Current Patients

Bald Eagle #17-2469

On September 26, a mature male Bald Eagle was found in a backyard in Poquoson, Virginia. Permitted wildlife rehabilitator Tommy White was able to capture the bird and provided initial treatment before he transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: November 16, 2017

Bald Eagle #17-2469 has been flying very well during the past two weeks in flight pen A3. On November 16, the veterinary team drew blood for a pre-release analysis; results were within normal limits.

On September 26, a mature male Bald Eagle was found in a backyard in Poquoson, Virginia. Permitted wildlife rehabilitator Tommy White was able to capture the bird and provided initial treatment before he transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: November 14, 2017

The two Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 continue with their daily exercise; eagle #17-1993 has been struggling with lift and stamina during exercise sessions and is only flying between 5-10 passes each time. Bald Eagle #17-2469 is flying well and is flying at least 15 passes during each session. 

On September 26, a mature male Bald Eagle was found in a backyard in Poquoson, Virginia. Permitted wildlife rehabilitator Tommy White was able to capture the bird and provided initial treatment before he transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: October 30, 2017

The two Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been exercising regularly during the past couple of weeks; both birds are getting along and eating well. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that eagle #17-1993 generally has poor lift and stamina; the bird is exercising about five to 10 passes during each session.

An additional eye examination on Bald Eagle #17-2469 confirmed that bird’s eye injuries should not affect the bird’s vision; the team decided to increase the eagle’s daily exercise regimen to five to 10 passes.

On September 26, a mature male Bald Eagle was found in a backyard in Poquoson, Virginia. Permitted wildlife rehabilitator Tommy White was able to capture the bird and provided initial treatment before he transported the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following day.

Latest Update: October 18, 2017

On October 17, Bald Eagle #17-2469 was moved to flight pen A3, where Bald Eagle #17-1993 is also currently housed. The eagle is able to fly to the perches in the large flight space, though a formal daily exercise plan has not yet been started.

The eagle will need additional eye examinations during the next couple of months. The eagle can be identified by his "stripe"-patterned protective wing bumpers. 

Bald Eagle #17-1993

On July 31, the Wildlife Center admitted a mature male Bald Eagle that was found in the water in Westmoreland County. The eagle was initially rescued and taken to a local wildlife rehabilitator before he was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: November 14, 2017

The two Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 continue with their daily exercise; eagle #17-1993 has been struggling with lift and stamina during exercise sessions and is only flying between 5-10 passes each time. Bald Eagle #17-2469 is flying well and is flying at least 15 passes during each session. 

On July 31, the Wildlife Center admitted a mature male Bald Eagle that was found in the water in Westmoreland County. The eagle was initially rescued and taken to a local wildlife rehabilitator before he was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: October 30, 2017

The two Bald Eagles in flight pen A3 have been exercising regularly during the past couple of weeks; both birds are getting along and eating well. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie reports that eagle #17-1993 generally has poor lift and stamina; the bird is exercising about five to 10 passes during each session.

An additional eye examination on Bald Eagle #17-2469 confirmed that bird’s eye injuries should not affect the bird’s vision; the team decided to increase the eagle’s daily exercise regimen to five to 10 passes.

On July 31, the Wildlife Center admitted a mature male Bald Eagle that was found in the water in Westmoreland County. The eagle was initially rescued and taken to a local wildlife rehabilitator before he was transported and admitted to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: October 18, 2017

On October 10, Bald Eagle #17-1993 was moved to flight pen A3. At first, the bird was not flying well, though was able to make it up to a high perch; the rehabilitation team slowly started a daily exercise regimen for the eagle. About a week later, the staff reported that the eagle was making improvements; the eagle is able to fly from end-to-end in the large flight pen. The rehabilitation team will continue exercise, gradually pushing the bird to fly more laps to prepare him for release.

Bobcat #17-2495

On September 30, a juvenile female bobcat was hit by a vehicle while crossing Route 33 in Rockingham County, Virginia. The bobcat was captured and transported to the Wildlife Center, where Dr. Monica, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, examined the bobcat.

