Current Patients

Bald Eagle #17-0968

On May 16, a female young adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The eagle was found on the ground by an animal control officer in a landfill in Stafford, VA. This bird was unable to fly and would fall over when approached.

Latest Update: September 21, 2017

Throughout July and early August, Bald Eagle #17-0968 recovered and self-exercised in flight pen A2. The bird’s carpal injuries healed well, and by mid-August, the bird was ready for more active daily exercise with the rehabilitation team. By early September, the eagle was flying about eight to 10 passes during each exercise session, though struggled to gain altitude during flight. On September 9, the eagle was moved to flight pen A3, where the bird could have a little more space during exercise.

On May 16, a female young adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The eagle was found on the ground by an animal control officer in a landfill in Stafford, VA. This bird was unable to fly and would fall over when approached.

Latest Update: July 4, 2017

The veterinary staff have been monitoring Bald Eagle #17-0968’s injured wings. Both carpi remain swollen but appear to be healing gradually.

On July 3, the veterinary staff drew fluid from the carpus joints on both wings and will perform cytology; the tests will help determine if there is a bacterial infection causing the swelling that will require a course of antibiotics.

On May 16, a female young adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The eagle was found on the ground by an animal control officer in a landfill in Stafford, VA. This bird was unable to fly and would fall over when approached.

Latest Update: June 22, 2017

On May 28, Bald Eagle #17-0968 was moved to a larger outdoor enclosure, allowing staff to better assess the bird's flight. Unfortunately, while housed in a larger pen, eagle #17-0968 injured his carpus (wrist) on each wing.

"Bumpers" are applied to an eagle's wing when it is housed in outdoor enclosures to limit injuries to the carpi; bumpers are composed of layers of protective padding and duct tape, secured along the wrist joint. In this case, the bumpers did not prevent the injuries.

On May 16, a female young adult Bald Eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The eagle was found on the ground by an animal control officer in a landfill in Stafford, VA. This bird was unable to fly and would fall over when approached.

Latest Update: May 24, 2017

Bald Eagle #17-0968 was moved to an outdoor enclosure on May 21 and has been eating more consistently on its own.

Test results show that the bird was exposed to pesticides, but the test does not identify a specific chemical. It's unclear if the exposure caused any of the eagle's symptoms upon presentation at the Center.

The veterinary team will continue to monitor the eagle's attitude and appetite.

Common Snapping Turtle #17-2211

On August 26, the Wildlife Center admitted a Snapping Turtle from Spotsylvania County. Snapping Turtle #17-2211 was rescued by animal control after it was observed with
Latest Update: September 12, 2017

Snapping Turtle #17-2211 has been doing well post-surgery. On September 11, Drs. Ernesto and Alexa applied an acrylic epoxy to the turtle’s surgical site; the epoxy will protect the shell where it was cut open during surgery, and allow the staff to soak the turtle. Snapping Turtles, like most aquatic turtles, have better appetites and increased hydration when they are allowed to eat in water.

On August 26, the Wildlife Center admitted a Snapping Turtle from Spotsylvania County. Snapping Turtle #17-2211 was rescued by animal control after it was observed with
Latest Update: September 6, 2017

Dr. Ernesto, Dr. Alexa, and veterinary technician Jenna performed Snapping Turtle 17-2211’s plastronectomy on the afternoon of September 6. The surgery lasted roughly four hours, but the team was unable to remove the hook.

 

Bald Eagle #17-2257 [HK]

On September 1, an adult male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Virginia Beach. The eagle was banded as “HK” – a well-known bird in the eagle community. This eagle hatched in 2009 and is a full sibling to Buddy, the Center’s education Bald Eagle, who hatched in 2008. HK has been nesting at the Honey Bee Golf Course in Virginia Beach and is often spotted and photographed in the birding community.

Latest Update: September 12, 2017
On September 11, Dr. Ernesto performed a necropsy of Bald Eagle HK (patient #17-2257) to determine what injuries the eagle may have sustained and what might have caused the eagle’s death.
 

On September 1, an adult male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Virginia Beach. The eagle was banded as “HK” – a well-known bird in the eagle community. This eagle hatched in 2009 and is a full sibling to Buddy, the Center’s education Bald Eagle, who hatched in 2008. HK has been nesting at the Honey Bee Golf Course in Virginia Beach and is often spotted and photographed in the birding community.

Latest Update: September 9, 2017

On Saturday, September 9, the veterinary team noted that the blood flow to HK's fractured right leg was not making any improvements, despite warm compresses and salt bath soaks, physical therapy, and laser therapy. The use of the eagle's left leg was unchanged. After the extensive morning treatments, Dr. Ernesto decided to check on the eagle again in the evening, and if there was no improvement, he would need to make a difficult decision. 

On September 1, an adult male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Virginia Beach. The eagle was banded as “HK” – a well-known bird in the eagle community. This eagle hatched in 2009 and is a full sibling to Buddy, the Center’s education Bald Eagle, who hatched in 2008. HK has been nesting at the Honey Bee Golf Course in Virginia Beach and is often spotted and photographed in the birding community.

