Call of the Wild 2017 classes

Friday, November 17, 2017:

Wildlife Care Academy REHAB classes: 
REHAB 105: Wildlife Capture, Restraint, Handling, & Transport ++
REHAB 101: Introduction to Wildlife Rehabilitation ++
REHAB 203: Wildlife Rehabilitation Fundamentals ++

Wildlife Care Academy MGT classes: 
MGT 104: Basic Elements of a Strategic Plan – What does success look like? 
MGT 111: Excellent Animal Care Organizations Depend On PEOPLE! 
MGT 204: Fundraising for Wildlife Care – “Nobody gives you money because you need it!" 

For full class descriptions, please see the Wildlife Care Academy Course Catalog.

Veterinary Training Course**
This four-hour session is for veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and veterinary assistants and will be taught by the Center’s veterinarians and licensed veterinary technicians. The training will address specific skills needed for triaging wild animals, including handling/restraint, radiographs, ophthalmic examinations, and avian bandaging. Discussion will include triage decision-making in common wildlife scenarios and reporting of wildlife to appropriate agencies and governing bodies. Attendees will have the chance to tour the Wildlife Center and see the diagnostic equipment used in daily treatments.

Saturday, November 18, 2017:

Connecting with Nature: Teaching Life Lessons
Kick off the conference with an inspiring session led by Dr. Mamie Parker! This discussion will highlight how we can connect kids and adults to the outdoors and will offer important tips on making those connections between everyday life and the natural world. The session will be interactive and will teach participants how to get others inspired to care more for wildlife and the environment.
Dr. Mamie Parker, MA Parker & Associates 

Aw Shucks, I’m Crushed! Turtle Shell Repair Techniques Lecture++ **
Learn about techniques to fix turtle fractures including how to recognize which fractures should be stabilized and which ones should be left alone! This lecture is open to all attendees; it is required for anyone taking one of the afternoon hands-on labs. 
Dr. Alexa Ortiz, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Once Upon a Time: Storytelling in Wildlife Education
Stories have the power to engage, educate, and empower. As members of the wildlife rehabilitation community, we have access to some of the most compelling stories about wildlife. Our patients' stories can convey important messages about human-wildlife interactions; they can teach people about natural history, encourage them to make better decisions when interacting with wildlife, or inspire them to support your work as a rehabilitator. As wildlife rehabilitators, it is your responsibility to help improve human-wildlife relationships by educating your community, and storytelling can be one of your most valuable tools. In this presentation, we will discuss the role of storytelling in community outreach, fundraising, and wildlife education, as well as share techniques for developing and sharing your patient stories.  
Raina DeFonza, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Wildlife Rehabilitation Permit Considerations in Virginia++ **
This session, led by the VDGIF Wildlife Permits Coordinator, will address numerous topics, including wildlife rehabilitation permit conditions, acceptable continuing education unit (CEUs) credits, and rehabilitator’s continuity of operations planning. The state rehabilitation advisory committee will also be discussed, and attendees will have the chance to meet and hear from committee members.
Randy Francis, Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries

Safely Integrating Wild Foods into Your Rehab Practice++
Announcing the launch of a new online tool built specifically for rehabbers to help you use more wild plant foods in your practice! Quickly and with more confidence, know which wild plants your specific animal species’ are likely to eat.  Get access to more than 900 plant part listings for more than 200 animals covering the use of browse, nuts, seeds, fruit and greens. Plus, we will tackle the complex topic of plant toxicities and ways to work with the fact that plants have defenses, too! 
Kate Guenther, Wild Foods 4 Wildlife

Helping Orphaned Songbirds Learn Their Song 
This presentation covers what is known on how birds learn to sing and the time frame during which song is acquired.  Discussion includes how we can best provide for the necessary learning for orphans in rehabilitation, including which species have been shown to benefit from hearing adult song on tape.  Help your orphans learn to sing. 
Jean Chamberlain, Wildlife Rehabilitators of North Carolina

Rehabilitating Wildlife: Mending Human Souls
Ever feel burned out, while simultaneously feeling like you just can't give enough? "The antidote to exhaustion is not necessarily rest ," remarked Brother David Steindl-Rast to poet David Whyte. "What is it then?" asked David Whyte. "The antidote to exhaustion is wholeheartedness," concluded Brother David. This interactive workshop will explore one of the most important human dimensions of wildlife rehabilitation: the he (art) of service and what it is to be a healer amidst a world of wounds.
Jamie Reaser

