Call of the Wild Conference 2018

November 16-18, 2018

 

Friday, November 16

Classes were canceled due to a severe ice storm and citywide power outage in Waynesboro. 

Saturday, November 17

Session 1 – 8:45 am - 9:45 am 

So You Think You Want To Be A Home Rehabber?          
Interested in becoming a home rehabber but not sure where to start? Feeling overwhelmed? Not sure if you have enough time? Confused by all the details – permits, training, record-keeping, supplies, zoonosis, home inspections, sponsors, vaccinations, formula, etc.? Help is on the way! This class will break down all the details you need to know to get started at home, acquire equipment and supplies, find and work with a sponsor, set realistic goals, stay out of trouble, keep your sanity, and have you looking forward to the next baby season. This class is open to all but will focus on individuals in Virginia interested in getting started practicing wildlife rehabilitation in the home setting, or seasoned rehabilitators interested in sponsoring a new home-based rehabilitator.
Linda McDanielAugusta Cottontails

Pain Management in Wildlife**++
This presentation will cover all aspects of pain management, including the importance of a good veterinary-rehabilitator relationship, indications for different pain management techniques, and drug/treatment options.
Jen Riley, DVMBlue Ridge Wildlife Center

Session 2 – 9:55 am - 10:25 am 

What's Wrong with My Patient? A Guideline and Overview to the Physical Exam (Lecture)**++
This lecture will give participants an overview of how to perform a basic physical exam in avian, mammalian, and reptilian patients. We will focus on examining the patient systematically, making sure to include all body systems. This lecture is open to all attendees; it is required for anyone taking one of the afternoon hands-on workshops. 
Karra Pierce, DVM, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Session 3 – 10:35 am 

The Hurricane is Coming! To Run or to Stay? Lecture [30-minute lecture ends at 11:05 am]**++
This lecture will focus on the basics of preparedness and response in case of an emergency affecting any rehabilitation facility. Attendees will learn the basic principles of what to do before, during, and after an emergency, including how to make an emergency plan, and how to build a help network. Attendees will learn some regulations and restrictions for moving animals in case of emergency or disaster. This lecture is open to all attendees; it is required for anyone taking the afternoon workshop.
Ernesto Dominguez, DVM, CWR, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Squirrel Ailments [90-minute lecture ends at 12:05 pm]++
From orphaned pinkie to hefty adults, fast and furious releases, and any ailments or injury in between or beyond, this session gives the squirrel its due. Routine calls, as well as unusual questions regarding our friend (and potential victim or troublemaker) the squirrel, will be discussed. This interactive class will help us stock our rehab knowledge toolbox with "what to do's" in any squirrel situation. The squirrel … some people can't live with them, and most wildlife rehabilitators can't live without them.
Linda Bergman-AlthouseWildlife Rehabilitators of North Carolina & Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter

Session 4 – 11:10 - 12:10 pm  

The Corvids: Learning from Biology to Aid in Rehabilitation++
Caring for intelligent, highly social species in rehabilitation can be challenging, especially so for the corvid family. We will explore the biology and behaviors that make American and Fish Crows and Blue Jays so engaging and often an issue for rehabbers!  We will discuss nutritional needs based on their natural diets, how to encourage natural foraging behaviors, review of enrichment ideas to help prevent boredom and aid in the development of skills that will help once they are released and (hopefully) integrated into their own corvid society.  Handouts will include species profiles based on natural history and developmental milestones, diet steps, and housing ideas.
Lynn Miller, CWR, PhD, South Florida Wildlife Center

LUNCH & NETWORKING – 12:10 pm - 1:25 pm 

Session 5 – 1:25 pm - 2:25 pm

Reptile Triage**++
It is not uncommon for reptiles to need rehabilitation, particularly after experiencing trauma. Of those reptiles affected by trauma, the most common cause is due to vehicles. Wound-care and prognostic variables are therefore important. This presentation will go over reptile handling, triage, wound-care, and prognostic variables for reptiles. Additional advanced methods of triage and care for reptiles such as photobiomodulation (cold laser therapy) and acupuncture techniques will be covered.
Tara Harrison, DVM, MPVM, DACZM, DACVPM, DECZM (Zoo Health Management), CVANorth Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine

Improving Wildlife Corridors in Virginia: Identifying Collision Hotspots
The Virginia Safe Wildlife Corridors Collaborative (VSWCC) is a multidisciplinary group committed to protecting people and wildlife by reducing animal-vehicle conflicts and improving safe wildlife passage. VSWCC is interested in habitat connectivity measures for all species of wildlife, big and small, and aims to not only reduce wildlife-vehicle conflicts but also work towards implementing measures that allow the safe movement of wildlife across roads.  Part of the group’s work involves identifying “hotspots” –road segments in Virginia where wildlife-vehicle conflict is most prevalent. GIS mapping and modeling were used to identify the areas that are potentially in greatest need of mitigation for deer- and bear-vehicle collisions; these models will guide field validation for areas of focus in the coming year. This talk includes an overview of VSWCC’s mission and project roster; researchers will present results from modeling/mapping used to identify large animal collision hotspots throughout the state.
Raina DeFonza, Wildlife Center of Virginia; Matthias Leu, Yorick Oden-Plants, William & Mary 