Latest Update: October 30, 2017

Bobcat #17-2495 was moved to the connecting chute of the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure on October 21; this area is larger than the zinger crate in which the bobcat was initially housed but is still a restricted space until the cat’s leg fully heals.

The staff have been happy to report that the bobcat is walking and using all four legs normally – though sometimes instead of walking, the bobcat crouches in the corner and growls at the staff.

Additional radiographs will be taken on November 6.

On September 30, a juvenile female bobcat was hit by a vehicle while crossing Route 33 in Rockingham County, Virginia. The bobcat was captured and transported to the Wildlife Center, where Dr. Monica, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, examined the bobcat.

Latest Update: October 18, 2017

On October 16, Dr. Ernesto took Bobcat #17-2495 back to surgery to replace the pin stabilizing the bobcat’s fractured leg. The pin was fully removed, though attempts to replace the IM pin were unsuccessful; there was a large amount of callus already present over the bone fragments, which made placing the pin difficult. Dr. Ernesto decided to close the bobcat’s incision and to allow the fracture to continue to heal; the wire in the cat’s leg should offer enough stabilization since the bone already has evidence of healing.

Black Bear cubs of 2017

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: October 30, 2017

The 10 Black Bear cubs have been doing well in the Center’s Black Bear Complex; the wildlife rehabilitators have been offering extra food since the bears are in “hyperphagia” – that is, the cubs are eating more during this fall season to put on some winter weight!

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: August 22, 2017

On August 22, wildlife rehabilitator Brie decided that Black Bear cub #17-2065, Double Orange Tags, should be large enough to move to the Black Bear Complex. The rehab team was successfully able to lure the cub into a live trap with grapes; the cub was then transported to the complex and was released into the main yard.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: July 25, 2017

On July 25, the rehabilitation team started moving the 2017 Black Bear cubs to the Bear Complex! Wildlife rehabilitator Brie and wildlife rehab interns Shannon McCabe and Shannon Mazurowski were able to contain four bears – No Tag, Double Green Tags, Yellow Tag, and Red Tag – in crates and moved them to the yard quickly. Pink Tag, White Tag, and Orange Tag had to be live trapped in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure; each of the bears fell for their baited trap fairly quickly.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: July 10, 2017

The Black Bear cubs of 2017 are doing well; the nine cubs continue to live in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure and receive food once a day, plus some sort of enrichment fun! They’ve been enjoying some watermelon snacks, donated by local grocery stores:

Even new bedding can be an adventure for the cubs:

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: June 14, 2017

The nine Black Bear cubs have been doing well -- many Critter Cam viewers have enjoyed watching them eat, play, and sleep together … the cubs appear to have a lot of energy!

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: June 9, 2017

The Black Bear cubs of 2017 have been doing well at the Wildlife Center. They are rambunctious and playful, and are increasingly a handful for the rehabilitation team! The cubs receive a variety of enrichment -- toys, food, branches, and other special items. On June 6, wildlife rehabilitation extern Ianna made the bears a tightly braided sheet rope for them to climb; wildlife rehabilitator Brie supervised the cubs while they investigated this new toy.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: May 19, 2017

At the end of last week, the rest of the bear cubs were moved to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. Bear cub #17-0760 [Double Green Tag] was isolated for a few more days until he was cleared to move in with the other cubs on May 15.

Wildlife rehabilitators Brie and Linda report that the cubs are active, wild, eating, growling, playing, and just generally crazy. The cubs are eating soft bear foods and receiving mush bowls twice a day; the youngest cub, No Tag, is still being bottle-fed twice a day.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: May 9, 2017

On May 3, wildlife rehabilitator Brie moved Red Tag, Green Tag, and White Tag to the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. These three bears are the largest of the cubs, and the Center's metal cage complex, where the cubs had been housed, was getting a little full!  The three cubs began tentatively exploring, and have settled in well. They are currently eating mush bowls twice a day, in addition to other veggies, fruits, and seeds.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: April 28, 2017

The five Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center; all are eating and gaining weight! The cubs are currently housed in two zinger crates in the Center's outdoor metals complex, where they can have supervised playtime while smelling and hearing the outdoors.

