in the Richmond area. The young bird had been found on the ground in Chesterfield County on April 14; the owlet’s nest could not be found and it was not possible to reunite the young owlet was its parents.

Latest Update: September 18, 2018

The four Great Horned Owlets have been doing well in A2 this summer. While the owls haven’t been in a “formal” exercise regimen, they have been active and flying in their large space. Now that fall is approaching, the owlets will be split up for additional exercise and live prey testing, to ensure that each young bird can successfully catch and kill its own food.

On April 19, Great Horned Owlet #18-0408 was admitted to the Wildlife Center from a group of permitted wildlife rehabilitators in the Richmond area. The young bird had been found on the ground in Chesterfield County on April 14; the owlet’s nest could not be found and it was not possible to reunite the young owlet was its parents.

Latest Update: July 16, 2018

The four owlets are doing well with Papa G’Ho in flight pen A2. The birds can often be seen interacting with each other on Critter Cam; they often preen each other in between their naps. The birds haven’t started a formal exercise program yet since they won’t be released until the fall, but the rehab staff has started offering “practice mouse school” on Sundays. Several live mice are left in a large tub in the flight pen in addition to the owlet’s regular meal of dead mice and rats.

On April 19, Great Horned Owlet #18-0408 was admitted to the Wildlife Center from a group of permitted wildlife rehabilitators in the Richmond area. The young bird had been found on the ground in Chesterfield County on April 14; the owlet’s nest could not be found and it was not possible to reunite the young owlet was its parents.

Latest Update: May 17, 2018

The Great Horned Owlets have been doing well during the past few weeks; they have all gained weight and are growing in all of their adult flight feathers. The owls are becoming increasingly active, and on May 17 or 18 they will be moved to flight pen A2. This larger space will allow the four owlets to have more room as they start to fly more. Later this summer, the rehab staff will start exercising the owlets daily. The owlets won't be old enough for release until the fall. 

On April 19, Great Horned Owlet #18-0408 was admitted to the Wildlife Center from a group of permitted wildlife rehabilitators in the Richmond area. The young bird had been found on the ground in Chesterfield County on April 14; the owlet’s nest could not be found and it was not possible to reunite the young owlet was its parents.

Latest Update: April 24, 2018

The Great Horned Owl family is doing well in Flight Pen 4; on Saturday, the oldest Great Horned Owlet [#18-0299] was let out of its crate. On Monday, April 23, the other two owlets came out of their crate. All three are exploring, making short flights, and are eating well. The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together; the bands will be removed this fall and replaced with permanent metal U.S. Fish & Wildlife bands prior to their release.

Great Horned Owlet #18-0299

In early March, a Great Horned Owlet was blown out of its nest in Fauquier County, Virginia. Homeowners found the baby, along with its deceased sibling, and took the young bird to a wildlife rehabilitator. The bird was placed with a non-releasable surrogate Great Horned Owl about a week later and was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 10.

Latest Update: September 18, 2018

The four Great Horned Owlets have been doing well in A2 this summer. While the owls haven’t been in a “formal” exercise regimen, they have been active and flying in their large space. Now that fall is approaching, the owlets will be split up for additional exercise and live prey testing, to ensure that each young bird can successfully catch and kill its own food.

In early March, a Great Horned Owlet was blown out of its nest in Fauquier County, Virginia. Homeowners found the baby, along with its deceased sibling, and took the young bird to a wildlife rehabilitator. The bird was placed with a non-releasable surrogate Great Horned Owl about a week later and was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 10.

Latest Update: July 16, 2018

The four owlets are doing well with Papa G’Ho in flight pen A2. The birds can often be seen interacting with each other on Critter Cam; they often preen each other in between their naps. The birds haven’t started a formal exercise program yet since they won’t be released until the fall, but the rehab staff has started offering “practice mouse school” on Sundays. Several live mice are left in a large tub in the flight pen in addition to the owlet’s regular meal of dead mice and rats.

In early March, a Great Horned Owlet was blown out of its nest in Fauquier County, Virginia. Homeowners found the baby, along with its deceased sibling, and took the young bird to a wildlife rehabilitator. The bird was placed with a non-releasable surrogate Great Horned Owl about a week later and was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 10.

Latest Update: May 17, 2018

The Great Horned Owlets have been doing well during the past few weeks; they have all gained weight and are growing in all of their adult flight feathers. The owls are becoming increasingly active, and on May 17 or 18 they will be moved to flight pen A2. This larger space will allow the four owlets to have more room as they start to fly more. Later this summer, the rehab staff will start exercising the owlets daily. The owlets won't be old enough for release until the fall. 