Session 6 – 2:35 pm - 3:35 pm

BATS [replacement class for canceled talk]
Leslie Sturges, The Save Lucy Campaign

The Hurricane is Coming! To Run or to Stay? Workshop**++ 
During this workshop, attendees will experience simulation exercises of a real emergency in a wildlife rehabilitation setting. Participants will have limited time and resources to save staff, volunteers, and the animals in care. Learn how to respond to the emergency, activate emergency services, and start the internal or external movement of animals through a help network. Those attending the workshop must attend the morning disaster lecture. Space is limited. There is an $8 additional workshop fee.
Ernesto Dominguez, DVM, CWR, 
Wildlife Center of Virginia

What’s Wrong with My Patient? Workshop #1** ++
This hands-on workshop will give participants the opportunity to practice and develop their physical exam skills in a small group setting, with guidance and support. Those attending the workshop must attend the morning physical exam lectureSpace is limited. There is a $10 additional workshop fee.
Karra Pierce, DVM, 
Wildlife Center of Virginia 
 

Session 7 – 3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

You CAN Rehab Neonate Bunnies: Tips for Success!++         
Cottontails are one of the most frequently admitted species in wildlife rehabilitation, yet there is an overwhelming shortage of bunny rehabbers -- and even FEWER who will do neonates.  The standard reason is, “I don’t do bunnies because they just die.”  Bunnies are notorious for their high mortality rate, but that doesn’t have to be the case.  Bunnies really can thrive in rehab – even neonates!  This class will discuss tips on feeding, weaning, stimulating, and housing neonate bunnies, but the focus will be on the most CRITICAL stage for them – the period surrounding their eyes opening.  Learn why they tend to develop GI complications (soft stool, “wet bottom,” diarrhea) at this stage and how to effectively prevent and treat “the big D.”
Tanya Lee, Wildlife Care Alliance

WILD-ONe Workshop**   
This interactive workshop will provide an overview of the Center’s FREE online patient management system, WILD-ONe (Wildlife Incident Log/Database and Online Network). Bring your laptop or tablet, patient records, and questions as we explore the capabilities of WILD-ONe, with time for one-on-one advice on how the system can best be used to manage your patient records and donor contacts. Workshop participants must bring their own laptop or tablet to participate; no iPads or iPhones, please! Space is limited.
Leigh-Ann Horne, LVT, 
Wildlife Center of Virginia

What’s Wrong with My Patient? Workshop #2
This hands-on workshop will give participants the opportunity to practice and develop their physical exam skills in a small group setting, with guidance and support. Those attending the workshop must attend the morning physical exam lectureSpace is limited. There is a $10 additional workshop fee.
Dr. Karra Pierce, DVM, 
Wildlife Center of Virginia 

Sunday, November 18

Session 1 – 8:00 am - 9:00 am 

Lost in Translation: Understanding Terminology and Medical Jargon**++
This lecture will review the transfer of wildlife from a veterinary hospital to a rehabilitator from two different perspectives: the vet/vet tech/vet staff perspective and the rehabilitator perspective. For vets/techs/vet staff, discussion will include a review of necessary information to gather from the Good Samaritan dropping off the animal, as well as what information needs to be given to the receiving rehabber. Information will also include how to create easy-to-follow discharge plans to send along for the animal. For the rehabbers, discussion will include how to better understand discharge instructions sent home by your veterinarian, important questions to ask the vet when an animal is being transferred, and understanding common medications used for wildlife. If time allows, discussion will include how rehabbers can network with local vet hospitals to try to streamline and simplify the intake and transfer of animals.
Charlene Braman, LVT

Hatchling Success++ 
Hand-raising baby birds may be one of the most challenging aspects of wildlife rehabilitation. The smaller and younger the bird is, the lower the success rate and the higher the intimidation factor.  These fragile hatchlings require long hours and specialized care. This presentation will touch on the process of incubation and hatching, and, most importantly, how to increase success with hand-rearing from hatch to release.
Leighann ClineSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Session 2 – 9:10 am - 10:10 am

Fracture Assessment in Wildlife: More than just the Break**++
Fracture assessment can be overwhelming for new (and sometimes veteran!) wildlife rehabilitators. This lecture will deconstruct the fracture assessment process -- considering numerous factors such as the species' stress level in captivity, location of the fracture, concurrent disease, and capabilities of the facility -- to help rehabilitators develop a more accurate assessment and prognosis.
Amber McNamara, DVM, CVAMay Wildlife Rehabilitation Center at Lees-McRae College