At the end of March 2017, the Wildlife Center began admitting this year's bear cubs from locations throughout Virginia. These bears were likely born between early January to mid-February of 2017. In most cases, the cubs were separated from their mothers.

Latest Update: April 20, 2017

The four Black Bear cubs have been doing well at the Center; they will soon make the move to the Center's outdoor metal cage complex, where they'll remain in their zinger crates in between supervised play and feeding sessions. They'll move to the Center's Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, likely in mid-May.

Current weights are:

Cub #0352: 1.65 kg
Cub #0374: 2.52 kg
Cub #0411: 2.44 kg
Cub #0444: 2.61 kg

The cubs will each soon receive a colored identification tag in one ear.

Here are some recent photos of a bear cub play session!

Black Bear cub #17-2035

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: October 20, 2017

Black Bear cub #17-2035 [Double Yellow Tags] has been doing well during the past two weeks in the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure. The bear is walking normally on his now-healed leg, and on October 19, the staff decided to move him to the Bear Complex. A live trap was set and baited in the Large Mammal enclosure; the cub took the bait and was easily trapped during the day. The cub was moved to the transition area of yard #1 so that he can see, smell, and interact with the other nine bear cubs for a day before they all have access to one another on October 20. 

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: October 7, 2017

Black Bear cub #17-2035 has been healing well during this past few weeks. On Friday, October 6, Dr. Alexa darted the cub so that she could take eight-week post-op radiographs of the bear’s injured leg. Dr. Alexa also removed the wire that was inserted through the bear’s fractured jaw. The cub weighed in at 20 kg – despite recovering from a jaw fracture, the cub hasn’t had any issues putting on weight since his admission!

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: September 9, 2017

Black Bear cub #17-2035 has been healing well during the past couple of weeks; the team has observed the cub placing weight on his healing leg, and the bear has been eating well. With the recent movement of Black Bear yearling #17-1767, cub #17-2035 was moved to the connecting chute of the Large Mammal Isolation enclosure.

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: August 15, 2017

Black Bear cub #17-2035 has been doing well since last week’s surgery; he’s bright, alert, and feisty! The rehab staff have been offering a bowl of soft food for the bear, which the cub is eating well.

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: August 11, 2017

On August 11, Drs. Alexa and Monica transported Black Bear cub #17-2035 to the Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates in the Richmond area for surgery with Dr. Alex Padron. Dr. Alexa gave many updates during the surgery – Dr. Padron was able to successfully insert two pins into the bear’s fractured humerus before inserting a plate over the fracture site. He was pleased with the alignment.

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Latest Update: August 9, 2017

During the past two days, Drs. Monica and Alexa have been coordinating the surgery for Black Bear cub #17-2035. Dr. Alex Padron of Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates in Richmond has agreed to do the surgery, which is tentatively scheduled for Friday, August 11. Dr. Padron will plate the bear’s fractured humerus; he’ll also investigate the young bear’s suspected mandible fracture and may wire the fracture if needed.

Great Horned Owlet #17-0363

On March 29, a Great Horned owlet was found in Mechanicsville on the ground -- the owlet was below a nest that was 100 feet up in the tree. The rescuer attempted to re-nest the owl, but the nest was too high to easily reach. The rescuer also tried to make a secondary nest for the owlet (in hopes that the parents would find the baby and continue to care for it), but the effort proved unsuccessful. The bird was then brought to a rehabilitator, who transferred the owlet to the Center.

Latest Update: October 18, 2017

Great Horned Owl #17-0363 was released on the evening of October 17 at James Madison’s Montpelier, in front of a crowd of about 75 people. Dr. Ernesto, the Center’s hospital director, performed the release honors; the owl flew off over a field and disappeared into the trees. Within a few minutes, a Red-tailed Hawk was seen – and heard! – reacting to the presence of the newest resident of the woods.