In early March, a Great Horned Owlet was blown out of its nest in Fauquier County, Virginia. Homeowners found the baby, along with its deceased sibling, and took the young bird to a wildlife rehabilitator. The bird was placed with a non-releasable surrogate Great Horned Owl about a week later and was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 10.

Latest Update: April 24, 2018

The Great Horned Owl family is doing well in Flight Pen 4; on Saturday, the oldest Great Horned Owlet [#18-0299] was let out of its crate. On Monday, April 23, the other two owlets came out of their crate. All three are exploring, making short flights, and are eating well. The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together; the bands will be removed this fall and replaced with permanent metal U.S. Fish & Wildlife bands prior to their release.

In early March, a Great Horned Owlet was blown out of its nest in Fauquier County, Virginia. Homeowners found the baby, along with its deceased sibling, and took the young bird to a wildlife rehabilitator. The bird was placed with a non-releasable surrogate Great Horned Owl about a week later and was transferred to the Wildlife Center of Virginia on April 10.

Latest Update: April 16, 2018

Great Horned Owlets #18-0210 and 18-0299 are both doing well; they are now eating whole food [dead mice] twice a day and have both gained weight.  The rehab team reports that Papa G’Ho is getting more defensive of the babies, and has flown at the staff when the owlets were handled for weighing.

Waynesboro is still experiencing some cold springtime temperatures; the two owlets will come inside during the next couple of nights when temperatures are forecasted to reach the lower 30’s. The owlets [still in their crate] will be returned to Papa’s flight pen during the day.

Great Horned Owlet #18-0210

On March 27, a homeowner in Augusta County found a young Great Horned Owl in the front yard. The rescuer was unsure if the owl was injured or orphaned, so picked it up and brought it to the Wildlife Center for an examination.

The veterinary team found a few flat flies on the young owl, but otherwise, the bird was healthy. The front-desk staff called the homeowners to see if they could locate the owlet’s nest on their property, but they did not see a nest. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie visited the property to look as well, but there was no sign of any Great Horned Owls.

Latest Update: September 18, 2018

The four Great Horned Owlets have been doing well in A2 this summer. While the owls haven’t been in a “formal” exercise regimen, they have been active and flying in their large space. Now that fall is approaching, the owlets will be split up for additional exercise and live prey testing, to ensure that each young bird can successfully catch and kill its own food.

On March 27, a homeowner in Augusta County found a young Great Horned Owl in the front yard. The rescuer was unsure if the owl was injured or orphaned, so picked it up and brought it to the Wildlife Center for an examination.

The veterinary team found a few flat flies on the young owl, but otherwise, the bird was healthy. The front-desk staff called the homeowners to see if they could locate the owlet’s nest on their property, but they did not see a nest. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie visited the property to look as well, but there was no sign of any Great Horned Owls.

Latest Update: July 16, 2018

The four owlets are doing well with Papa G’Ho in flight pen A2. The birds can often be seen interacting with each other on Critter Cam; they often preen each other in between their naps. The birds haven’t started a formal exercise program yet since they won’t be released until the fall, but the rehab staff has started offering “practice mouse school” on Sundays. Several live mice are left in a large tub in the flight pen in addition to the owlet’s regular meal of dead mice and rats.

On March 27, a homeowner in Augusta County found a young Great Horned Owl in the front yard. The rescuer was unsure if the owl was injured or orphaned, so picked it up and brought it to the Wildlife Center for an examination.

The veterinary team found a few flat flies on the young owl, but otherwise, the bird was healthy. The front-desk staff called the homeowners to see if they could locate the owlet’s nest on their property, but they did not see a nest. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie visited the property to look as well, but there was no sign of any Great Horned Owls.

Latest Update: May 17, 2018

The Great Horned Owlets have been doing well during the past few weeks; they have all gained weight and are growing in all of their adult flight feathers. The owls are becoming increasingly active, and on May 17 or 18 they will be moved to flight pen A2. This larger space will allow the four owlets to have more room as they start to fly more. Later this summer, the rehab staff will start exercising the owlets daily. The owlets won't be old enough for release until the fall. 

On March 27, a homeowner in Augusta County found a young Great Horned Owl in the front yard. The rescuer was unsure if the owl was injured or orphaned, so picked it up and brought it to the Wildlife Center for an examination.