Disease, Trauma, and Stabilization of Raptors++ **
The lecture will encompass basic raptor anatomy, the most common infectious and non-infectious diseases, the common presentation of trauma patients, and the approach for their treatment and stabilization.
Dr. Octavio Romo, Stahl Exotic Animal Veterinary Services

Aw Shucks, I’m Crushed! Turtle Shell Repair Techniques Lab++ **
This hands-on lab will allow attendees to practice the shell repair techniques discussed in the morning lecture. Those attending a lab must attend the morning shell repair lecture. Space is limited. There is a $10 additional lab fee.
Dr. Alexa Ortiz, Wildlife Center of Virginia

USFWS Law Enforcement Investigations++ 
Officers from the local U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service district will discuss how special agents work to protect threatened and endangered species. Special agents target criminal activities such as wildlife trafficking and habitat destruction. Learn more about wildlife crime reporting and the work that the local agents do on behalf of wildlife.
Special Agent Chris Mina, United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Aw Shucks, I’m Crushed! Turtle Shell Repair Techniques Lab++ **
This hands-on lab will allow attendees to practice the shell repair techniques discussed in the morning lecture. Those attending a lab must attend the morning shell repair lecture. Space is limited. There is a $10 additional lab fee.
Dr. Alexa Ortiz, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Seed Cleaning Demo
For those who attended the "Safely Integrating Wild Foods into Your Rehab Practice" lecture -- see how seeds are "cleaned" and prepared as a bird seed and wildlife food. Discussion will include how to know when seeds are "ripe" and the demonstration will allow attendees to see the cleaning, threshing, and winnowing process for a variety of seeds. Sign-up at Kate's exhibit table at the conference for this demonstration. Space is limited and will be first-come, first-served for sign-ups at the conference. 
Kate Guenther, Wild Foods 4 Wildlife

 

Sunday, November 19, 2017

More Than Meets the Eye: The Basics of Avian Ophthalmology in Wildlife++ **
Take a look at avian ophthalmology and the importance of the sense of sight to birds. This session will discuss the unique qualities of the avian eye, identifying and differentiating ocular problems, and what you can do about them.
Dr. Monica Madera, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Calories, Calories, Calories (and a Few Other Things):  Basic Cottontail Rehabilitation++
This class will cover the basics of hand-rearing orphaned Eastern Cottontails, and will provide information that can be utilized in and tailored to a variety of settings.  The focus will be on the minimum intake, tube-feeding and housing requirements necessary for successful cottontail rehabilitation.  
Kim Cole, Virginia Permitted Wildlife Rehabilitator

The Complex World of Songbirds, Simplified++
With more than 450 species found in Virginia, birds are an incredibly diverse, varied, and complex group. This talk will primarily focus on the natural history of songbirds and how peculiar aspects of each species directly affects their care needs in rehab. Did you know there are some birds that will never drink water provided in a dish? Did you know there are several species that need to be tutored in song, even as adults? Did you know that a bird you are overwintering may have a completely different winter diet than its summer diet? How do you best provide for these cases? Find out all this and more!
Elizabeth “Haley” Olsen-Hodges, Southwest Virginia Wildlife Center of Roanoke

Starvation: When Nutrition and Fluids are the Problem and the Solution Lecture++ **
Animals are what they eat and drink. Discussion will include information about essential nutrients, types of fluids, and rehabilitation diets. Attendees will know more about the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of emaciation patients including mammals, reptiles, and birds. Participants will learn about the benefits and contraindications of fluids and nutritional support in starvation cases. This lecture is open to all attendees; it is required for anyone taking one of the afternoon hands-on labs.
Dr. Ernesto Dominguez, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Batty, It’s Cold Outside!++
Bat rehabbers in the mid-Atlantic and northern states are seeing an increase in winter bat calls. In fact, in some parts of Virginia, winter bat intakes outnumber those for orphan season.  Learn how to triage these increasingly common cases, and when and how to intervene.
Leslie Sturges, The Save Lucy Campaign