On March 29, a Great Horned owlet was found in Mechanicsville on the ground -- the owlet was below a nest that was 100 feet up in the tree. The rescuer attempted to re-nest the owl, but the nest was too high to easily reach. The rescuer also tried to make a secondary nest for the owlet (in hopes that the parents would find the baby and continue to care for it), but the effort proved unsuccessful. The bird was then brought to a rehabilitator, who transferred the owlet to the Center.

Latest Update: October 16, 2017

Great Horned Owl #17-0363 has been cleared for release by the veterinary team; the owlet will be released at James Madison’s Montpelier in Orange County on Tuesday, October 17 at 6:15 p.m. The release is open to the public; those attending are asked to RSVP to lkegley@wildlifecenter.org. Those planning on attending the release should enter through the main gate on Route 20 [Constitution Highway] and follow signs to the Visitor Center.

On March 29, a Great Horned owlet was found in Mechanicsville on the ground -- the owlet was below a nest that was 100 feet up in the tree. The rescuer attempted to re-nest the owl, but the nest was too high to easily reach. The rescuer also tried to make a secondary nest for the owlet (in hopes that the parents would find the baby and continue to care for it), but the effort proved unsuccessful. The bird was then brought to a rehabilitator, who transferred the owlet to the Center.

Latest Update: October 7, 2017

All three young Great Horned Owls have been flying very well – each is strong in flight, and also is silent, which is an important requirement for owl releases. On October 3, Papa G’Ho officially finished his surrogate duties for the year, and was moved to a C-pen enclosure; each of the young owls was moved to separate flight pens for mouse school practice and additional exercise. Rehabilitation intern Shannon said that the live-prey testing is off to a great start; the owls have passed three nights so far, and should finish the rest of their testing this weekend.

On March 29, a Great Horned owlet was found in Mechanicsville on the ground -- the owlet was below a nest that was 100 feet up in the tree. The rescuer attempted to re-nest the owl, but the nest was too high to easily reach. The rescuer also tried to make a secondary nest for the owlet (in hopes that the parents would find the baby and continue to care for it), but the effort proved unsuccessful. The bird was then brought to a rehabilitator, who transferred the owlet to the Center.

Latest Update: September 26, 2017

The Great Horned Owl family – Papa G’Ho and his three young foster owlets – has been doing well these past few weeks. On September 9, the family was moved to flight pen A2, so that the young owls could have more room as they practice flying.

On March 29, a Great Horned owlet was found in Mechanicsville on the ground -- the owlet was below a nest that was 100 feet up in the tree. The rescuer attempted to re-nest the owl, but the nest was too high to easily reach. The rescuer also tried to make a secondary nest for the owlet (in hopes that the parents would find the baby and continue to care for it), but the effort proved unsuccessful. The bird was then brought to a rehabilitator, who transferred the owlet to the Center.

Latest Update: June 22, 2017

Great Horned Owlets #17-0363, #17-0885, and #17-1135 are doing well; they are flying and eating consistently on their own.

As of June 21, Papa G'Ho and his three owlets are housed together in one of the outdoor flight pens. When an appropriate, larger enclosure becomes available (likely one of the "A-pens"), the rehabilitation staff will move the four birds; the larger space will give the growing family more room and space for the young birds to practice flying.

On March 29, a Great Horned owlet was found in Mechanicsville on the ground -- the owlet was below a nest that was 100 feet up in the tree. The rescuer attempted to re-nest the owl, but the nest was too high to easily reach. The rescuer also tried to make a secondary nest for the owlet (in hopes that the parents would find the baby and continue to care for it), but the effort proved unsuccessful. The bird was then brought to a rehabilitator, who transferred the owlet to the Center.

Latest Update: April 24, 2017

Owlet #17-0363 has been gaining weight and adjusting well to life with Papa G’Ho. Papa G'Ho is teaching the owl appropriate behaviors towards humans; when humans approach, the owlets expresses dissatisfaction with snaps and hisses - just like Papa.

White-tailed Deer Fawns of 2017

On May 18, the Center received its first deer fawn of 2017 -- officially kicking off "fawn season".

An infant male White-tailed Deer was admitted to the Center as patient #17-0996 after he was orphaned. His mother was hit by a car on May 14, and the fawn was found trying to cross a highway in Montgomery County.