Latest Update: September 8, 2017

The veterinary team ran additional blood work on Bald Eagle HK; results indicated a high white blood cell count, which is concerning to Dr. Ernesto. On Friday, September 8, Dr. Ernesto grew even more concerned when he examined HK and found that the eagle’s right leg – the fractured leg – did not have appropriate blood flow. Dr. Ernesto removed one of the pins from the external fixation to help blood flow; he also scheduled a regimen of warm compresses to HK’s daily therapy, which also includes physical therapy and laser therapy.

On September 1, an adult male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Virginia Beach. The eagle was banded as “HK” – a well-known bird in the eagle community. This eagle hatched in 2009 and is a full sibling to Buddy, the Center’s education Bald Eagle, who hatched in 2008. HK has been nesting at the Honey Bee Golf Course in Virginia Beach and is often spotted and photographed in the birding community.

Latest Update: September 7, 2017

The morning after Bald Eagle HK’s surgery, Dr. Ernesto noted that the eagle was able to bear weight on his injured right leg, indicating that the external fixator was able to offer support to the eagle; however, HK was not bearing weight on his left leg. When HK is quietly resting in his enclosure, he often lies down with his wings spread out for balance.

On September 1, an adult male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Virginia Beach. The eagle was banded as “HK” – a well-known bird in the eagle community. This eagle hatched in 2009 and is a full sibling to Buddy, the Center’s education Bald Eagle, who hatched in 2008. HK has been nesting at the Honey Bee Golf Course in Virginia Beach and is often spotted and photographed in the birding community.

Latest Update: September 5, 2017

On the morning of September 5, Dr. Ernesto and licensed veterinary technician Leigh-Ann took Bald Eagle HK to surgery. Critter Cam viewers were able to watch the events on cam!

On September 1, an adult male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Virginia Beach. The eagle was banded as “HK” – a well-known bird in the eagle community. This eagle hatched in 2009 and is a full sibling to Buddy, the Center’s education Bald Eagle, who hatched in 2008. HK has been nesting at the Honey Bee Golf Course in Virginia Beach and is often spotted and photographed in the birding community.

Latest Update: September 4, 2017

Bald Eagle HK remained bright and alert throughout the weekend, and ate on his own Saturday evening and Sunday! The leg bandage has remained clean and dry, and there is evidence of minor swelling of the injured leg and foot, which is to be expected.

On September 1, an adult male Bald Eagle was hit by a vehicle in Virginia Beach. The eagle was banded as “HK” – a well-known bird in the eagle community. This eagle hatched in 2009 and is a full sibling to Buddy, the Center’s education Bald Eagle, who hatched in 2008. HK has been nesting at the Honey Bee Golf Course in Virginia Beach and is often spotted and photographed in the birding community.

Latest Update: September 2, 2017

On Friday evening, prior to settling HK into a crate for the night, Dr. Monica, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, carefully crafted a splint for the eagle's broken leg using tongue depressors. She then applied a “Robert Jones bandage”, which is used to offer support to the eagle if he attempts to stand on the broken leg. 

Black Bear cub #17-2035

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: September 9, 2017

Black Bear cub #17-2035 has been healing well during the past couple of weeks; the team has observed the cub placing weight on his healing leg, and the bear has been eating well. With the recent movement of Black Bear yearling #17-1767, cub #17-2035 was moved to the connecting chute of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure.

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: August 15, 2017

Black Bear cub #17-2035 has been doing well since last week’s surgery; he’s bright, alert, and feisty! The rehab staff have been offering a bowl of soft food for the bear, which the cub is eating well.

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: August 11, 2017

On August 11, Drs. Alexa and Monica transported Black Bear cub #17-2035 to the Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates in the Richmond area for surgery with Dr. Alex Padron. Dr. Alexa gave many updates during the surgery – Dr. Padron was able to successfully insert two pins into the bear’s fractured humerus before inserting a plate over the fracture site. He was pleased with the alignment.

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: August 9, 2017

During the past two days, Drs. Monica and Alexa have been coordinating the surgery for Black Bear cub #17-2035. Dr. Alex Padron of Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates in Richmond has agreed to do the surgery, which is tentatively scheduled for Friday, August 11. Dr. Padron will plate the bear’s fractured humerus; he’ll also investigate the young bear’s suspected mandible fracture and may wire the fracture if needed.

Black Bear yearling #17-1767

On July 12, a female Black Bear yearling was found on the side of the road in Madison County, Virginia. An officer with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear and transport her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: September 9, 2017

On September 8, Dr. Peach darted and anesthetized Black Bear yearling #17-1767 so that she could examine and radiograph the yearling’s fractured leg. Today marks eight weeks since the bear’s surgery with Dr. Padron.

Dr. Peach found that the bear’s fractured leg has healed well; the fracture line is still visible, but a callus formation is present. The bear currently has a slightly decreased range of motion in his left elbow compared to his right, but nothing that is of concern right now. The bear is in great condition and weighed in at 27.4 kg.

On July 12, a female Black Bear yearling was found on the side of the road in Madison County, Virginia. An officer with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear and transport her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: July 27, 2017

Black Bear #17-1767 has been healing well during the past week and is nearly at the two-week post-op mark. The bear has been eating well and bearing weight on all four legs equally. On July 26, the staff moved the yearling to the chute of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; this will allow the bear a little more room than a zinger crate and will allow her to see and smell a more natural environment. The bear will need to remain in this small space to heal for several more weeks before she’s allowed to be more active in a larger space.