The veterinary team found a few flat flies on the young owl, but otherwise, the bird was healthy. The front-desk staff called the homeowners to see if they could locate the owlet’s nest on their property, but they did not see a nest. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie visited the property to look as well, but there was no sign of any Great Horned Owls.

Latest Update: April 24, 2018

The Great Horned Owl family is doing well in Flight Pen 4; on Saturday, the oldest Great Horned Owlet [#18-0299] was let out of its crate. On Monday, April 23, the other two owlets came out of their crate. All three are exploring, making short flights, and are eating well. The owlets are wearing temporary colored leg bands to identify them while they are housed together; the bands will be removed this fall and replaced with permanent metal U.S. Fish & Wildlife bands prior to their release.

On March 27, a homeowner in Augusta County found a young Great Horned Owl in the front yard. The rescuer was unsure if the owl was injured or orphaned, so picked it up and brought it to the Wildlife Center for an examination.

The veterinary team found a few flat flies on the young owl, but otherwise, the bird was healthy. The front-desk staff called the homeowners to see if they could locate the owlet’s nest on their property, but they did not see a nest. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie visited the property to look as well, but there was no sign of any Great Horned Owls.

Latest Update: April 16, 2018

Great Horned Owlets #18-0210 and 18-0299 are both doing well; they are now eating whole food [dead mice] twice a day and have both gained weight.  The rehab team reports that Papa G’Ho is getting more defensive of the babies, and has flown at the staff when the owlets were handled for weighing.

Waynesboro is still experiencing some cold springtime temperatures; the two owlets will come inside during the next couple of nights when temperatures are forecasted to reach the lower 30’s. The owlets [still in their crate] will be returned to Papa’s flight pen during the day.

On March 27, a homeowner in Augusta County found a young Great Horned Owl in the front yard. The rescuer was unsure if the owl was injured or orphaned, so picked it up and brought it to the Wildlife Center for an examination.

The veterinary team found a few flat flies on the young owl, but otherwise, the bird was healthy. The front-desk staff called the homeowners to see if they could locate the owlet’s nest on their property, but they did not see a nest. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie visited the property to look as well, but there was no sign of any Great Horned Owls.

Latest Update: April 9, 2018

Great Horned Owlet #18-0210 has been eating well during the past few days; the owlet has gained more than 250 grams since admission and currently weighs 930 grams!  At the end of last week, the rehabilitation team moved Papa G’Ho, the Center’s non-releasable Great Horned Owl surrogate dad, into a crate facing the young owlet. This sort of “howdy housing” will allow the owls to see and hear each other in an indoor setting. Once the weather is consistently warmer, Papa and the baby will be moved to a small outdoor enclosure.

Black Bear #18-1952

On July 11, an adult female Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The severely thin and mangy bear had been seen in Loudoun County; DGIF biologists were able to trap the bear on July 10 to bring her to the Center for treatment.

Latest Update: September 18, 2018

Black Bear #18-1952 is ready for release!

The veterinary team and biologists with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries conferred last week after the successful root canal of the bear’s injured tooth. Since the bear has made a full recovery from mange, nearly doubled her weight, and is ready for the fall and winter season, everyone decided it would be best to get the adult bear back to the wild.

On July 11, an adult female Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The severely thin and mangy bear had been seen in Loudoun County; DGIF biologists were able to trap the bear on July 10 to bring her to the Center for treatment.

Latest Update: September 13, 2018

On the morning of September 13, Dr. Peach darted and sedated Black Bear #18-1952 so that she could be loaded into DGIF biologist Jaime Sajecki’s transport truck to head to Richmond for a root canal.

On July 11, an adult female Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The severely thin and mangy bear had been seen in Loudoun County; DGIF biologists were able to trap the bear on July 10 to bring her to the Center for treatment.

Latest Update: September 10, 2018

Black Bear #18-1952 has been doing well in the Center’s Black Bear Complex as she continues to recover from her severe mange infestation. Now that the bear is stable, gaining weight, and growing in her fur, Dr. Peach decided it was time to address the issue of the bear’s fractured canine.

On July 11, an adult female Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The severely thin and mangy bear had been seen in Loudoun County; DGIF biologists were able to trap the bear on July 10 to bring her to the Center for treatment.

Latest Update: August 22, 2018

Black Bear #18-1952 was sedated and anesthetized for a six-week follow-up examination today. Dr. Peach was thrilled to find that the bear had grown in a significant amount of hair – the difference between admission and today is striking!

