Current Patients

Black Bear cubs #20-0107, 20-0108, and 20-0109

On February 17, three infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in Floyd County, Virginia. The circumstances surrounding the bear cubs’ rescue are not clear, but they were taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke for the night before they were transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia the following morning.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Black Bear cubs #20-0105 & #20-0106

On the morning of February 16, a private citizen in Smyth County contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries when two infant Black Bear cubs were discovered in a box on the private citizen’s porch. There was no information with the cubs; no one knows how or when they were found. A conservation officer with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries picked up the cubs and they were transported to the Wildlife Center later that same evening.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

On the morning of February 21, Center staff received word that biologists with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries found appropriate potential foster mothers for the five Black Bear cubs currently in care. A biologist picked up all five cubs; Center staff are waiting for more details and (hopefully) successful outcomes.

Red-tailed Hawk #19-2663

On August 22, an immature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Bedford County, Virginia. The property owner, who works at Peak View Animal Hospital, took the hawk to her clinic for stabilization before the young bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

Red-tailed Hawk #19-2663 has been thriving outdoors in a large flight pen. The rehabilitators have been exercising the bird daily, and it has been doing well, although it is still flying too low to the ground, likely due to the missing flight feathers. Although the bird’s flight height is unsatisfactory, its stamina is adequate as well as its ability to maneuver around obstacles. The veterinary team will continue to monitor its exercises closely.

On August 22, an immature Red-tailed Hawk was found down in a field in Bedford County, Virginia. The property owner, who works at Peak View Animal Hospital, took the hawk to her clinic for stabilization before the young bird was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: January 23, 2020

Red-tailed Hawk #19-2663 has been doing well in the Center’s A2 flight pen; the bird is eating well and has been offering Critter Cam viewers some nice, up-close shots!

Bald Eagle #20-0055

On January 24, an adult Bald Eagle reportedly “fell from the sky” and crash-landed in Accomack County. The eagle was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator for care before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: February 21, 2020

Bald Eagle #20-0055 has been spending all of its time outdoors during the past week. The staff had hoped that the more natural setting of an outdoor enclosure would help improve the patient's healing process and allow the bird to be more comfortable.  The eagle still has a noted head tilt, but is receiving physical therapy to remedy this. Blood samples continue to be taken at regular intervals to monitor lead levels. 

On January 24, an adult Bald Eagle reportedly “fell from the sky” and crash-landed in Accomack County. The eagle was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator for care before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: February 10, 2020

Another lead test was performed on February 4; results came back at 0.155 ppm – a much reduced result compared to the level at the eagle’s admission at the end of January. The vet staff started another round of chelation therapy [both injectable and oral] to further reduce the lead in the bird’s system. On February 10, a lead test was performed with a result of 0.05 ppm. The vet staff decided to continue just the oral chelation medication for the next five days.

On January 24, an adult Bald Eagle reportedly “fell from the sky” and crash-landed in Accomack County. The eagle was taken to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator for care before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: February 3, 2020

In the week following his admission, Bald Eagle #20-0055 made some slight improvements after receiving his first round of chelation therapy and intravenous fluids. On January 31, the eagle was bright and hydrated enough to discontinue the IV fluids, though the veterinarians also noted a significant right-sided head tilt which persists.

The eagle will have another lead test on February 4, which will determine if a second round of chelation therapy is needed. The eagle is intermittently eating on his own, though some days requires hand-feeding a portion of his meal.

Black Bear #19-3292

On December 11, a young Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Madison County, Virginia. A private citizen saw the bear in the same area for several weeks; the bear appeared weak and as if it was slowing declining in health and mobility.

Dr. Claire, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the male bear when he arrived. Based on the bear’s size and dentition, this bear was likely born in the winter of 2019 – making him, by some standards, a “cub” – though turning into a yearling next month. In Virginia, the median birth date for bear cubs is in mid-January.