On July 12, a female Black Bear yearling was found on the side of the road in Madison County, Virginia. An officer with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear and transport her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: July 21, 2017

Black Bear #17-1767 has been healing well this week. Each day, the vet team checks on the bear to monitor her appetite, how much weight she’s bearing on her injured leg, and her general attitude. So far, the bear has shifted fairly easily between zinger crates in the holding room; this is the best way to ensure the bear gets a clean area each day. The yearling has been placing her weight on her injured leg for the past few days, and is eating well.

On July 12, a female Black Bear yearling was found on the side of the road in Madison County, Virginia. An officer with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries responded to the scene and was able to capture the bear and transport her to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: July 17, 2017

On the morning of July 14, Wildlife Center staff transported Black Bear yearling #17-1767 to the Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates in Richmond. In addition to placing screws in the bear’s elbow to fixate the fracture site, Dr. Padron inserted a metal plate on the bear’s ulna (the outermost of two bones in the forearm). 

Black Bear #17-1298

On June 5, the Wildlife Center admitted an adult Black Bear from Shenandoah County, after the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was able to successfully trap the bear. The bear had symptoms of mange -- significant hair loss and thickened skin all over her body.

The female bear was quiet and alert on arrival; Dr. Ernesto was able to dart and anesthetize the bear for a physical exam. The bear was severely dehydrated and thin; skin scrapes confirmed mange mites. Blood was drawn for analysis, which indicated that the bear was anemic. She weighed in at 31.7 kg.

Latest Update: September 8, 2017

Black Bear #17-1298 has been doing well the past few weeks; her hair coat has fully grown back in, and the bear is in great body condition. On September 7, a biologist with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries came to the Center to pick up the bear for release. The bear weighed in at 54.5 kg.

On June 5, the Wildlife Center admitted an adult Black Bear from Shenandoah County, after the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was able to successfully trap the bear. The bear had symptoms of mange -- significant hair loss and thickened skin all over her body.

The female bear was quiet and alert on arrival; Dr. Ernesto was able to dart and anesthetize the bear for a physical exam. The bear was severely dehydrated and thin; skin scrapes confirmed mange mites. Blood was drawn for analysis, which indicated that the bear was anemic. She weighed in at 31.7 kg.

Latest Update: August 1, 2017

On July 28, Dr. Peach darted and anesthetized Black Bear #17-1298 so that the bear could be moved to the Bear Complex. The darting went well and the bear was moved to yard #3; the bear’s hair coat continues to improve. The veterinary team will monitor the bear weekly until it’s time to release the bear back to the wild.

On June 5, the Wildlife Center admitted an adult Black Bear from Shenandoah County, after the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was able to successfully trap the bear. The bear had symptoms of mange -- significant hair loss and thickened skin all over her body.

The female bear was quiet and alert on arrival; Dr. Ernesto was able to dart and anesthetize the bear for a physical exam. The bear was severely dehydrated and thin; skin scrapes confirmed mange mites. Blood was drawn for analysis, which indicated that the bear was anemic. She weighed in at 31.7 kg.

Latest Update: July 13, 2017

On July 12, Drs. Ernesto and Peach darted and sedated Black Bear #17-1298 for an exam and follow-up skin scrapings. The bear has been evaluated weekly since admission, though it’s been difficult for the vets to fully evaluate how much of the bear’s hair is growing back, since she tends to avoid people and retreat to her den area during evaluations. On physical exam, the veterinarians were pleasantly surprised to find that the bear’s fur and skin have improved significantly; at this point, there is only about 20% hair loss. Skin scrapings were negative for mange mites.

Black Bear cub #17-1180

On May 28, a citizen in Lexington, Virginia, saw a young black bear cub by the side of the road. The bear was alone, and appeared to have an injured front paw.

Latest Update: August 25, 2017

Last week, the Wildlife Center team was able to take Black Bear cub #17-1180 off-site for a CT scan. The procedure went quickly, and the images were sent to veterinary radiologists for interpretation. The radiologists found that while the brain and spine appeared to be within normal limits, the cub’s lungs were not normal. There are a variety of infectious diseases that could affect a cub’s lungs and also cause neurologic symptoms, though at this point, the damage is irreversible.

On May 28, a citizen in Lexington, Virginia, saw a young black bear cub by the side of the road. The bear was alone, and appeared to have an injured front paw.

Latest Update: August 11, 2017

While Black Bear cub #17-1180 has been generally stable during the past week, he continues to have unresolved neurological episodes. The test results for Baylis ascaris came back negative. Dr. Ernesto decided that the next step for this cub is a CT scan; this could help the team determine if the cub has a congenital brain defect. The team are working with an outside facility to schedule a CT scan during the week of August 14.

On May 28, a citizen in Lexington, Virginia, saw a young black bear cub by the side of the road. The bear was alone, and appeared to have an injured front paw.

Latest Update: August 3, 2017

Black Bear cub #17-1180 has been in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure during the past week; the bear is eating well but the staff have continued to observe the intermittent neurologic issues. Some test results came back this week: the cub’s bile acids test (for liver issues) was within normal limits, and the cub is also negative for distemper and parvovirus. Test results for Baylisascaris have not yet come back.

