Tracking NC99

On December 23, 2014, an immature male Bald Eagle was released at Natural Chimneys Park in Mt. Solon, Virginia. The eagle was admitted to the Wildlife Center in August 2014 after it was likely hit by a vehicle and suffered trauma to both eyes. Read more about the eagle’s history here.

At the Wildlife Center, the eagle was known as patient #14-1955 – the 1955th patient admitted in 2014. Now, the eagle will be known as NC99. “NC” represents Natural Chimneys, where the eagle was released. The number “99” is the last two digits on the transmitter that the eagle is wearing. This continues the identification trend that the Center started with the two Chincoteague eagles, C35 and C46. Now, the eagle will be known as NC99. “NC” represents Natural Chimneys, where the eagle was released. The number “99” is the last two digits on the transmitter that the eagle is wearing. This continues the identification trend that the Center started with the two Chincoteague eagles, C35 and C46.

January 2016: We haven't heard from NC99 in about five months. We know in August 2015, the battery voltage on the transmitter was quite low; the duty cycle was adjusted to see if the transmitter could more easily re-charge. Unfortunately, the tracking system suggests that the battery remained quite low, which hasn't allowed the bird to check-in.

August 23:  After more than a month of silence, NC99 checked in!  The eagle is still in Page County, Virginia, and is currently at the Battle Creek Landfill. Some data is missing from the bird's tracking system; this is due to low battery voltage. It's likely that this bird has been fairly sedentary and has spent a good bit of time in the shade, which hasn't allowed the transmitter to fully recharge. Perhaps with the recent cooler weather, and fall on the way, we'll once again see regular check-ins from this eagle.

July 21: Bald Eagle NC99 has not checked in since July 15. At his last check-in, the bird was still around the banks of the South Fork Shenandoah River.

July 13:  Bald Eagle NC99 has continued to explore the area around the South Fork Shenandoah River in the past week. The bird took a brief trip northeast of Alma, but returned to the banks of the river on July 13.

 

Where was he?  Tracking Archives

Frequently Asked Questions about the Transmitter