Archive Patients

Black Bear cub #17-2065 [Double Orange]

On August 8, an officer with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries brought an orphaned male cub from Patrick County to the Wildlife Center. The cub was bright, alert, and feisty and weighed in at 9.6 kg. Dr. Alexa, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, examined the cub, and found him to be mildly dehydrated, but otherwise healthy. Radiographs and blood work were within normal limits. The bear was given fluids and Dr.

Black Bear cub #17-2035 [Double Yellow]

On August 5, a Black Bear cub was found under a bridge beside a road in Roanoke County, Virginia. It appeared as though the cub was hit by a vehicle; no sow was seen in the area. The bear was taken to the Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center for stabilization and overnight care before he was transported to the Wildlife Center the next morning.

Black Bear cub #17-0760

During the last week of April, a citizen who was kayaking in Alleghany County saw a lone bear cub on a river bank. The finder took some photos and consulted the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). Biologists asked the finder if she'd be willing to go out by kayak again days later to look for the lone cub; she did, and was able to capture the cub.

Black Bear cub #17-0745 [Pink Tag]

On May 2, the wildlife veterinarian with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries delivered two Black Bear cubs to the Wildlife Center. One cub, #17-0745, was a female cub from Wise County, Virginia. The history on the cub is unclear, though it was found on the weekend of April 30.

Black Bear cub #17-0744 [Yellow Tag]

On May 2, the wildlife veterinarian with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries delivered two Black Bear cubs to the Wildlife Center. One cub, #17-0744, was a male cub found walking down the side of the road in Wythe County, Virginia.

Black Bear cub #17-0606 [Orange Tag]

On April 24, a small Black Bear cub was found by the side of the road in Rockbridge County, Virginia, and arrangements were made to transport the cub to the Center the same evening.

Dr. Ernesto, the Center's Hospital Director, examined the female cub upon admission. He found that the cub was thin and dehydrated, weighing in at 1.62 kg. Blood work revealed mild anemia; otherwise, the cub did not have any injuries, and is generally considered healthy. Dr. Ernesto put an orange identification tag in the cub's right ear.

Black Bear cub #17-0444 [White Tag]

On the evening of April 14, another Black Bear cub was admitted -- bringing the current cub total up to four!

Cub #17-0444, a female, was found in Bath County when someone observed her in a tree by herself. A Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries biologist was contacted. The cub was left alone to allow her the chance to reunite with her mother; unfortunately, no sow was seen and the cub was still by herself in a tree two days later. The cub's rescuer was able to capture her on Friday and brought her to the Wildlife Center.

Black Bear cub #17-0411 [Green Tag]

On April 10, a citizen found a lone bear cub near a road. There was no sign of a sow or any other cubs nearby. The Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries was called, and after staying the night with a permitted wildlife rehabilitator, the cub was transported by VDGIF officers on the morning of April 11.

Black Bear cub #17-0374 [Red Tag]

On April 4, a citizen in Madison County, Virginia, found a bear cub by itself. The citizen left the area in case the sow was nearby and called the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). To ensure that the bear wasn't unintentionally "bear-napped", everyone decided to leave the cub where it was. On the morning of April 5, the cub was still by itself and was crying, so a biologist with VDGIF picked up the cub and transported it to the Wildlife Center.

Black Bear cub #17-0352 [No Tag]

On March 31, an infant female Black Bear cub was admitted to the Wildlife Center. The cub was found crying under a log near a drainage opening in Roanoke County; the citizen who found the cub was concerned that the bear might fall into the drain and be swept away due to the heavy rain. A biologist with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries assessed the situation; there was no sign of a sow, and the biologist decided to bring the cub to the Wildlife Center.

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