On July 11, an adult female Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The severely thin and mangy bear had been seen in Loudoun County; DGIF biologists were able to trap the bear on July 10 to bring her to the Center for treatment.

Latest Update: July 25, 2018

On July 25, Dr. Peach darted and anesthetized Black Bear #18-1952 for a follow-up examination. It’s been two weeks since the bear’s admission and treatment, and Dr. Peach wanted to carefully check the bear’s skin and hair coat, and also perform another skin scraping to check for mange mites.

On July 11, an adult female Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The severely thin and mangy bear had been seen in Loudoun County; DGIF biologists were able to trap the bear on July 10 to bring her to the Center for treatment.

Latest Update: July 16, 2018

Black Bear #18-1952 is quiet but alert in the Center’s Bear Pen enclosure; she’s eating readily and has been observed walking in the enclosure. The bear received her one dose of oral medication on Thursday, July 12. The bear will be darted and sedated on July 25 – two weeks after admission – for additional skin scrapes, blood work, and a physical examination.

Bald Eagle #18-2440

On August 14, a private citizen in Westmoreland County noticed a Bald Eagle grounded on a rocky area of the Potomac River with what appeared to be an injured wing, possibly the result of a fight with another eagle. The eagle was captured that day, and was transported to Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transferred the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following afternoon.

Latest Update: September 18, 2018

Bald Eagle #18-2440 has been flying very well during the past two weeks, and is able to complete an average of 12 or more passes perch-to-perch during daily exercise sessions. The rehabilitation team reports that the bird has great height and form while flying, and bumped the eagle up to a goal of 15+ passes during each exercise session this week. Dr. Karra examined the bird’s sutures during a routine feet and feather check on September 17; the sutures were found to be clean and intact.  

On August 14, a private citizen in Westmoreland County noticed a Bald Eagle grounded on a rocky area of the Potomac River with what appeared to be an injured wing, possibly the result of a fight with another eagle. The eagle was captured that day, and was transported to Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transferred the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following afternoon.

Latest Update: September 6, 2018

During the past week, Bald Eagle #18-2440 has been doing well and seems to be making a steady recovery. On September 6, the eagle was brought indoors and anesthetized to be the subject of a special project with researchers from Purdue University. Following the testing, veterinary staff closely examined the sutures used to close the eagle’s puncture wound on August 15.

Black Bear #18-2569

On August 27, a yearling male Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bear had been spotted in Madison County for a couple of weeks; he was thin and weak. A private citizen was able to enclose the bear in an empty dog kennel; DGIF biologists responded to the scene to sedate and transport the bear to the Center.

Latest Update: September 11, 2018

Black Bear yearling #18-2569 was sedated and anesthetized on Thursday, September 6 for a follow-up physical exam and blood work. Dr. Peach found that the wound on the bear’s face was healing well; blood work showed signs of improvement. The bear gained 1.2 kg since his admission and appears to be eating and walking normally in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure.

At this point, Dr. Peach does not anticipate any issues that will prevent the yearling’s release; the bear just needs to fully heal from the wound on his upper jaw, and needs to gain more weight.

On August 27, a yearling male Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The bear had been spotted in Madison County for a couple of weeks; he was thin and weak. A private citizen was able to enclose the bear in an empty dog kennel; DGIF biologists responded to the scene to sedate and transport the bear to the Center.

Latest Update: September 4, 2018

In the days following his admission, Black Bear yearling #18-2569 ate well and appeared bright and alert. The vet staff carefully checked the wound on the bear’s face each day and noted that it appeared to be static. On August 31, the yearling was moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure to continue his treatment and observation. At this point, the bear is moving and eating normally and he’ll be examined again on September 6.

Bald Eaglet #18-1139

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: September 6, 2018

On September 6, Bald Eagle #18-1139 was released in Virginia Beach!

In the past two weeks, the eaglet flew well in flight pen A3, and did not display any unusual behavior. Test results came back negative; the bird appeared to be in great health. Dr. Ernesto believes that the unusual behavior displayed by the young eaglet was due to the eagle’s personality – the bird is more defensive and tends to “stand his ground” more than other eagles the Center has recently treated. The eaglet’s behavior is reminiscent of Bald Eagle NX, treated at the Wildlife Center in 2011-2012.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: August 27, 2018

The veterinary team has been carefully assessing Bald Eagle #18-1139 during the past week, including monitoring the bird’s behavior on Critter Cam. The eagle is often perched on the very highest perches in the enclosure and has no issues flying down to low perches for food, and returning to the high perches.