Latest Update: October 13, 2017

During the past month, the rehabilitation staff ceased daily bottle feeding for the deer fawns and transitioned them to a diet of only browse and fruit. By early October, the fawns were well adjusted to their diet and were old enough to be released back to the wild.

With a small herd of five deer, the round-up of fawns went quickly and smoothly on the morning of October 7. A small team of people corralled the deer, and each fawn was grabbed so its ear tags could be removed and it could be carried to the horse trailer that would transport them to the release location.

On May 18, the Center received its first deer fawn of 2017 -- officially kicking off "fawn season".

An infant male White-tailed Deer was admitted to the Center as patient #17-0996 after he was orphaned. His mother was hit by a car on May 14, and the fawn was found trying to cross a highway in Montgomery County.

Latest Update: August 8, 2017

The Center is currently caring for four White-tailed Deer fawns. Though dozens of fawns have been admitted in 2017, a number of healthy fawns were transferred to other permitted rehabilitators with available space for fawns at their facilities. When possible and appropriate, healthy baby animals are transferred to other rehabilitators, freeing up space and time at the Center for animals that require specialized medical care.

Common Snapping Turtle #17-2211

On August 26, the Wildlife Center admitted a Snapping Turtle from Spotsylvania County. Snapping Turtle #17-2211 was rescued by animal control after it was observed with
Latest Update: September 12, 2017

Snapping Turtle #17-2211 has been doing well post-surgery. On September 11, Drs. Ernesto and Alexa applied an acrylic epoxy to the turtle’s surgical site; the epoxy will protect the shell where it was cut open during surgery, and allow the staff to soak the turtle. Snapping Turtles, like most aquatic turtles, have better appetites and increased hydration when they are allowed to eat in water.

On August 26, the Wildlife Center admitted a Snapping Turtle from Spotsylvania County. Snapping Turtle #17-2211 was rescued by animal control after it was observed with
Latest Update: September 6, 2017

Dr. Ernesto, Dr. Alexa, and veterinary technician Jenna performed Snapping Turtle 17-2211’s plastronectomy on the afternoon of September 6. The surgery lasted roughly four hours, but the team was unable to remove the hook.

 

Bald Eagle #16-0038

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: May 29, 2017

Earlier this year, Bald Eagle #16-0038 received clearance from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) for placement at an educational facility. The Bald Eagle will be going to live at Mill Mountain Zoo in Roanoke, Virginia. Mill Mountain has applied for permits with the USFWS regional office; once all paperwork is finalized, the bird will go to her new home.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: August 1, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 has remained in flight pen A1, one of the Wildlife Center’s largest outdoor enclosures. The eagle is exercised daily by rehabilitation staff members, who report that the eagle regularly flies approximately 12 laps during each session. Although the eagle is still flying at a low height, on July 31 the bird was observed to be flying with its feet tucked beneath its body. Perching and stamina are reported to be improving as well. As of July 25, the eagle weighed 4.40 kg (9.7 lb).

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: June 8, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 has continued daily exercise during the past two months. The eagle has been making gradual improvement, though still is not flying well enough for release. The eagle typically flies an average of 12-14 laps in the Center’s large A-pen enclosure; 10 of those passes are usually good in quality, though sometimes the eagle misses landing on a perch and then struggles to gain height once grounded.

The staff will continue to exercise the eagle each day.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 30, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038’s feet continue to slowly heal. On March 28, a routine check revealed that the lesion on the eagle’s left foot was swollen. A topical disinfectant and sealing agent were applied to the wound. Center staff continues to monitor the healing progress during bi-weekly foot and feather checks.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 15, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 remained in a small outdoor enclosure throughout the first half of March. On March 14, the veterinary team re-radiographed the eagle’s healing wing, and found that the fracture was healed and very stable. Dr. Dana noted that the eagle’s left wing is mildly stiff, but the bird is able to achieve full wing extension. The wounds on the eagle’s face and feet continue to heal well.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: March 1, 2016