Latest Update: February 14, 2020

On February 13, Black Bear yearlings #19-3305 (Pink Tag) and #19-3292 (Green Tag), were successfully moved from their individual Bear Pen enclosures to the transition area of the Center’s Bear Complex! Before the move, Dr. Claire sedated the bears so that she could test a skin scrape sample for mites, a fecal sample for internal parasites, and draw blood for later testing. Test results were within normal limits, and the yearlings have increased in weight. Veterinary staff report that each yearling is in good body condition. Before the move, each bear was weighed:

On December 11, a young Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Madison County, Virginia. A private citizen saw the bear in the same area for several weeks; the bear appeared weak and as if it was slowing declining in health and mobility.

Dr. Claire, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the male bear when he arrived. Based on the bear’s size and dentition, this bear was likely born in the winter of 2019 – making him, by some standards, a “cub” – though turning into a yearling next month. In Virginia, the median birth date for bear cubs is in mid-January.

Latest Update: February 3, 2020

On February 13, Black Bear #19-3292 and #19-3305 are scheduled for another physical examination, skin scraping, and blood draw. Blood work on both bears will be sent to an outside laboratory to compare thyroid levels; the staff hope that this comparison will help determine if there is a medical cause for the stunted growth of bear #19-3305, or if the bear’s smaller frame may have just been a lack of nutrition in the fall.

On December 11, a young Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Madison County, Virginia. A private citizen saw the bear in the same area for several weeks; the bear appeared weak and as if it was slowing declining in health and mobility.

Dr. Claire, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the male bear when he arrived. Based on the bear’s size and dentition, this bear was likely born in the winter of 2019 – making him, by some standards, a “cub” – though turning into a yearling next month. In Virginia, the median birth date for bear cubs is in mid-January.

Latest Update: January 17, 2020

Black Bear #19-3292 [Green Tag] was sedated for a follow-up examination and skin scraping on January 16. Drs. Claire and Karra, the Center's veterinary interns, found that the bear was well hydrated and had an appropriate body condition -- a big improvement since the bear's admission last month. The bear weighed 20.0 kg, almost doubling in weight in a little more than a month!

A skin scraping did not show any sarcoptic mange mites, and the bear's blood work indicated that his anemia had also resolved. The bear was returned to the Center's Bear Pens.

On December 11, a young Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Madison County, Virginia. A private citizen saw the bear in the same area for several weeks; the bear appeared weak and as if it was slowing declining in health and mobility.

Dr. Claire, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the male bear when he arrived. Based on the bear’s size and dentition, this bear was likely born in the winter of 2019 – making him, by some standards, a “cub” – though turning into a yearling next month. In Virginia, the median birth date for bear cubs is in mid-January.

Latest Update: January 2, 2020

Both juvenile Black Bears admitted in late December 2019 are doing well. While the two bears are not housed together, they are both in the Center’s Bear Pens; Black Bear #19-3305 [now Pink Tag] is in Bear Pen 1, and Black Bear #19-3292 [now Green Tag] is in Bear Pen 3. Both will be housed in their respective locations until they are entirely free from their mange mites.

On December 11, a young Black Bear was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Madison County, Virginia. A private citizen saw the bear in the same area for several weeks; the bear appeared weak and as if it was slowing declining in health and mobility.

Dr. Claire, the Center’s veterinary intern, examined the male bear when he arrived. Based on the bear’s size and dentition, this bear was likely born in the winter of 2019 – making him, by some standards, a “cub” – though turning into a yearling next month. In Virginia, the median birth date for bear cubs is in mid-January.

Latest Update: December 16, 2019

Black Bear #19-3292 was moved to the Center’s Bear Pen on the afternoon of December 12; this space is a good location for housing mange positive patients, since the concrete block enclosure can be entirely disinfected, which will prevent mange mites from persisting in the environment. The rehabilitation staff report that the bear is fairly quiet; it’s likely that the bear is still uncomfortable due to the mite infestation. The bear is eating some wet dog food on his own.