The test results for the aspergillosis panel have not yet returned. The team will wait for test results and will continue monitoring, but so far, no unusual behavior has been seen.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: August 20, 2018

During the past five days, Bald Eaglet #18-1139 has not been flying well in the A3 flight pen. It’s been difficult for the staff to fully evaluate, as the eaglet is also extremely stubborn, but the staff became concerned last week when the young bird flew into a perch.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: August 13, 2018

Eagle biologist Jeff Cooper will be at the Wildlife Center during the week of August 20 to assist wildlife rehabilitator Brie with fitting a GPS transmitter on Bald Eaglet #18-1139 prior to release. Brie is learning about the fitting process; once she’s fully trained, she can place any available GPS backpacks on her own.

In the meantime, daily exercise continues for the young bird; the staff report that the eaglet is flying 15 or more passes in the A3 flight pen.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: August 6, 2018

Bald Eaglet #18-1139 has been flying well during the past week; the young eagle has gained more stamina, and while he’s a little stubborn during some exercise sessions, the quality of his flight is good. The rehab team is now able to get the eagle to fly about 15 times perch-to-perch during each exercises session.

Wildlife rehabilitator Brie reached out to state eagle biologist Jeff Cooper about the possibility of a GPS transmitter; Jeff has a unit for the eaglet, and just needs to coordinate an appropriate date for fitting the unit on the eaglet as he gets close to release.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: July 23, 2018

Bald Eagle #18-1139 is flying an average of five to 10 passes during each daily exercise session. The rehab team reports that the bird is inconsistent with flight; some days the eaglet is able to fly 10 or more passes with good stamina and strong flight, but on other days, the eaglet is not as adept at maneuvering in the flight space. It’s likely that the young bird just needs additional time to practice flight.

The eaglet currently weighs 3.43 kg.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: July 16, 2018

Bald Eaglet #18-1139 is doing well in flight pen A3. Wildlife rehabilitation intern Shannon reports that the eaglet has been flying an average of four to six passes during each exercise session and that the bird’s stamina is improving week to week. The rehab staff will aim to have the eagle fly an average of five to 10 passes during exercise during the coming week.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: July 6, 2018

Bald Eaglet #18-1139 has been doing well in flight pen A3 during the past couple of weeks. The eagle’s weight is stable, and the bird has been making a few flights around the large flight area. On July 5, the rehabilitation team began a formal daily exercise program for the young bird, to slowly build his stamina during the next month. If all goes well, the young bird could be released sometime in mid- to late August.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: June 21, 2018

Bald Eaglet #18-1139 has been doing well since fledging in flight pen A3; the bird is making short flights each day, and the staff have not noted any sign of a wing droop. The bird is eating well and weighs a little more than 3.0 kg. The eaglets feathers have grown in, and the veterinary staff began regularly foot and feather checks for the young bird, which will take place every other week. Once the bird is a little older, the rehab staff will start daily exercise to prepare it for release.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: June 11, 2018

Bald Eaglet #18-1139 has been doing well in the tower of A3 for the past week. The eagle has been moving around and perching normally; no additional issues have been seen with the bird’s shoulder in this limited space. On June 10, additional radiographs were taken to check on the eagle’s left shoulder injury; the vet team was happy to report that the bird’s initial issues had resolved. The eaglets eyes are also within normal limits.

On May 25, a young Bald Eagle nestling fell from its nest in Virginia Beach; the eaglet hit a branch and stayed there for two nights, before falling out of the tree entirely on Sunday, May 27. Rescuers were unsure if the eaglet was injured; they also didn’t want to risk re-nesting the bird and making the eaglet’s siblings jump from the nest prematurely. The nest is known as #1401 by the Center for Conservation Biology’s eagle nest monitoring project; the parent of this young eagle is known as “ND”, one of the young from the Norfolk Botanical Garden nest.

Latest Update: June 5, 2018

During the past week, Bald Eagle #18-1139 has been doing well, and no wing droop has been noted since a few days following admission.

The bird has been eating well and was transitioned to a diet of whole mice [instead of a plate of chopped rat].

On June 1, the rehabilitation team moved the eaglet to the tower in outdoor flight pen A3; the tower connects to the larger flight pen, and when the eaglet is ready to fledge, the screen between the two spaces can be removed so the eagle can “branch out” into the larger space.