On May 28, a citizen in Lexington, Virginia, saw a young black bear cub by the side of the road. The bear was alone, and appeared to have an injured front paw.

Latest Update: July 27, 2017

The veterinary team has continued to note intermittent neurologic symptoms in Black Bear cub #17-1180 during the past week. On July 27, the veterinary team will be drawing several blood samples from the cub – one after fasting, then another sample after the bear eats. These samples will be sent to an outside laboratory for bile acid tests. After all the samples are drawn today, the cub will be moved back to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure for observation.

On May 28, a citizen in Lexington, Virginia, saw a young black bear cub by the side of the road. The bear was alone, and appeared to have an injured front paw.

Latest Update: July 19, 2017

Results from Black Bear #17-1180’s fructosamine test came back on Tuesday afternoon. Dr. Ernesto reports that the bear’s glucose levels are normal, which confirms the more simple in-house lab tests. The bear’s bile acid levels are high, which can be an indication of liver disease. The bear was not fasted prior to this test, which can also affect results. The team will draw more blood samples this week after the bear is fasted and another sample after the bear is fed; these samples should yield additional diagnostic information.

On May 28, a citizen in Lexington, Virginia, saw a young black bear cub by the side of the road. The bear was alone, and appeared to have an injured front paw.

Latest Update: July 17, 2017

On Friday, July 14, the veterinary team decided to perform a physical examination on Black Bear cub #17-1180 [Double Pink Tags]. The rehabilitation staff had noted some intermittent ataxia [incoordination] recently, which is not a new symptom for this cub. Days after admission in May, the bear exhibited the same intermittent unsteadiness before he was moved in with the other bear cubs. The veterinary team never found a cause for the neurologic issues, but it appears as though the symptoms periodically have resurfaced during the past month.

On May 28, a citizen in Lexington, Virginia, saw a young black bear cub by the side of the road. The bear was alone, and appeared to have an injured front paw.

Latest Update: June 1, 2017

Earlier this week, Black Bear cub #17-1180 was moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The rehab team moved the other eight cubs to one side of the enclosure; cub #17-1180 was placed on the other side for additional monitoring. The cub was fairly quiet, but on May 31, appeared to be too quiet; the team decided to bring the cub into the hospital for an exam.

Black Bear cubs of 2017

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: August 22, 2017

On August 22, wildlife rehabilitator Brie decided that Black Bear cub #17-2065, Double Orange Tags, should be large enough to move to the Black Bear Complex. The rehab team was successfully able to lure the cub into a live trap with grapes; the cub was then transported to the complex and was released into the main yard.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: July 25, 2017

On July 25, the rehabilitation team started moving the 2017 Black Bear cubs to the Bear Complex! Wildlife rehabilitator Brie and wildlife rehab interns Shannon McCabe and Shannon Mazurowski were able to contain four bears – No Tag, Double Green Tags, Yellow Tag, and Red Tag – in crates and moved them to the yard quickly. Pink Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag had to be live trapped in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; each of the bears fell for their baited trap fairly quickly.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: July 10, 2017

The Black Bear cubs of 2017 are doing well; the nine cubs continue to live in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure and receive food once a day, plus some sort of enrichment fun! They’ve been enjoying some watermelon snacks, donated by local grocery stores:

Even new bedding can be an adventure for the cubs:

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: June 14, 2017

The nine Black Bear cubs have been doing well -- many Critter Cam viewers have enjoyed watching them eat, play, and sleep together … the cubs appear to have a lot of energy!

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: June 9, 2017

The Black Bear cubs of 2017 have been doing well at the Wildlife Center. They are rambunctious and playful, and are increasingly a handful for the rehabilitation team! The cubs receive a variety of enrichment -- toys, food, branches, and other special items. On June 6, wildlife rehabilitation extern Ianna made the bears a tightly braided sheet rope for them to climb; wildlife rehabilitator Brie supervised the cubs while they investigated this new toy.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: May 19, 2017

At the end of last week, the rest of the bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Bear cub #17-0760 [Double Green Tag] was isolated for a few more days until he was cleared to move in with the other cubs on May 15.

Wildlife rehabilitators Brie and Linda report that the cubs are active, wild, eating, growling, playing, and just generally crazy. The cubs are eating soft bear foods and receiving mush bowls twice a day; the youngest cub, No Tag, is still being bottle-fed twice a day.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: May 9, 2017

On May 3, wildlife rehabilitator Brie moved Red Tag, Green Tag, and White Tag to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. These three bears are the largest of the cubs, and the Center's metal cage complex, where the cubs had been housed, was getting a little full!  The three cubs began tentatively exploring, and have settled in well. They are currently eating mush bowls twice a day, in addition to other veggies, fruits, and seeds.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: April 28, 2017

The five Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; all are eating and gaining weight! The cubs are currently housed in two zinger crates in the Center's outdoor metals complex, where they can have supervised playtime while smelling and hearing the outdoors.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: April 20, 2017

The four Black Bear cubs have been doing well at the Center; they will soon make the move to the Center's outdoor metal cage complex, where they'll remain in their zinger crates in between supervised play and feeding sessions. They'll move to the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, likely in mid-May.