Introduction to Songbird Rehab and Triage Lecture++
How do you get a fussy fledgling to eat easily? How can you stabilize a broken wing? What makes young cardinals so unusual to rehab? This class and complimentary workshop is a crash course for both the newbie and the seasoned rehabber to learn new skills and improve upon existing ones to make songbird rehabilitation less stressful for you and for your feathered patients. This lecture is open to all attendees; it is required for anyone taking the afternoon workshops.
E. Haley Olsen-HodgesSouthwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke

Session 3 – 10:20 am - 11:20 am

Ask the Vet: An Interactive Discussion**
Do you have medical questions regarding your wildlife patients? Wondering about the best method to treat an injury?  Not quite sure how to use that donated piece of medical equipment? This interactive question-and-answer session will feature a panel of veterinarians, including vets from the Wildlife Center of Virginia. Participants are encouraged to pre-submit questions before the conference to outreach@wildlifecenter.org; we’ll also have a question box at the conference for last-minute questions. If time allows, the panel will answer live questions from the audience. 
Ernesto Dominguez, DVM, CWR, Wildlife Center of Virginia; Peach Van Wick, DVM, Wildlife Center of Virginia; Jen Riley, DVM, Blue Ridge Wildlife Center; Amber McNamara, DVM, CVAMay Wildlife Rehabilitation Center at Lees-McRae College

Virginia Opossum Care: Using Science to Aid Rehabilitators++
Based on the scientific literature covering biological milestones in developing marsupials, the care of these amazing animals has been evolving. This presentation will take you through the many aspects of their nutrition, offering a growth and care chart and recipes targeting specific developmental stages. To ensure optimal growth, rehabilitators also need to recognize when very specific supplemental care and anti-microbial support are appropriate. These strategies are all based on the admission conditions, weight range, and developmental age. Handouts will cover step-by-step growth and care charts, species snapshots, and diet ideas.
Lynn Miller, CWR, PhD , South Florida Wildlife Center

Session 4 – 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Rehabilitation in Costa Rica
Have you wondered what it would be like to rehab animals in paradise?  This discussion will offer insights and experiences on rehabilitation at Alturas Wildlife Sanctuary in Costa Rica.  Learn about the animals, the challenges and the rewards of rehabbing animals in a developing country, and how to help.  From glorious waterfalls to mudslides and the rainy season, paradise isn't always all it's cracked up to be.
Karen Brace, Wildlife Rescue League

Introduction to Songbird Rehab and Triage Workshop #1 *This workshop is now full*++
In this hands-on workshop, participants will have a chance to practice techniques and skills covered in the morning lecture, including physical examinations, triage, and bandaging on songbirds. Those attending the workshop must attend the morning songbird rehab and triage lecture. Space is limited. There is a $10 additional workshop fee.
E. Haley Olsen-Hodges
Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke
*If you'd like to be on the waiting list for this workshop, please make a note in the comments section of your registration form*

LUNCH & NETWORKING – 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm 

Session 5 – 1:45 pm - 2:45 pm

The Elusive Fisher [30 min replacement talk]
Lynn Miller, CWR, PhD, South Florida Wildlife Center

Anatomy of an Epizootic: Mange in Wildlife [30 min replacement talk]
Lynn MillerCWR, PhD, South Florida Wildlife Center

Introduction to Songbird Rehab and Triage Workshop #2 [Repeat] *++
In this hands-on workshop, participants will have a chance to practice techniques and skills covered in the morning lecture, including physical examinations, triage, and bandaging on songbirds. Those attending the workshop must attend the morning songbird rehab and triage lecture. Space is limited. There is a $10 additional workshop fee.
E. Haley Olsen-Hodges
Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke

Session 6 – 2:50 pm - 3:50 pm

Wildlife Patients as Snapshots: How the Rehab Community Can Contribute to the Bigger Picture**
Every patient that comes through our doors has the potential to tell a story, to teach us about what's going on in the world around us, and to help other animals.  In this lecture, learn about the various research projects in which the Wildlife Center is involved and how you can become a part of this important aspect of wildlife rehabilitation and conservation medicine!
Peach Van Wick, DVM, Wildlife Center of Virginia

 

Continuing Education Credits

The Call of the Wild conference offers CE opportunities to permitted wildlife rehabilitators as well as veterinarians, licensed veterinary technicians, and animal control officers. Certificates are provided at the conference.

** These classes are eligible for continuing education hours for licensed veterinarians and veterinary technicians in Virginia based on 18VAC150-20-70, item 2.h. The Call of the Wild conference is co-sponsored by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Five hours are available Friday, five hours are available Saturday, and a total of four hours are available Sunday. 

++ These classes are approved for animal control officer (ACO) CE [up to six hours available Friday, six hours available Saturday, and five hours available Sunday].