Black Bear cubs of 2018

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 28, 2018

Wildlife rehabilitation intern Shannon reports that all of the cubs are doing well in the Bear Complex – they are exploring, climbing, and utilizing all of their one-acre space. Shannon says that the bears are fairly wary of their next-door neighbor, adult bear #18-1952.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 23, 2018

The Black Bear cubs of 2018 were successfully moved to the Bear Complex on Thursday, August 23!

Dr. Peach sedated the bears so that she could draw blood for the final week of her mange medication study. All of the bears are in excellent shape, and are quite large! The bears were weighed before the move:

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: August 10, 2018

The 11 Black Bear cubs have been doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; the cubs are eating well and growing quickly! The wildlife rehabilitation team will be happy to move the bears to the Bear Complex in two weeks. At this point, the plan is to allow the cubs to roam in yard #1 and yard #2 in the complex, which will give all 11 cubs access to a one-acre area.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: July 26, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well; they are eating, growing, playing, and enjoying their daily enrichment! The wildlife rehabilitation team have been taking short videos of various enrichment items that are introduced to the cubs – including:

Bamboo “wind chimes”:

 

Creative firehose toys, stuffed with goodies:

 

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: July 6, 2018

The 11 Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The bears were fully weaned from their “mush bowls” this week, and are now eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, seeds, insects, and greens. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie said that none of the bears seemed to miss their mush bowls in the past two days, and the cubs are eating a lot more “adult foods” now, which means the Wildlife Center kitchen is going through a good bit of produce!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 25, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center; they are all still receiving one mush bowl each, plus an ever-expanding “adult” diet of fruits, vegetables, seeds, and insects. All cubs have been weaned from their bottle feedings and soon will be weaned from their bear formula mush bowls entirely – wildlife rehabilitator Brie anticipates discontinuing mush for most of the cubs at the start of July, though the smallest cub, #18-1089 [Double Pink] may continue to receive a mush bowl while she’s housed separately.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 18, 2018

Last week, the cubs began Dr. Peach’s study on a new drug for treating mange in Black Bears. The cubs received the medication on Thursday and had blood draws on Friday; everything went smoothly. Dr. Peach had the opportunity to check each cub thoroughly during the blood draw process; she said all 10 cubs appeared to be in good condition. Some of the cubs still have some hair loss due to ringworm, but overall, they look good and no additional hair loss has developed.  The next blood draw for the study will take place on Thursday, June 21.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 12, 2018

The 10 Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure; they are sampling a variety of different foods that have been introduced to their diet – apples, pomegranates, other fruits, and greens. Each cub is also receiving a mush bowl daily, and Orange, Green, and Red tagged bears are also still bottle-feeding once a day, though as of June 11, Brie noted that they showed less interest.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: June 4, 2018

The eight black bear cubs in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure are doing well and gaining weight. On Thursday, May 31, the rehabilitation staff weighed the cubs, most for the last time without sedation; they are now too big and strong to be handled and weighed while awake. The staff will continue to weigh Double Green tag until he reaches 5 kg.

Current weights [5/31] are:

Green Tag: 8.1 kgs
Orange Tag: 8.25 kgs
No Tag: 7.6 kgs
Pink Tag: 7 kgs
Red: 5.9 kgs
Yellow Tag: 8.4 kgs
White Tag: 6.6 kgs
Double Green Tags: 3.4 kgs

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 23, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; cub #8 will be joining them soon! Last week, the Center admitted another Black Bear cub, but since he only weighed 2.5 kg at admission, he has some weight to put on first before joining the others in the main enclosures. At today’s weigh-in, he was 2.7 kg – so should be able to come out of his Zinger crate in the next week. 

 

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 10, 2018

The Black Bear cubs are doing well since their move to the Large Mammal enclosure earlier this week. The former Green Tag was unhappy to be separated from her siblings as her ear healed, but fortunately on the evening of May 9, wildlife rehabilitator Brie examined it and thought it was healed enough to be introduced to the others. All seven cubs are housed together in one side of the Large Mammal enclosure; the rehab staff will get the other side ready in the next couple of days so that the cubs have more space to play! Watch them on Critter Cam 3.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 9, 2018

During the past week, the rehabilitation staff have been carefully monitoring the lesions on Pink Tag’s face; No Tag and (future) Red Tag also developed some small patches of hair loss. The staff took several hair samples and the Center’s diagnostic team started a DTM  (dermatophyte test medium) to check for the ringworm fungus. On Monday, May 7, results came back positive for ringworm growth. The technicians were able to “type” the ringworm and concluded that the bears have a highly contagious form of the fungus.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: May 4, 2018