Current weights are:

Cub #0352: 1.65 kg
Cub #0374: 2.52 kg
Cub #0411: 2.44 kg
Cub #0444: 2.61 kg

The cubs will each soon receive a colored identification tag in one ear.

Here are some recent photos of a bear cub play session!

White-tailed Deer Fawns of 2017

On May 18, the Center received its first deer fawn of 2017 -- officially kicking off "fawn season".

An infant male White-tailed Deer was admitted to the Center as patient #17-0996 after he was orphaned. His mother was hit by a car on May 14, and the fawn was found trying to cross a highway in Montgomery County.

Latest Update: August 8, 2017

The Center is currently caring for four White-tailed Deer fawns. Though dozens of fawns have been admitted in 2017, a number of healthy fawns were transferred to other permitted rehabilitators with available space for fawns at their facilities. When possible and appropriate, healthy baby animals are transferred to other rehabilitators, freeing up space and time at the Center for animals that require specialized medical care.

Bald Eaglet #15-0733

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: July 18, 2017

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service permits were approved for Bald Eagle #15-0733; this means that the bird is one big step closer to going to his new home! At this point, it's been too hot to fly the eagle commercially to the New Mexico Wildlife Center; it's likely that the Center will need to wait until fall to ship the bird, unless alternative arrangements can be made through a private airplane pilot or a long road trip!

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: May 29, 2017

Earlier this year, Bald Eagle #15-0733 received clearance from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) for placement at an educational facility. The immature Bald Eagle will be going to the New Mexico Wildlife Center to be a glove-trained education bird. The New Mexico Wildlife Center has applied for permits with USFWS; once all paperwork is finalized, the bird will go to his new home.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 27, 2016

During the past three months, the rehabilitation staff has continued to exercise Bald Eagle #15-0733. The bird's flight capabilities have not changed much during this time period; the bird is not able to fly all that well, and often flies low to the ground. While the eagle's initial injury may be causing permanent flight deficits, there is also a chance that the limited flight is due to the number of broken feathers the eagle has. At this time of year, many eagles are molting; Bald Eagle #15-0733 has several new feathers growing in.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: March 16, 2016

During the past two months, the rehabilitation staff exercised Bald Eagle #15-0733. Despite daily exercise sessions, the eagle continued to have poor endurance and was often unable to make no more than five to seven passes from end to end. Interim wildlife rehabilitator Kendra noted that Bald Eagle #15-0733 was frequently flappy while flying, unable to maintain height, and often grounded after only a few passes.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: January 29, 2016

After several weeks of rest following imping, Bald Eagle #15-0733 was started on daily exercise in flight pen A3 (along with Bald Eagle #15-1339) on January 28.

Rehabilitation intern Kendra reported that the eagle had poor stamina and maneuvering the first two days of exercise, but this is not unexpected as the eagle becomes re-accustomed to the larger enclosure. The staff will continue to exercise the eagle daily.
 

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: January 4, 2016

On December 24, Bald Eagle #15-0733 was brought into to the Wildlife Center’s hospital for his imping procedure. Seven feathers [five primaries and two secondary feathers] were replaced on the left wing and four feathers [two primaries and two secondary] were replaced on the right wing. The team also replaced eight tail feathers. During the procedure, the team also noted that the eagle had a several flight feathers in “blood”, indicating that these feathers were growing in on their own.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: December 21, 2015

Bald Eagle #15-0733 has remained in the FP4 flight pen during the last month. On December 17, one of the Center’s A-pens [A2] became available, and the young eagle was moved to the larger enclosure. Since Bald Eagle #15-0733 is now in a larger flight pen and the likelihood of causing feather damage is minimized, the veterinary staff scheduled the eagle’s imping [feather replacement] procedure for December 24.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: November 19, 2015

During the past two months, Bald Eagle #15-0733 has remained in a small enclosure. On November 10, the young bird was moved to a slightly larger enclosure – FP4.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: September 10, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 still has not been seen flying much. Repeat radiographs performed on September 7 were largely unremarkable and shows that the fracture site continues to heal. The staff noticed that the bird had many broken tail and wing feathers and decided to move Bald Eaglet #15-0733 to the A3 tower to prevent further damage to the feathers.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: August 28, 2015

The four young Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been doing well during the past month. Three of the young eaglets -- #15-1261, #15-1312, and #15- 1339 -- have gradually started flying. At first, they made short flights to the swinging perches, but soon the short flights were replaced by longer flights up to the tower and flights from end-to-end in the flight pen. All birds are eating well and are maintaining weight.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: July 15, 2015

On July 15, the veterinary staff moved Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 from the tower area to the main flight area of A3. Blood work for Bald Eaglet #15-1261 has improved, and Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s wing has continued to heal well.

This recent move means that four eaglets are now being housed together. They can be identified on Critter Cam by their colorful, protective “wrist” bumpers:

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 30, 2015

Bald Eaglets #15-0733 and #15-1261 were introduced to one another last week; the two young birds appear to be getting along well. Both are eating and gaining weight.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 24, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733’s daily physical therapy sessions have gone well during the past week. During each physical therapy session, one of the veterinarians extends the eagle’s wing to stretch the muscles and ligaments in the wing.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 12, 2015

Follow-up radiographs of Bald Eagle #15-0733’s healing wing were taken on June 4; they revealed that a callus was continuing to form over the fracture sites. Dr. Meghan noted, however, that the bird’s wing was severely contacted. The bird’s bandage was removed to allow the young eagle to extend its wing; daily physical therapy sessions were scheduled.