Black Bear #19-3305

On December 16, a young Black Bear cub was reported to have approached a hunter in the woods in Augusta County, Virginia. There was no sow seen in the area, and the bear was picked up and given to a private citizen where it was kept in a house for three days. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and admitted on December 19. 

Latest Update: February 14, 2020

On February 13, Black Bear yearlings #19-3305 (Pink Tag) and #19-3282 (Green Tag), were successfully moved from their individual Bear Pen enclosures to the transition area of the Center’s Bear Complex! Before the move, Dr. Claire sedated the bears so that she could test a skin scrape sample for mites, a fecal sample for internal parasites, and draw blood for later testing. Test results were within normal limits, and the yearlings have increased in weight. Veterinary staff report that each yearling is in good body condition. Before the move, each bear was weighed:

On December 16, a young Black Bear cub was reported to have approached a hunter in the woods in Augusta County, Virginia. There was no sow seen in the area, and the bear was picked up and given to a private citizen where it was kept in a house for three days. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and admitted on December 19. 

Latest Update: February 3, 2020

On February 13, Black Bear #19-3292 and #19-3305 are scheduled for another physical examination, skin scraping, and blood draw. Blood work on both bears will be sent to an outside laboratory to compare thyroid levels; the staff hope that this comparison will help determine if there is a medical cause for the stunted growth of bear #19-3305, or if the bear’s smaller frame may have just been a lack of nutrition in the fall.

On December 16, a young Black Bear cub was reported to have approached a hunter in the woods in Augusta County, Virginia. There was no sow seen in the area, and the bear was picked up and given to a private citizen where it was kept in a house for three days. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and admitted on December 19. 

Latest Update: January 20, 2020

On Saturday, January 18, the veterinary team anesthetized Black Bear #19-3305 for a follow-up physical examination, blood work, and skin scrapes.

Dr. Karra, the Center’s senior veterinary intern, found that the bear was in excellent body condition, with a body condition score of 3/5 [a score of 1/5 is very thin, and a score of 5/5 is very overweight].  The bear weighed 15 kg, which is more than double than her admission weight [7.3 kg]. A complete blood count was within normal limits and indicated that the bear’s anemia had resolved. The skin scrapes were negative for mites.

On December 16, a young Black Bear cub was reported to have approached a hunter in the woods in Augusta County, Virginia. There was no sow seen in the area, and the bear was picked up and given to a private citizen where it was kept in a house for three days. The bear was transported to the Wildlife Center and admitted on December 19. 

Latest Update: January 2, 2020

Both juvenile Black Bears admitted in late December 2019 are doing well. While the two bears are not housed together, they are both in the Center’s Bear Pens; Black Bear #19-3305 [now Pink Tag] is in Bear Pen 1, and Black Bear #19-3292 [now Green Tag] is in Bear Pen 3. Both will be housed in their respective locations until they are entirely free from their mange mites.

Black Bear cub #20-0084

On February 6, an infant male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found the evening before in Washington County when a family dog brought home the tiny cub.  The homeowners were unsure where the cub came from, so they called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (DGIF). A biologist transported the cub to the Center.

Latest Update: February 12, 2020

A quick report from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries: all went well with today’s foster! The biologists darted and sedated this particular sow so that they could replace her radio collar and also place Black Bear cub #20-0084 with her. The biologist reported that the sow had three biological cubs … and now, one extra! We’ll receive more details (and photos) tomorrow.

On February 6, an infant male Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found the evening before in Washington County when a family dog brought home the tiny cub.  The homeowners were unsure where the cub came from, so they called the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (DGIF). A biologist transported the cub to the Center.

Latest Update: February 10, 2020

The two Black Bear cubs did well at the Center over the weekend; they were introduced to one another on Friday, and spent the weekend in the same incubator, on the same schedule of bottle-feeding.

Muskrat #20-0093

On February 9, an adult male muskrat was admitted from Augusta County after it was found struggling to pull itself onto a pond bank. The rescuer brought the muskrat to the Center immediately, where it was admitted as patient #20-0093, making it the first muskrat admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia since 2016.