The seven bear cubs are doing well at the Center; the wildlife rehabilitation team looking forward to getting at least half of these rambunctious cubs into the Large Mammal enclosure area as soon as possible! Within the next week, a few door repairs should be complete, and the cubs that weigh more than 3.0 kgs will be able to move.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 26, 2018

Wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that the bear cubs are enjoying their new space in the sheltered outdoor Metal Cage Complex. Most of the other small enclosures used for housing raptors have been cleared out of the space so that the bear cubs have plenty of room to run around during their play sessions. The rehabilitation team even constructed a fun jungle gym for the cubs, though Brie notes that the cubs are also happy trying to climb the walls and door!

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 23, 2018

The five Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Center; they continue to eat three times a day and are increasingly energetic and playful with one another. Brie reports that cub #18-0383, the newest cub admitted, has been a little more lethargic than the other cubs; he may just be settling in and adjusting to his new siblings, but the cub will have blood drawn later this week for another analysis.

In April 2018, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2018. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers or were orphaned. 

Bear cubs will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2018 cubs will be released in the spring of 2019.

Latest Update: April 17, 2018

Here's a glimpse into the playtime of four growing Black Bear cubs ... 

 

 

White-tailed Deer Fawns of 2018

 Each spring and summer, the Wildlife Center of Virginia admits dozens of White-tailed Deer fawns. The most common reasons fawns are admitted to the Center include injuries due to collisions with vehicles, dog attacks, lack of parental care (orphaned), and unintended “fawn-napping”.

Latest Update: August 13, 2018

During the spring and summer months, the Wildlife Center admitted and assessed 30 White-tailed Deer fawns that were later transferred to other permitted rehabilitators in the state. The transferred fawns were healthy and needed minor or no veterinary care.

Black Bear cub #18-1089

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: July 3, 2018

On July 2, the veterinary team brought Black Bear cub #18-1089 into the hospital for an examination of the injured hind limb and bandage removal. The bear was sedated for the exam; Dr. Ingrid and veterinary technician intern Jenna found that the bear’s toe amputation site was clean and healing well. They decided to leave the bandage off and applied a protective silver spray to the small wound. The bear’s formerly fractured leg feels healed and stable, and the bear was cleared to be in the entire Large Mammal Isolation enclosure with the other 10 cubs.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: June 22, 2018

On Friday, June 22, the veterinary team anesthetized Black Bear cub #18-1089 for follow-up radiographs and a bandage change. The team was pleased to find that the bear’s fractured leg is healing well; the femur has healed well and is very stable, and there is a solid callus formed on the tibia. The veterinarians decided to leave the splint off and re-bandaged the cub’s healing foot.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: June 18, 2018

On June 17, the veterinary team anesthetized Black Bear cub #18-1089 for radiographs and a bandage change. The cub has been contained in a Zinger crate to limit her movement during the healing period, though the rehabilitation staff have reported that the cub has been a difficult patient, since she likes to knock over her water, which gets her bandage wet.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: June 13, 2018

On June 6, Black Bear cub #18-1089 was moved to the vestibule of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Due to the cub’s injuries and bandage, the young bear needs to remain in a Zinger crate until her leg is fully healed, but at least she is able to hear, see, and smell the other 10 cubs at the Center. Each day, the rehabilitation staff checks the bear’s bandage as they clean her crate and offer her a mush bowl twice a day. The bear is eating well and has gained weight.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: June 4, 2018

The staff reports that the bear cub #18-1089 is feisty and eating well. On June 3, Dr. Monica was able to apply a hard cast to the cub’s fractured leg. To keep the hard cast clean, it’s covered with removable vet wrap that will likely need to be changed daily as it becomes dirty. The cast will remain on for three weeks, but the staff will take radiographs every week to check on the healing progress; radiographs can be taken through the cast.

On May 24, a Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Highland County. The Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and were able to capture and transport the bear to the Wildlife Center.

Upon admission, Dr. Monica examined the small cub. There was blood coming from one of the bear’s hind legs; Dr. Monica found a significant laceration on the female cub’s back left leg, with exposed and ruptured muscle. Radiographs revealed fractures of the left tibia and femur. Blood work and a skin scraping were within normal limits. The bear weighed 2.18 kg.