Rodenticide Toxicosis++ **
Rodenticides, colloquially referred to as rat poison, are ubiquitously used for pest control.  These rodenticides, however, are affecting not only the mice and rats that they target, but also wild animals, through primary and secondary consumption.  Rodenticides exist in various forms, with anticoagulant rodenticides being the most commonly used and most well known, and this talk will focus primarily on anticoagulant rodenticides.  Discussion will include the mode of action of anticoagulant rodenticides, clinical signs, diagnostics, and treatment for anticoagulant rodenticide toxicosis in wildlife.  This talk will focus mostly on anticoagulant rodenticide toxicosis in raptors, but will touch on other wildlife species that may be affected by anticoagulant rodenticides.
Dr. Kristy Jacobus, City Wildlife

Starvation: When Nutrition and Fluids are the Problem and the Solution Lab++ **
The lab will offer hands-on practice with fluid administration (subcutaneous, intraosseous, and oral), gavage and tube feeding, and energy and fluid calculations. Participants will practice on mammal, reptile, and bird cadavers. Those attending a lab must attend the morning starvation lecture. Space is limited. There is a $8 additional lab fee for supplies.
Dr. Ernesto Dominguez, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Diarrhea Cha-Cha-Gone: Combatting the Effects of Lactose Intolerance in Neonate Mammals++
Diarrhea in neonate mammals is difficult to control once it has initiated, so the ultimate goal is prevention.  Neonate opossums are particularly susceptible to persistent diarrhea and research has confirmed that this is because young marsupials are lactose intolerant.  Recently, a study was conducted on neonate opossums that resulted in successfully preventing diarrhea caused by lactose intolerance.  Come hear about this home rehabber’s delve into the scientific world, discover what this “secret weapon” is, and learn the implications for other neonate mammals.
Tanya Lee, Wildlife Care Alliance

Starvation: When Nutrition and Fluids are the Problem and the Solution Lab ++ **
The lab will offer hands-on practice with fluid administration (subcutaneous, intraosseous, and oral), gavage and tube feeding, and energy and fluid calculations. Participants will practice on mammal, reptile, and bird cadavers. Those attending a lab must attend the morning starvation lecture. Space is limited. There is a $8 additional lab fee for supplies.
Dr. Ernesto Dominguez, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Fur and Fenders:  Research and Mitigation to Reduce Animal-Vehicle Collisions on I-64
Virginia is consistently among the top 10 states with the highest number of deer-vehicle collisions, with more than 60,000 of these crashes in recent years.  The Virginia Department of Transportation has targeted a section of I-64 on and near Afton Mountain for safety and mobility improvements because of a high number of crashes and traffic stoppages, many of which result from deer and other wildlife attempting to cross the interstate.  This presentation describes ongoing research and mitigation by the Virginia Transportation Research Council, VDOT’s research division, to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions along I-64.  A camera monitoring study is being conducted to determine the effectiveness of newly installed wildlife fencing along existing underpasses.  The fencing is designed to increase the use of underpasses by wildlife and to decrease collisions.
Bridget Donaldson, Virginia Transportation Research Council

How to Take the Paper (and Some Work) out of your Paperwork**
After the last cage has been cleaned and the last gaping mouth has been fed, no one looks forward to the pile of paper records that need updating.  This lecture will discuss how a free, online record-keeping system (WILD-ONe) can assist not only with your daily admissions and dispositions but also keep you in contact with current and potential donors and generate your state and federal annual reports within seconds!
Leigh-Ann Horne, LVT, Wildlife Center of Virginia

The Canary in the Coal Mine: The Connection Between Human, Animal and Environmental Health++ **
Learn about the diseases that affect you and the world around you.  This session will cover the role of wildlife in the "One Health" initiative by discussing the health concerns of animals and humans and emphasizing the importance of staying safe while caring for your patients. 
Dr. Peach Van Wick, Wildlife Center of Virginia

Continuing Education Credits

The Call of the Wild conference offers CE opportunities to permitted wildlife rehabilitators as well as veterinarians, licensed veterinary technicians, and animal control officers. Certificates are provided at the conference. 

++ = approved courses for animal control officer (ACO) CE [up to six hours available Friday, five hours available Saturday, and six hours available Sunday]. 

** = These classes are eligible for continuing education hours for licensed veterinarians and veterinary technicians in Virginia based on 18VAC150-20-70, item 2.h. The Call of the Wild conference is co-sponsored by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.