Latest Update: February 12, 2020

At the end of the day on February 11, veterinary staff syringe-fed muskrat #20-0093 and checked its vitals. During this time, the muskrat still showed an irregular heartbeat and weak pulse. The veterinary team placed an IV catheter to deliver fluids for the night due to the muskrat’s continued low body temperature and dehydration. Unfortunately, the muskrat died later that night and was found on the morning of February 12 by veterinary staff during morning treatments.

Black Bear cub #20-0064

On January 22, an infant Black Bear cub was found in Craig County by power line workers; the cub was on top of a brush pile and was nearly frozen. The workers thought the cub was dead at first, but after they warmed the infant bear, she started crying. 

Latest Update: February 10, 2020

The Center received news this afternoon that today’s Black Bear cub fostering attempt was a great success!

The DGIF biologist reported: “The sow held tight in her den and immediately scooped this little cub in when I placed her near the den entrance. The cubs in this den (we think there are two) are probably about two- to three-weeks-old.

“This is a large sow (225+ lbs) so she should be able to take care of them all! I rechecked her this evening approximately 4.5 hours post-foster and they are all tucked in the den quiet as can be … perfect scenario!

On January 22, an infant Black Bear cub was found in Craig County by power line workers; the cub was on top of a brush pile and was nearly frozen. The workers thought the cub was dead at first, but after they warmed the infant bear, she started crying. 

Latest Update: February 10, 2020

The two Black Bear cubs did well at the Center over the weekend; they were introduced to one another on Friday, and spent the weekend in the same incubator, on the same schedule of bottle-feeding.

On January 22, an infant Black Bear cub was found in Craig County by power line workers; the cub was on top of a brush pile and was nearly frozen. The workers thought the cub was dead at first, but after they warmed the infant bear, she started crying. 

Latest Update: February 3, 2020

Black Bear cub #20-0064 has been eating well for the rehabilitation staff at her ‘round-the-clock bottle feedings

Bobcat #19-2408

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: January 24, 2020

On January 23, veterinary staff sedated the bobcat to weigh her, collect a blood and fecal sample, and perform a physical exam.  Upon examination of the bobcat’s mouth, Dr. Claire noticed that the bobcat now has her full set of adult teeth and has a healthy coat.  Her blood and fecal exams came back within normal limits.  Although the bobcat was a lower weight [3.49 kg] than veterinary staff expected, Dr. Claire noted that she has a healthy body condition score.

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: January 3, 2020

Bobcat #19-2408 has been doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure during the past month. The young bobcat receives a wide variety of enrichment items throughout the week; the latest enrichment is a couple of undecorated Christmas trees!

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: November 13, 2019

Bobcat #19-2408 has been doing well during the past month in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation (LMI) enclosure. The rehabilitation staff opened up both sides of the enclosure, so the young cat has plenty of space to explore. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey notes that the Bobcat is still very wary and uninterested in humans.

The rehabilitation extern students have enjoyed making a variety of enrichment items for the juvenile cat – including a specially carved pumpkin!

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: October 17, 2019

On October 16, the veterinary team anesthetized Bobcat #19-2408 for repeat diagnostics and a physical exam.

The kitten was captured in a net and injected with sedative medication. The Bobcat fell asleep quickly and was brought down to the clinic for radiographs, blood collection, and a physical exam.

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: September 24, 2019

On September 18, the veterinary and rehabilitation teams anesthetized Bobcat #19-2408 for a physical exam and weight, so see if the bobcat was large enough to move to the Large Mammal enclosure. The staff were surprised to see that the Bobcat still has a rather small stature and had not gained much weight [1.94 kg]; veterinary intern Dr. Karra noted that the young cat was in fair body condition – she’s just undersized, compared to what the staff expected. Dr. Karra reported, “The remainder of the physical exam was within normal limits.

