Archive Patients

Black Bear cub #19-0050

On the afternoon of January 23, the Wildlife Center received a Black Bear cub that had been burned in a fire. Sadly, within 24 hours, the cub succumbed to her injuries and died. 

The cub was in a large wood pile on a homeowner's property in Winchester; the brush pile had been present for years and was lit on fire on the morning of January 23. An adult bear was seen running away, then someone heard crying from the burn pile and found two cubs. The cubs were quickly taken to a local veterinary clinic. 

Bald Eagle #18-2865

On October 2, the Wildlife Center admitted adult Bald Eagle #18-2865 from Accomack County. The eagle was observed swimming to shore at a campground; upon reaching the shore, the eagle was rescued and taken to a nearby wildlife rehabilitator for assessment and stabilization. The eagle was transferred to the Center the following day.
 

Bufflehead #18-3068

On November 20, Bufflehead duck #18-3068 was admitted from Louisa County. The duck was found on the side of the road near a pond, unable to fly.

During the initial exam, the duck was weak and had difficulty holding up her head. The natural waterproofing of her feathers was compromised, indicating that she had possibly been out of the water for a short period of time. Despite a thorough physical examination, radiographs, and blood work, a clear diagnosis for the duck’s neurologic symptoms could not be identified; all results appeared to be relatively within normal limits.

Bald Eagle #18-3087

On the morning of November 26, staff at Peninsula Memorial Park in Newport News reported seeing a Bald Eagle on the ground, unable to fly.  Local permitted rehabilitators responded, and with the assistance of staff, located the bird in a wooded area of the memorial park.  The eagle was quickly caught.  A field exam revealed a broken left humerus with along with swelling in the left shoulder and mild dehydration.  The bird’s wing was wrapped and a small amount of oral fluids were provided prior to the eagle being transported the Wildlife Center for further care.

Canada Goose #18-2813

On September 25, the Wildlife Center admitted a Canada Goose from Powhatan County. Richmond Animal Care & Control picked up the goose after it was attacked by a dog.

Dr. Peach, the Center’s veterinary fellow, examined the goose when it arrived. The bird was thin and dehydrated but didn’t have any obvious wounds or fractures. Blood work revealed a slight anemia, but was otherwise within normal limits.

Canada Goose #18-2730

On September 13, a roofing crew spotted an adult Canada Goose on the roof of Petco in Staunton. The goose was quiet and not moving much; it appeared as though the goose had been on the roof for a significant period of time and could not get down. Staunton Animal Control Officers responded to the scene and called the Staunton Fire Department; rescuers were able to use a bucket truck to retrieve the distressed goose.

Great Horned Owl #18-2952

On October 19, a Great Horned Owl was admitted to the Wildlife Center from Bedford County, Virginia. The owl was initially found by the side of the road on October 5 and was taken to a local veterinary clinic. The owl was given medication and was fed venison and rabbit for about 12 days before it was transferred to a local permitted wildlife rehabilitator.

Black Bear #18-2293

On August 1, an adult female Black Bear was trapped in Rappahannock County; the bear had severe signs of mange, including significant hair loss.  The bear was transported to the Center and sedated for an examination with Drs. Peach and Karra.

Great Horned Owl #18-2502

On August 20, Great Horned Owl #18-2502 was admitted from Bath County, Virginia; the circumstances around the owl’s rescue were not clear, but the bird presented weak and malodorous with damp and tattered feathers. The owl was also dull and in poor body condition; it had likely been suffering from an illness or injury that hindered its ability to hunt and capture food.

Bald Eagle #18-2440

On August 14, a private citizen in Westmoreland County noticed a Bald Eagle grounded on a rocky area of the Potomac River with what appeared to be an injured wing, possibly the result of a fight with another eagle. The eagle was captured that day, and was transported to Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehabilitation. Wildlife rehabilitator Diana O’Connor transferred the eagle to the Wildlife Center the following afternoon.

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