On February 21, radiographs were taken to check on Bald Eagle #16-0038’s healing fracture; radiographs showed that the fracture alignment was unchanged. Dr. Dana expected to see a little more healing progress, but it’s likely that the fracture has been slower to callus since it’s been challenging for the vet staff to keep the eagle’s wing completely immobile.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 17, 2016

In the 10 days following her admission, Bald Eagle #16-0038 recovered in the Center’s holding room. At first, the eagle mostly left her wing bandage and body wrap alone, but soon it became a daily challenge to get the eagle to leave her bandages on! The eagle regularly picked at her wing bandages, and on a few occasions managed to partly remove or loosen them; Dr. Dana also noted that the bird is so large and strong, that even the body wrap doesn’t completely prevent the bird from slightly moving her injured wing.

On February 1, a mature Bald Eagle was found down on the ground in Stafford, Virginia. The bird was picked up by an animal control officer and taken to a local veterinary clinic before it was transferred to a permitted rehabilitator in the area. On February 2, the Bald Eagle was driven to the Wildlife Center of Virginia by a dedicated volunteer transporter.

Latest Update: February 5, 2016

Bald Eagle #16-0038 is recovering quietly at the Wildlife Center. Dr. Dana reports that the eagle is perching, eating well, and mostly leaving her bandages alone, which can be an important component of the healing process! The eagle’s heart rate has been within normal limits during the past two days.

The veterinary team continues to clean the eagle’s foot and face wounds daily; all lacerations are currently static. Repeat radiographs are scheduled for February 13.

Black Bear cub #17-0411

On April 10, a citizen found a lone bear cub near a road. There was no sign of a sow or any other cubs nearby. The Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was called, and after staying the night with a permitted wildlife rehabilitator, the cub was transported by VDGIF officers on the morning of April 11.

Latest Update: April 14, 2017

All three Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The two male cubs are well-matched for each other -- they are closer in age and weight, and enjoy playing with one another. At feeding time, the cubs are allowed free range of the room where they are housed, and they have time to romp and play after eating. The female cub has gained enough weight to graduate to three times a day feedings.

Here are two videos of the cub -- the first video is of the female and first male cub (before the third cub arrived).

Black Bear cub #17-0374

On April 4, a citizen in Madison County, Virginia, found a bear cub by itself. The citizen left the area in case the sow was nearby and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). To ensure that the bear wasn't unintentionally "bear-napped", everyone decided to leave the cub where it was. On the morning of April 5, the cub was still by itself and was crying, so a biologist with VDGIF picked up the cub and transported it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 14, 2017

All three Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The two male cubs are well-matched for each other -- they are closer in age and weight, and enjoy playing with one another. At feeding time, the cubs are allowed free range of the room where they are housed, and they have time to romp and play after eating. The female cub has gained enough weight to graduate to three times a day feedings.

Here are two videos of the cub -- the first video is of the female and first male cub (before the third cub arrived).

On April 4, a citizen in Madison County, Virginia, found a bear cub by itself. The citizen left the area in case the sow was nearby and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). To ensure that the bear wasn't unintentionally "bear-napped", everyone decided to leave the cub where it was. On the morning of April 5, the cub was still by itself and was crying, so a biologist with VDGIF picked up the cub and transported it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 11, 2017

The two bear cubs are doing well; both are eating well and gaining weight. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie says that both are becoming more playful and are wrestling with each other; the male cub is often interested in attempting to play while his new sister eats. The female cub (17-0352) now weighs 1.37 kg while the male (17-0374) weighs 1.90 kg.

On April 4, a citizen in Madison County, Virginia, found a bear cub by itself. The citizen left the area in case the sow was nearby and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). To ensure that the bear wasn't unintentionally "bear-napped", everyone decided to leave the cub where it was. On the morning of April 5, the cub was still by itself and was crying, so a biologist with VDGIF picked up the cub and transported it to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 6, 2017

The two bear cubs are doing well and are currently housed together. The female cub is currently taking her bottle well and eating four times a day;  she currently weighs 1.05 kg. The male cub only requires three feedings a day, based on his weight. Dr. Kelli reports that the male cub hasn't quite taken to his bottle yet, but is readily licking his formula and baby food from a lid.