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: September 9, 2019

After the Black Bear cubs recently moved from the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure to the Black Bear Complex, the rehabilitation staff decided to weigh Bobcat #19-2408 on September 6 to see if she was large enough to move to the Large Mammal enclosure. The bobcat weighed 1.89 kg – which was less than the rehabilitation staff was expecting. The Bobcat has been eating well, so the rehabilitation staff increased the kitten’s food, and also collected a fecal sample.

On July 30, the Wildlife Center admitted a female Bobcat kitten from Floyd County, Virginia. The rescuer found the young bobcat inside a chicken coop and no adult bobcat was observed nearby.

Upon arrival to the hospital, the bobcat was bright, feisty, and growling. An initial examination revealed that the kitten was thin and dehydrated with ticks around her ears and eyes. Blood work, radiographs, and the rest of her physical exam were unremarkable. The veterinary team gave the bobcat fluids and sprayed her with a topical treatment for fleas and ticks.

Latest Update: August 27, 2019

Bobcat kitten #19-2408 has been doing well in the Center's Bear Pen enclosure; the wildlife rehabilitation staff check on the kitten each day when they drop off food, though the staff note that they don't always readily see the young elusive cat. This is an excellent sign; raising a lone bobcat kitten isn't ideal, but fortunately, this young animal doesn't want anything to do with humans. 

Black Bear cubs of 2019

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: January 17, 2020

Happy Birthday, bears! Today is the median birth date for Black Bears in Virginia -- so at the Wildlife Center, any bears currently in care receive a birthday celebration. 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: November 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Black Bear Complex at the Center.  As many Critter Cam viewers can attest, the two young females have put on quite a lot of weight in the past two months!

Recently, the bears enjoyed a very special meal of restaurant-grade salmon – a local restaurant received their ordered shipment of fish, but while the salmon was still cold, it wasn’t frozen, which meant they were unable to serve the fish to humans. Instead, they donated the cold salmon to the Center – and the bears enjoyed an extra special meal!

 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 29, 2019

On August 28, the rehabilitation team successfully moved the 2019 Black Bear cubs to the Bear Complex! Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey and wildlife rehab intern Kylee were unable to safely trap the cubs in a zinger crate, choosing instead to dart and anesthetize both of the bears within the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. After Dr. Ernesto conducted a visual examination both of the cubs spent the night in a smaller transition area within the complex, giving them plenty of time to acclimate to their new environment.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 27, 2019

After months of repairs and work on the Bear Complex, the two-acre facility is once again ready to house bears!  Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey and rehabilitation intern Kylee will do a final walk-through and fence test on the morning of August 28. If all checks out, the two cubs will be moved to yard #1 later that day. The rehabilitation staff will try to trap the two cups in a zinger crate [without sedation] for moving. Watch for them when Critter Cam changes to the bear yard!

In the meantime, the cubs have been enjoying a variety of food and enrichment – including live fish!

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: August 9, 2019

Repairs and preparation of the Black Bear Complex continue, though are not yet complete! The plumbing issues have been fixed, though the construction company will be back one more time to work on a sliding door gate to one of the bear yards, which is difficult to open due to erosion issues. An amazing crew of volunteers has been working on trimming all the tree limbs around the fences; this work is nearly complete.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: July 18, 2019

Despite the high temperatures, the two Black Bear cubs have been quite active in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure lately! Critter Cam viewers have been able to capture the cubs using the ceiling of the enclosure like a set of monkey bars.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: July 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Center’s Large Mammal enclosure; last week, the wildlife rehabilitation staff opened up the connecting chute between both sides of the enclosure, to allow the cubs to have access to both sides.

Construction crews have been working on Black Bear Complex repairs during the past month; they have been able to fix a broken pipe and several valves in the water system throughout the two-acre complex. There are still some additional plumbing issues to adjust in the next two weeks.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 24, 2019

Orange Tag continues to be a picky eater; the rehabilitation staff have continued to offer a wide variety of foods, and it appears that the cub typically eats novel food items, then loses interest the next time it is offered. 