Latest Update: May 28, 2018

The veterinary team has been closely monitoring Black Bear cub #18-1089’s bandage in the days since her admission. On Sunday, Dr. Monica anesthetized the cub so that she could check and clean the bear’s healing leg laceration; she also attempted fitting the cub with a custom cast. Unfortunately, the casting material didn’t set properly, so Dr. Monica replaced the bandage with a splint again, and another attempt will be made this week when new casting material comes in.

Black Bear cubs #18-1315 and 1316

On June 6, the Wildlife Center admitted two orphaned cubs from Amherst County – Black Bear cubs #18-1315 and #18-1316.

Latest Update: June 12, 2018

Black Bear cubs #18-1315 [Double Yellow] and #18-1316 [Double Orange] are settling in at the Wildlife Center. The rehab team has been offering the bears a juvenile bear meal, which consists of soaked dog chow, fruits, and soft vegetables, as well as a “mush bowl” (a thickened formula made for bears). The cubs are reportedly more interested in their juvenile meal rather than their mush.

Black Bear cub #18-0933

On May 18, the Wildlife Center admitted a young Black Bear cub from Smyth County. The bear was reportedly found by a young man who was hiking earlier this week; the teenager picked up the cub and took it home. After a couple of days, the family called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries because the bear was “mean”.

Latest Update: May 28, 2018

Last week, the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries biologists received word that Black Bear cub #18-0933 had been kept for a longer period of time than originally reported; the family had the cub for at least a week, not two days. During that period, the cub bit multiple people, which had to be reported to the health department.

Black Bear cubs #18-0349 and #18-0350

On Thursday, April 12, a female bear was hit and killed while crossing the road in Franklin County, Virginia. She had two cubs with her, both of which were rescued by Virginia State Police. The cubs were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center on the evening of Friday, April 13 and within a couple of hours were picked up and transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by outreach coordinator Raina.

Latest Update: April 16, 2018

The four Black Bear cubs at the Center are all settling in well – wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that all of the cubs have gained weight since their Friday admissions. Each set of sibling cubs is housed in a zinger crate, though all four cubs have been introduced to each other and have a supervised group play time at each feeding. 

The rehab team reports that Orange Tag and Green Tag are both bottle-feeding well; No Tag and Pink Tag don’t particularly care for the bottle but are very interested in their mush bowls [thickened formula and baby food].

Black Bear cubs #18-0345 & 18-0346

The 2018 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 13 – when the first two cubs of the year were admitted!

Latest Update: April 16, 2018

The four Black Bear cubs at the Center are all settling in well – wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that all of the cubs have gained weight since their Friday admissions. Each set of sibling cubs is housed in a zinger crate, though all four cubs have been introduced to each other and have a supervised group play time at each feeding. 

The rehab team reports that Orange Tag and Green Tag are both bottle-feeding well; No Tag and Pink Tag don’t particularly care for the bottle but are very interested in their mush bowls [thickened formula and baby food].

Canada Goose #18-2730

On September 13, a roofing crew spotted an adult Canada Goose on the roof of Petco in Staunton. The goose was quiet and not moving much; it appeared as though the goose had been on the roof for a significant period of time and could not get down. Staunton Animal Control Officers responded to the scene and called the Staunton Fire Department; rescuers were able to use a bucket truck to retrieve the distressed goose.

Great Horned Owl #18-2502

On August 20, Great Horned Owl #18-2502 was admitted from Bath County, Virginia; the circumstances around the owl’s rescue were not clear, but the bird presented weak and malodorous with damp and tattered feathers. The owl was also dull and in poor body condition; it had likely been suffering from an illness or injury that hindered its ability to hunt and capture food.

Black Bear cubs #18-0497 & #18-0498

On April 25, two DGIF biologists responded to a bear cub call in Amherst County, Virginia. Two small cubs had been seen in a tree for more than 24 hours; the tree was beside a road with a sharp curve, and multiple people had stopped to look at the cubs. There was no sign of their mother in the area; a Conservation Police Officer recommended rescuing the cubs for both human and bear safety. One of the DGIF biologists was able to climb the tree to safely retrieve the two cubs. 

Black Bear cub #18-0383

On April 17, a man was driving home from work when he saw a young Black Bear cub sitting by the side of the road. He watched the cub for about an hour; there was no sign of the sow, but the cub kept approaching a flooded creek. After no signs of the sow, the rescuer picked up the cub and called the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries. A biologist picked up the cub, and the young bear was transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia that same day.