Black Bear cub #17-0352

On March 31, an infant female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found crying under a log near a drainage opening in Roanoke County; the citizen who found the cub was concerned that the bear might fall into the drain and be swept away due to the heavy rain. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation; there was no sign of a sow, and the biologist decided to bring the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 14, 2017

All three Black Bear cubs are doing well at the Wildlife Center. The two male cubs are well-matched for each other -- they are closer in age and weight, and enjoy playing with one another. At feeding time, the cubs are allowed free range of the room where they are housed, and they have time to romp and play after eating. The female cub has gained enough weight to graduate to three times a day feedings.

Here are two videos of the cub -- the first video is of the female and first male cub (before the third cub arrived).

On March 31, an infant female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found crying under a log near a drainage opening in Roanoke County; the citizen who found the cub was concerned that the bear might fall into the drain and be swept away due to the heavy rain. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation; there was no sign of a sow, and the biologist decided to bring the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 11, 2017

The two bear cubs are doing well; both are eating well and gaining weight. Wildlife rehabilitator Brie says that both are becoming more playful and are wrestling with each other; the male cub is often interested in attempting to play while his new sister eats. The female cub (17-0352) now weighs 1.37 kg while the male (17-0374) weighs 1.90 kg.

On March 31, an infant female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found crying under a log near a drainage opening in Roanoke County; the citizen who found the cub was concerned that the bear might fall into the drain and be swept away due to the heavy rain. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation; there was no sign of a sow, and the biologist decided to bring the cub to the Wildlife Center.

Latest Update: April 6, 2017

The two bear cubs are doing well and are currently housed together. The female cub is currently taking her bottle well and eating four times a day;  she currently weighs 1.05 kg. The male cub only requires three feedings a day, based on his weight. Dr. Kelli reports that the male cub hasn't quite taken to his bottle yet, but is readily licking his formula and baby food from a lid.

Black Bear cub #17-2065

On August 8, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries brought an orphaned male cub from Patrick County to the Wildlife Center. The cub was bright, alert, and feisty and weighed in at 9.6 kg. Dr. Alexa, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, examined the cub, and found him to be mildly dehydrated, but otherwise healthy. Radiographs and blood work were within normal limits. The bear was given fluids and Dr.

Black Bear cub #17-0760

During the last week of April, a citizen who was kayaking in Alleghany County saw a lone bear cub on a river bank. The finder took some photos and consulted the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). Biologists asked the finder if she'd be willing to go out by kayak again days later to look for the lone cub; she did, and was able to capture the cub.

Black Bear cub #17-0745

On May 2, the wildlife veterinarian with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries delivered two Black Bear cubs to the Wildlife Center. One cub, #17-0744, was a female cub from Wise County, Virginia. The history on the cub is unclear, though it was found on the weekend of April 30.

Black Bear cub #17-0744

On May 2, the wildlife veterinarian with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries delivered two Black Bear cubs to the Wildlife Center. One cub, #17-0744, was a male cub found walking down the side of the road in Wythe County, Virginia.

Black Bear cub #17-0606

On April 24, a small Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Rockbridge County, Virginia, and arrangements were made to transport the cub to the Center the same evening.

Dr. Ernesto, the Center's Hospital Director, examined the female cub upon admission. He found that the cub was thin and dehydrated, weighing in at 1.62 kg. Blood work revealed mild anemia; otherwise, the cub did not have any injuries, and is generally considered healthy. Dr. Ernesto put an orange identification tag in the cub's right ear.

Black Bear cub #17-0444

On the evening of April 14, another Black Bear cub was admitted -- bringing the current cub total up to four!

Cub #17-0444, a female, was found in Bath County when someone observed her in a tree by herself. A Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries biologist was contacted. The cub was left alone to allow her the chance to reunite with her mother; unfortunately, no sow was seen and the cub was still by herself in a tree two days later. The cub's rescuer was able to capture her on Friday and brought her to the Wildlife Center.