On Saturday, Dr. Karra administered additional anti-nausea medication and an appetite stimulant. The bear has the full run of the right side of the Large Mammal enclosure but is still separate from the other two cubs so that he has full access to his food and so the rehabilitation staff can closely monitor all food intake.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 20, 2019

Orange Tag ate about 60% of his meal overnight; rather than eating the A/D again, he mostly ate baby food and canned dog food. The cub only lost 200 grams, and while the rehabilitation staff would prefer that the cub gain, 200 grams is a small loss. The rehabilitation team offered a variety of foods once again, this time adding baby food on top of the A/D diet. 

If the cub's appetite decreases again, the staff will order more anti-nausea medications, along with an appetite stimulant. 

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 19, 2019

Wildlife rehabilitation intern Kylee reported that Orange Tag ate his second meal of A/D during the day on June 18. For the evening feeding, she offered more A/D, plus a mush bowl. On the morning of June 19, wildlife rehabilitator Shannon found that the cub had eaten about half of the A/D, but showed no interest in the mush bowl. The cub is feisty and bluff charging the rehabilitation staff as normal.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 18, 2019

On the afternoon of June 17, Dr. Karra anesthetized Black Bear cub #19-1176 [Orange Tag] for radiographs and an ultrasound to see if any abdominal masses or obstruction could be seen. The small bear cub was extremely feisty before anesthesia – even though the cub has not been eating the past few days, he is not acting sick.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

Rehabilitators Shannon and Kylee assessed Black Bear cub Orange Tag this morning and found that, once again, he did not eat last night’s food. He did gain a small amount of weight but generally was not interested in today’s food either, which is highly unusual.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 17, 2019

The trio of Black Bear cubs have been entertaining a variety of Critter Cam viewers. They appear to enjoy sleeping in their hammock but often wake up for wild play sessions throughout the day. Orange Tag has been playing and sleeping with his new sisters, though the two larger females are typically first to arrive at the mush bowls once they are delivered. The staff have been carefully monitoring the cubs’ food intake.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 10, 2019

Black Bear cub Orange Tag has been recovering from his forehead laceration; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon noted that the wound looked a little open over the weekend, though it appears as though it was a small area and no additional sutures were needed. Dr. Karra carefully applied a topical ointment to prevent flystrike.

In late April 2019, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from several locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2019. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would begin naturally dispersing from their mothers. The 2019 cubs will be released in the spring of 2020.

Latest Update: June 7, 2019

The two Black Bear Cub sisters [No Tag and White Tag] are currently being fed just once a day; each cub gets a mush bowl, plus a shared “juvenile” bear meal that weighs six pounds! The juvenile meal contains fruits, veggies, seeds, greens, and dog food. The rehabilitation team reports that the two sisters are doing well and remain quite wild and feisty. The cubs are still being treated with a topical antifungal spray, though this treatment is increasingly difficult.

American Toad #19-3281

American Toad #19-3281 was admitted to the Center on December 7 after a private citizen found the amphibian in a plant she moved inside.  It is likely that this toad was hibernating in the plant, and came out of hibernation after being warmed by inside temperatures. 

Latest Update: January 10, 2020

On December 19, Dr. Karra noted that Toad #19-3281 has been eating well, and ...

Barn Owl #19-3223

On November 17, a rescuer found a young Barn Own by the side of the road in Rockingham County. Suspecting that the owl was hit by a vehicle, the rescuer was able to contain the owl and transported it to the Wildlife Center for treatment.

Latest Update: January 3, 2020

Barn Owl #19-3223 was moved to one of the Center’s Flight Pens, and began exercising on December 21.  The bird is flying well – it maintains great height, has adequate stamina, is able to perch well, and has silent flight.  The plan is to wait to release the bird until warmer weather arrives, when there are more food resources available in the wild.

On November 17, a rescuer found a young Barn Own by the side of the road in Rockingham County. Suspecting that the owl was hit by a vehicle, the rescuer was able to contain the owl and transported it to the Wildlife Center for treatment.