On May 14, a hatch-year Bald Eaglet was rescued by an animal control officer in King George County. 

Latest Update: June 2, 2015

Bald Eaglet #15-0733 was anesthetized for radiographs on May 29. Dr. Meghan found that calluses were forming on both wing fractures, though there were signs of osteomyelitis

Bald Eagle #16-1664

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: June 26, 2017

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service permits were approved for Bald Eagle #16-1664; this means that the bird is one big step closer to going to his new home! At this point, it's been too hot to fly the eagle commercially to the Tracy Aviary in Utah; it's likely that the Center will need to wait until fall to ship the bird, unless alternative arrangements can be made through a private airplane pilot.

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: February 20, 2017

Within the past month, the Wildlife Center received clearance from USFWS to place non-releasable Bald Eagle #16-1664. The Tracy Aviary, located in Utah, has been looking for an immature Bald Eagle for programs for some time; they will be giving this bird a new home. Paperwork has been started; once USFWS approves of the transfer, the bird the bird will be flown to his new home in Utah.

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: October 17, 2016

Last month, the veterinary team continued to monitor Bald Eagle #16-1664. After observing the eagle's limitations with and without pain medication, the staff believe that the bird can be placed as a non-releasable education bird; it does not appear to be experiencing any discomfort.

The staff first need to submit paperwork with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to get approval for placement; once permission is received, the staff will begin looking for a suitable location for this young eagle. The approval and permitting process typically takes several months.

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: August 24, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-1664 has not been flying well in flight enclosure A3. The bird is unable to gain altitude and consistently tilts to one side while flying to compensate for the reduced mobility in his injured wing.

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: August 12, 2016

Wildlife Center rehabilitation staff have been monitoring Bald Eagle #16-1664 in outdoor enclosure A3, where it is housed with two other eagles. During daily exercise the eagle has not been able to fly well. The bird is unable to gain enough height to successfully perch, and also has a significant tilt to the right in flight. While this is most likely due to the eagle’s compromised left wing, the Wildlife Center will continue the observation process.

On July 22, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries conducted a surprise inspection of a wildlife rehabilitation facility in eastern Virginia, which resulted in the seizure of several birds of prey. Among them was Bald Eagle #16-1664 which was transferred to the Wildlife Center for evaluation and care. No medical records were sent with the birds, but social media reports state that this young eagle hatched earlier this year in Virginia Beach, and is the offspring of "ND", a Bald Eagle that hatched at Norfolk Botanical Garden in 2010.

Latest Update: August 1, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-1664 has been doing well in one of the Center's outdoor enclosures during the past week. The bird is able to get to high perches, is holding both wings appropriately, and is eating well.

During the next few weeks, Center veterinarians will re-evaluate the eagle's left carpal ("wrist") joint to see if the bird is able to fly in a larger space. At this point, the veterinarians know that the bird is unable to extend his left wing fully, due to the compromised joint.

Great Horned Owlet #17-1135

On May 27, the Wildlife Center admitted another baby Great Horned Owl. This young owl was found down on the ground on Chincoteague Island; the bird was taken to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator for treatment before it was transferred to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: June 22, 2017

Great Horned Owlets #17-0363, #17-0885, and #17-1135 are doing well; they are flying and eating consistently on their own.

As of June 21, Papa G'Ho and his three owlets are housed together in one of the outdoor flight pens. When an appropriate, larger enclosure becomes available (likely one of the "A-pens"), the rehabilitation staff will move the four birds; the larger space will give the growing family more room and space for the young birds to practice flying.

Great Horned Owlet #17-0885

On May 11, a Great Horned Owlet was transported to the Wildlife Center from a rehabillitator in Northampton County.

Latest Update: June 22, 2017

Great Horned Owlets #17-0363, #17-0885, and #17-1135 are doing well; they are flying and eating consistently on their own.

As of June 21, Papa G'Ho and his three owlets are housed together in one of the outdoor flight pens. When an appropriate, larger enclosure becomes available (likely one of the "A-pens"), the rehabilitation staff will move the four birds; the larger space will give the growing family more room and space for the young birds to practice flying.

Great Horned Owlet #17-0363

On March 29, a Great Horned owlet was found in Mechanicsville on the ground -- the owlet was below a nest that was 100 feet up in the tree. The rescuer attempted to re-nest the owl, but the nest was too high to easily reach. The rescuer also tried to make a secondary nest for the owlet (in hopes that the parents would find the baby and continue to care for it), but the effort proved unsuccessful. The bird was then brought to a rehabilitator, who transferred the owlet to the Center.

Latest Update: June 22, 2017

Great Horned Owlets #17-0363, #17-0885, and #17-1135 are doing well; they are flying and eating consistently on their own.

As of June 21, Papa G'Ho and his three owlets are housed together in one of the outdoor flight pens. When an appropriate, larger enclosure becomes available (likely one of the "A-pens"), the rehabilitation staff will move the four birds; the larger space will give the growing family more room and space for the young birds to practice flying.