Latest Update: December 10, 2019

Barn Owl #19-3223 has been doing well and eating consistently in a small outdoor enclosure. The bird has been gaining weight and its body condition is improving; once the Barn Owl gains a little more weight, the staff will consider moving the bird to a flight pen.

Black Bear cub #19-0546 [No Tag]

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 31, 2019

The Black Bear cub “sisters” are growing up! At this week’s weigh-in,  No Tag was 5.2 kg, and White Tag was unable to be picked up for weighing. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey reported that the two are very feisty and have zero interest in humans; she and fellow rehabilitator Shannon decided that since both cubs are more than 5.0 kg and very difficult to handle, they won't be weighed until they are fully weaned and ready to go to the Complex. White Tag has been very protective of her smaller introduced sister.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 22, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Large Mammal enclosure, as many Critter Cam viewers have seen for themselves!

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 15, 2019

On the afternoon of May 14, the two Black Bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and are now on cam! Check out Critter Cam 2 to watch Cub Cam.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cub "sisters" are doing well; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon recorded a couple of video clips during a recent playtime. The cubs are more quiet and wary than past cubs – while the two enjoy playing with one another, they’re always careful to keep a watchful eye on the humans who are present.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Black Bear cubs #19-0492 and #19-0546 [Pink] are both growing quickly; they’re eating “mush bowls” three times a day and are gaining weight. At last weigh-in, #19-0492 weighed 4.20 kg and #19-0546 [Pink] was 3.11 kg.

On April 22, a citizen in Augusta County saw a Black Bear cub by itself but did not interfere. When the lone cub was spotted the following evening, the citizen contacted the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, who came and picked up the cub. On the afternoon of April 24, DGIF officials brought the cub to the Wildlife Center.  

Latest Update: May 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs -- #19-0492 and #19-0546 – are both doing well and enjoying each other’s company. Both have gained weight since arrival and are eating well; #19-0492 prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a bowl, instead of a bottle and weighs 2.95 kg. The newer bear has been bottle-feeding well though within the past couple days, is transitioning to bowl feeding as well. The cubs are becoming more active, according to the rehab staff.

Black Bear cub #19-0492 [White Tag]

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 31, 2019

The Black Bear cub “sisters” are growing up! At this week’s weigh-in,  No Tag was 5.2 kg, and White Tag was unable to be picked up for weighing. Wildlife rehabilitator Kelsey reported that the two are very feisty and have zero interest in humans; she and fellow rehabilitator Shannon decided that since both cubs are more than 5.0 kg and very difficult to handle, they won't be weighed until they are fully weaned and ready to go to the Complex. White Tag has been very protective of her smaller introduced sister.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 22, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs are doing well in the Large Mammal enclosure, as many Critter Cam viewers have seen for themselves!

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 15, 2019

On the afternoon of May 14, the two Black Bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure – and are now on cam! Check out Critter Cam 2 to watch Cub Cam.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 13, 2019

The two Black Bear cub "sisters" are doing well; wildlife rehabilitator Shannon recorded a couple of video clips during a recent playtime. The cubs are more quiet and wary than past cubs – while the two enjoy playing with one another, they’re always careful to keep a watchful eye on the humans who are present.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 10, 2019

Black Bear cubs #19-0492 and #19-0546 [Pink] are both growing quickly; they’re eating “mush bowls” three times a day and are gaining weight. At last weigh-in, #19-0492 weighed 4.20 kg and #19-0546 [Pink] was 3.11 kg.

The 2019 Black Bear cub season started on Friday, April 19 with the arrival of cub #19-0492!

Latest Update: May 1, 2019

The two Black Bear cubs -- #19-0492 and #19-0546 – are both doing well and enjoying each other’s company. Both have gained weight since arrival and are eating well; #19-0492 prefers to eat her thickened formula out of a bowl, instead of a bottle and weighs 2.95 kg. The newer bear has been bottle-feeding well though within the past couple days, is transitioning to bowl feeding as well. The cubs are becoming more active, according to the rehab staff.