On March 29, a Great Horned owlet was found in Mechanicsville on the ground -- the owlet was below a nest that was 100 feet up in the tree. The rescuer attempted to re-nest the owl, but the nest was too high to easily reach. The rescuer also tried to make a secondary nest for the owlet (in hopes that the parents would find the baby and continue to care for it), but the effort proved unsuccessful. The bird was then brought to a rehabilitator, who transferred the owlet to the Center.

Latest Update: April 24, 2017

Owlet #17-0363 has been gaining weight and adjusting well to life with Papa G’Ho. Papa G'Ho is teaching the owl appropriate behaviors towards humans; when humans approach, the owlets expresses dissatisfaction with snaps and hisses - just like Papa.

Bald Eagle #16-0038

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: May 29, 2017

Earlier this year, Bald Eagle #16-0038 received clearance from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) for placement at an educational facility. The Bald Eagle will be going to live at Mill Mountain Zoo in Roanoke, Virginia. Mill Mountain has applied for permits with the USFWS regional office; once all paperwork is finalized, the bird will go to her new home.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: August 1, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 has remained in flight pen A1, one of the Wildlife Center’s largest outdoor enclosures. The eagle is exercised daily by rehabilitation staff members, who report that the eagle regularly flies approximately 12 laps during each session. Although the eagle is still flying at a low height, on July 31 the bird was observed to be flying with its feet tucked beneath its body. Perching and stamina are reported to be improving as well. As of July 25, the eagle weighed 4.40 kg (9.7 lb).

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: June 8, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 has continued daily exercise during the past two months. The eagle has been making gradual improvement, though still is not flying well enough for release. The eagle typically flies an average of 12-14 laps in the Center’s large A-pen enclosure; 10 of those passes are usually good in quality, though sometimes the eagle misses landing on a perch and then struggles to gain height once grounded.

The staff will continue to exercise the eagle each day.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 30, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038’s feet continue to slowly heal. On March 28, a routine check revealed that the lesion on the eagle’s left foot was swollen. A topical disinfectant and sealing agent were applied to the wound. Center staff continues to monitor the healing progress during bi-weekly foot and feather checks.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 15, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 remained in a small outdoor enclosure throughout the first half of March. On March 14, the veterinary team re-radiographed the eagle’s healing wing, and found that the fracture was healed and very stable. Dr. Dana noted that the eagle’s left wing is mildly stiff, but the bird is able to achieve full wing extension. The wounds on the eagle’s face and feet continue to heal well.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 1, 2016

On February 21, radiographs were taken to check on Bald Eagle #16-0038’s healing fracture; radiographs showed that the fracture alignment was unchanged. Dr. Dana expected to see a little more healing progress, but it’s likely that the fracture has been slower to callus since it’s been challenging for the vet staff to keep the eagle’s wing completely immobile.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 17, 2016

In the 10 days following her admission, Bald Eagle #16-0038 recovered in the Center’s holding room. At first, the eagle mostly left her wing bandage and body wrap alone, but soon it became a daily challenge to get the eagle to leave her bandages on! The eagle regularly picked at her wing bandages, and on a few occasions managed to partly remove or loosen them; Dr. Dana also noted that the bird is so large and strong, that even the body wrap doesn’t completely prevent the bird from slightly moving her injured wing.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 5, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 is recovering quietly at the Wildlife Center. Dr. Dana reports that the eagle is perching, eating well, and mostly leaving her bandages alone, which can be an important component of the healing process! The eagle’s heart rate has been within normal limits during the past two days.

The veterinary team continues to clean the eagle’s foot and face wounds daily; all lacerations are currently static. Repeat radiographs are scheduled for February 13.

Black Bear cub #17-0411

On April 10, a citizen found a lone bear cub near a road. There was no sign of a sow or any other cubs nearby. The Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was called, and after staying the night with a permitted wildlife rehabilitator, the cub was transported by VDGIF officers on the morning of April 11.

Latest Update: April 14, 2017

All three Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The two male cubs are well-matched for each other -- they are closer in age and weight, and enjoy playing with one another. At feeding time, the cubs are allowed free range of the room where they are housed, and they have time to romp and play after eating. The female cub has gained enough weight to graduate to three times a day feedings.

Here are two videos of the cub -- the first video is of the female and first male cub (before the third cub arrived).

Black Bear cub #17-0374

On April 4, a citizen in Madison County, Virginia, found a bear cub by itself. The citizen left the area in case the sow was nearby and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). To ensure that the bear wasn't unintentionally "bear-napped", everyone decided to leave the cub where it was. On the morning of April 5, the cub was still by itself and was crying, so a biologist with VDGIF picked up the cub and transported it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 14, 2017

All three Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The two male cubs are well-matched for each other -- they are closer in age and weight, and enjoy playing with one another. At feeding time, the cubs are allowed free range of the room where they are housed, and they have time to romp and play after eating. The female cub has gained enough weight to graduate to three times a day feedings.

Here are two videos of the cub -- the first video is of the female and first male cub (before the third cub arrived).

On April 4, a citizen in Madison County, Virginia, found a bear cub by itself. The citizen left the area in case the sow was nearby and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). To ensure that the bear wasn't unintentionally "bear-napped", everyone decided to leave the cub where it was. On the morning of April 5, the cub was still by itself and was crying, so a biologist with VDGIF picked up the cub and transported it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 11, 2017

The two bear cubs are doing well; both are eating well and gaining weight. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie says that both are becoming more playful and are wrestling with each other; the male cub is often interested in attempting to play while his new sister eats. The female cub (17-0352) now weighs 1.37 kg while the male (17-0374) weighs 1.90 kg.

On April 4, a citizen in Madison County, Virginia, found a bear cub by itself. The citizen left the area in case the sow was nearby and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). To ensure that the bear wasn't unintentionally "bear-napped", everyone decided to leave the cub where it was. On the morning of April 5, the cub was still by itself and was crying, so a biologist with VDGIF picked up the cub and transported it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 6, 2017

The two bear cubs are doing well and are currently housed together. The female cub is currently taking her bottle well and eating four times a day;  she currently weighs 1.05 kg. The male cub only requires three feedings a day, based on his weight. Dr. Kelli reports that the male cub hasn't quite taken to his bottle yet, but is readily licking his formula and baby food from a lid.

Black Bear cub #17-0352

On March 31, an infant female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found crying under a log near a drainage opening in Roanoke County; the citizen who found the cub was concerned that the bear might fall into the drain and be swept away due to the heavy rain. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation; there was no sign of a sow, and the biologist decided to bring the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 14, 2017

All three Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The two male cubs are well-matched for each other -- they are closer in age and weight, and enjoy playing with one another. At feeding time, the cubs are allowed free range of the room where they are housed, and they have time to romp and play after eating. The female cub has gained enough weight to graduate to three times a day feedings.

Here are two videos of the cub -- the first video is of the female and first male cub (before the third cub arrived).

On March 31, an infant female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found crying under a log near a drainage opening in Roanoke County; the citizen who found the cub was concerned that the bear might fall into the drain and be swept away due to the heavy rain. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation; there was no sign of a sow, and the biologist decided to bring the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 11, 2017

The two bear cubs are doing well; both are eating well and gaining weight. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie says that both are becoming more playful and are wrestling with each other; the male cub is often interested in attempting to play while his new sister eats. The female cub (17-0352) now weighs 1.37 kg while the male (17-0374) weighs 1.90 kg.

On March 31, an infant female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found crying under a log near a drainage opening in Roanoke County; the citizen who found the cub was concerned that the bear might fall into the drain and be swept away due to the heavy rain. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation; there was no sign of a sow, and the biologist decided to bring the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 6, 2017

The two bear cubs are doing well and are currently housed together. The female cub is currently taking her bottle well and eating four times a day;  she currently weighs 1.05 kg. The male cub only requires three feedings a day, based on his weight. Dr. Kelli reports that the male cub hasn't quite taken to his bottle yet, but is readily licking his formula and baby food from a lid.

Fowler's Toad 17-2192

On August 18, a private citizen in Augusta County accidentally stepped on an adult Fowler’s Toad. After several days of observation, it became clear that the toad was injured, and it was transported to the Wildlife Center on August 23. Similar in appearance to the common American Toad, Fowler’s Toads are distinguished by a smaller body size and slightly smaller parotoid glands (the large, toxin excreting glands directly behind the eyes). 

Black Bear cub #17-2065

On August 8, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries brought an orphaned male cub from Patrick County to the Wildlife Center. The cub was bright, alert, and feisty and weighed in at 9.6 kg. Dr. Alexa, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, examined the cub, and found him to be mildly dehydrated, but otherwise healthy. Radiographs and blood work were within normal limits. The bear was given fluids and Dr.

Black Bear cub #17-0760

During the last week of April, a citizen who was kayaking in Alleghany County saw a lone bear cub on a river bank. The finder took some photos and consulted the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). Biologists asked the finder if she'd be willing to go out by kayak again days later to look for the lone cub; she did, and was able to capture the cub.

Black Bear cub #17-0745

On May 2, the wildlife veterinarian with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries delivered two Black Bear cubs to the Wildlife Center. One cub, #17-0744, was a female cub from Wise County, Virginia. The history on the cub is unclear, though it was found on the weekend of April 30.

Black Bear cub #17-0744

On May 2, the wildlife veterinarian with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries delivered two Black Bear cubs to the Wildlife Center. One cub, #17-0744, was a male cub found walking down the side of the road in Wythe County, Virginia.

Black Bear cub #17-0606

On April 24, a small Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Rockbridge County, Virginia, and arrangements were made to transport the cub to the Center the same evening.

Dr. Ernesto, the Center's Hospital Director, examined the female cub upon admission. He found that the cub was thin and dehydrated, weighing in at 1.62 kg. Blood work revealed mild anemia; otherwise, the cub did not have any injuries, and is generally considered healthy. Dr. Ernesto put an orange identification tag in the cub's right ear.

Black Bear cub #17-0444

On the evening of April 14, another Black Bear cub was admitted -- bringing the current cub total up to four!

Cub #17-0444, a female, was found in Bath County when someone observed her in a tree by herself. A Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries biologist was contacted. The cub was left alone to allow her the chance to reunite with her mother; unfortunately, no sow was seen and the cub was still by herself in a tree two days later. The cub's rescuer was able to capture her on Friday and brought her to the Wildlife Center.